Zelda franchise strategy guide/Printable version


Zelda franchise strategy guide

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Characters/Cucco

A cucco is a chicken-like species, first introduced as a comic element in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. They are generally just used as livestock, but it doesn't seem like they are eaten like raised chickens would. Although normally docile, if a Cucco is constantly attacked it will echo out a cry and summon a flock of nearby Cuccos to relentlessy peck at the helpless attacker.

There also seems to be rare cases where a Cucco turns a blue shade, instead of a normal red and white color scheme. There are also strange Golden Cuccos in The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap which can even jump out of someone's hands when carried! There is also another species that has been altered to fit into the size of a persons hand, and are dubbed Pocket Cuccos.



Characters/Great Deku Tree

The Great Deku Tree is a large tree who appears in Ocarina of Time and The Wind Waker.

The Great Deku Tree is not to be confused with the Deku Tree that appears in The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons. As that game is not even set in Hyrule, and trees are, well, rooted to the spot, he can't realistically be the same tree in both places.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The Great Deku Tree is the 'Father of the Forest' charged with watching over the Kokiri who live in Kokiri Forest and the Lost Woods. He is an exceptionally large tree with a human-like face located in a clearing in the southern area of Kokiri Forest. When the game begins, the Deku Tree is suffering from a curse cast upon him by Ganondorf in an effort to gain the Spiritual Stone of Forest which is in the Deku Tree's possession. Knowing Link's destiny, the Deku Tree sends Navi the fairy to retrieve the boy and asks him to destroy the curse spider within him. Though Link defeats Gohma, it is too late. Before he dies, the Deku Tree gives Link the Kokiri Emerald and tells him to seek out Princess Zelda at Hyrule Castle. After adult Link completes the Forest Temple, however, a new Deku Sprout appears. It is this sprout who tells Link the truth about his past. This is presumably the same tree Link comes across in The Wind Waker. A theory in the original Legend of Zelda is that the first dungeon, the Tree Dungeon, is a dead Deku Tree.



Characters/Impa

Impa (インパ, Inpa) is a character who acts as a caretaker to Princess Zelda. There are multiple versions of the character named Impa throughout the Zelda series, just as there are multiple Link and Zelda characters. As with Link and Zelda, all versions of the character share personality traits.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Impa, the aged nursemaid of Zelda, is saved by Link from an attack by a group of Octoroks. She tells Link of Zelda's plight of being captured by Ganon. Although Impa does not appear in the game, the manual recounts this story.

Zelda II: The Adventure of LinkEdit

Once Link gains the Triforce symbol on the back of his hand on his sixteenth birthday, she notices it, and asks of him to break the curse on Princess Zelda. She does not appear ingame. This is the same Impa from the first game.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Impa is one of the last survivors of the race of Sheikah, the ancient protectors of the Hylian Royal Family. She has silvery-gray hair and red eyes. She was born and raised in Kakariko Village, and though she still keeps a house there, she now lives at Hyrule Castle serving as nursemaid and bodyguard to Princess Zelda. Link first meets Impa as a child after sneaking into Hyrule Castle Courtyard to meet Zelda. After teaching Link "Zelda's Lullaby", Impa escorts him out of the castle. When Ganondorf attacks Hyrule Castle, Impa takes Zelda and flees on horseback. The two spend the next seven years in hiding from Ganondorf. When the Shadow Spirit, Bongo Bongo, breaks its seal and emerges to wreak havoc upon Kakariko Village, Impa heads to the Shadow Temple to reseal it. When Link completes the Shadow Temple, Impa is awakened as the Shadow Sage. Link receives the Shadow Medallion from her.

It is interesting to note that in this game, Impa is noticeably younger and stronger than presented before. She is a woman clad in armor on her torso, boots, gauntlets, and pants and carrying a Kodachi short sword on her back. Impa appears to be in her late 30s, early 40s in stark contrast to the old woman probably in her 60s or 70s when she first appeared in Zelda II. This is the first Impa to appear in an actual game; previous iterations were mentioned in manuals, but never appeared as characters.

Oracle of Ages/Oracle of SeasonsEdit

This incarnation of Impa is also the nursemaid of Princess Zelda, and is also noticeably fatter. She is sent to bring Nayru and Din, the Oracles of Ages and Seasons respectively, to Hyrule for the safety of the lands of Labrynna and Holodrum, but she fails in her quest. It is up to Link to save them.

In Ages, similar to The Legend of Zelda, she is under attack by Octoroks. Link saves her, and she accompanies Link to get to Nayru. Once Link reaches her and listens to her music, he becomes aware that Impa is possessed by Veran. After Veran takes possession of Nayru, Impa awakens and gives Link a wooden sword (or a wooden shield, if it's a linked game).

In Seasons, after Din is captured by Onox, Impa is by Link's side, and explains the situation. Once she finishes, she sends him to the Maku Tree.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In Twilight Princess, a woman named Impaz lives in the Hidden Village, which is implied to be the residence of the remnants of the Shiekah tribe. Impaz also says that she is named for her ancestor who founded the village (most likely Impa from Ocarina of Time).

Once again, Impaz is depicted as a small, elderly woman with grey-white hair and red eyes, and seems to be the last survivor of the Sheikah clan. In this incarnation she also has a rather large collection of pet cats.

CD-IEdit

Impa only appears in Zelda: Wand of Gamelon. She bears the triforce of wisdom as Zelda goes on her adventure. Although she slightly helps Zelda, she does not appear in the ending of the game.



Enemies/Armos

An Armos is a fictional, animated statue in The Legend of Zelda series. An Armos typically poses as a statue or suit of armor, but attacks when approached. They have had appeared in several games, with many different appearances.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

The original Armos in The Legend of Zelda resembles a suit of armor. They appear near Death Mountain, where they are orange, the Lost Woods, where they are green, and in the graveyard where they are white. Some Armos move fast, others move slow. Armos occasionally cover a hidden staircase that could be revealed by touching the Armos, causing it to move. One hides the power bracelet which can be used to move rocks to reveal a series of hidden staircases to move through the land quickly.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

The sequel, The Adventure of Link, does not feature Armos. It is the only main Zelda game to not do so, but the Iron Knuckle knights serve the same role at palace entrances (they also serve the Darknut role inside palaces). Some knight statues that can be brought to life by Link's sword, while others drop a red magic bottle to provide a full magic refill.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, Armos only appear in the Eastern Palace area, standing dormant until bumped into, which causes it to bounce towards Link. Unactivated Armos are grey, oval-shaped statues, but change to light brown when awakened. Certain skull-like rocks in the Dark World will animate if they are touched, which behave similarly to the Armos.

Armos Knights/Death ArmosEdit

Armos Knights are the boss of the Eastern Palace, bouncing around in formations. They are similar to other Armos, but are bigger and blue. They can each be defeated by three arrows or several sword strikes; the final Armos Knight will become a Death Armos, which is red in color. It will angrily stomp around the room, trying to crush Link. They also appear as a mini boss in Ganon's Tower, and can be defeated with a single silver arrow

Link's AwakeningEdit

In Link's Awakening, Armos and one single Armos Knight appear in the Face Shrine and in the shrine to the south. The Armos are similar to those from The Legend of Zelda, except these do not move as fast. They often hide among similar looking statues. Many statues resembling Armos form a maze near the shrine to the south of the Face Shrine, but one in a few are true Armos. Each wall has one Armos that must be found to reach the Shrine.

Armos KnightsEdit

Inside the Shrine, an Armos Knight guards the Face Key. His main attack is slamming the ground to paralyze his foes.

Ocarina of Time/Majora's MaskEdit

In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, Armos mostly appear in dungeons, and are giant, grey, aged statues, that look somewhat like chess pieces. Some look the same as regular inanimate statues, making them more dangerous. Actual statues can be pushed around, but Armos Knights attack when approached. A bomb or the Megaton Hammer will destroy one. When defeated, they will jump wildly around the place and explode. In Majora's Mask, Armos only appear in the Stone Tower Temple.

Death ArmosEdit

Also in Majora's Mask, the Death Armos appears again in Stone Tower Temple, albeit with a different look than in A Link to the Past. The Death Armos appears as a floating statue with a light sensitive panel on each of its four sides. When one of these panels is struck by a Light Arrow, the Armos turns upside down. Death Armos attack by attempting to crush Link, but a Death Armos that attacks while flipped smashes its own head and explodes.

Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of AgesEdit

In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Armos Knights are exactly as those from Link's Awakening, as Flagship built upon data from that game. They are in no specific area, and as in Link's Awakening, they can be destroyed with a Boomerang, or a bomb. Swords are ineffective unless paralyzed by a boomerang.

Armos WarriorEdit

There is a mini-boss in the fourth dungeon of Oracle of Ages named "Armos Warrior". He throws his sword, which locks onto Link before returning. The only way to damage him is to strike him from behind. Eventually his shield breaks and he begins charging at Link. Link must dodge the charge, letting the Armos Warrior hit the wall and become stunned, making him vulnerable to attack.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Wind Waker, Armos come in small and large forms. When Link enters a room, the small Armos activate and bounce quickly towards Link. They can be paralyzed by an arrow in the eye and striking the crystal on the back will cause them to spin around wildly and self-destruct (note: the arrow isn't a necessary weapon, it makes it easier to access the weak point).

Armos KnightsEdit

The Armos Knights are gigantic statues that will slowly bounce towards Link when he approaches. To defeat one, Link must throw a bomb into its mouth, which opens occasionally, or can be made to open by shooting its eye. After the bomb has been thrown, the Armos Knight spins around and self-destructs.

The Minish CapEdit

The Armos in The Minish Cap are slightly different from previous Armos. While reminiscent of Armos from Link's Awakening, they are powered by flames inside their heads, and only a Minish-sized being can turn the flame off. Their figurine mentions that the Armos where created by the Minish for the Wind Tribe. When Link approaches, the Armos usually activates and quickly runs towards him, occasionally pausing. Sometimes Link must activate an Armos to clear a path and other times he must deactivate one to prevent it from blocking a path.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Armos in Twilight Princess wield hammers and look very different from those in previous incarnations, probably most resembling Moai statues on Easter Island. When animated, their facial features are clearly outlined by a glowing blue color. As in The Wind Waker, they are defeated by striking the weak spot on its rear. A bomb arrow will instantly send an armos into self-destruct mode, as will a clout from the animated statue Link must guide through the Temple of Time.

Interestingly, one of the beta enemies was called an "Armos Titan," but never made it into the final version.

Phantom HourglassEdit

In Phantom Hourglass, there appears to be statue-like foes resembling Armos in both the single-player dungeons.

Soul Calibur IIEdit

It is significant that in Soul Calibur II for the GameCube, one of the weapons Link can purchase (for 900 gold) is called "Armos Series," and it resembles the ovular shield of stone and short sword of the Ocarina of Time Armos. When used, the weapons put Link's offense at 100% and his defense at 70%, making it the second worst weapon Link has (the first being the Bug-Catching Net with Hylian Shield). As a side effect, offense increases with soul charge, but soul charge effect slowly decreases. The shield has the worst defense of Link's weapons, which isn't surprising when one considers how easy it is for Link to hurt an Armos, sometimes with only his sword.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/ChuChu

File:Chuchu group.jpg
A group of various ChuChus.

A ChuChu is one of the many enemies in The Legend of Zelda series. ChuChus are gelatinous creatures that come in many different colors, shapes, and forms.[1] In most cases, when one is destroyed, it will leave behind what is called Chu Jelly which can be stored in Empty Bottles.[1] Each color of Chu Jelly will affect Link in a different way when it is drunk. The consequences usually effect Link's hearts or magic meter, but other uses have been seen.

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of Zelda: Majora's MaskEdit

ChuChus are a species similar to Gels that are often found in Termina Fields as Red and Green ChuChus. If they are carrying something, it is visible in their insides. They hop towards their prey when someone gets too close. The main variants are Red, Blue, Yellow and Green. Red contains a heart (although it would give Link a Green Rupee if his health was full), yellow contains arrows, and green contains small magic jars. Blue contains nothing, but can be frozen with the ice arrow to form a block. In this form they have short, fat bodies and eyes that rest on tall stalks. They resemble tinted bottles, and on the fat body area there is a large mouth that does not seem to open.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind WakerEdit

ChuChus have evolved since their appearance in Majora's Mask. They resemble a combination of Gels and Buzz Blobs. Oddly enough, they are quite similar now to the Pokémon Wobbuffet. They are now completely filled in, whereas their Majora's Mask counterparts were translucent. Like Majora's Mask's ChuChus, they hop at any creature that comes near them.

ChuChu Jelly is the main ingredient of Potions.

VarietiesEdit

  • ChuChus mostly come in Red and Green, with Green being able to hide as a pool.
  • Another form of the ChuChu is the Blue ChuChu, which are very rare, and give off electricity. They appear mostly on the small, generally deserted islands of the Great Sea. Their jelly is limited to 20, as there are only 20 Blue ChuChus in the game; they themselves will always come back, but will not drop jelly more than once apiece.
  • Some Dungeons have Yellow ChuChus, who also give off electricity, and produce red and green Jelly.
  • In later dungeons the player will find Shadow ChuChus, which are dark purple in colour, who must be turned to stone by beams of light (and if you move them away from the light, or the light away from them for too long they'd eventually return to their dark purple state) from the Mirror Shield or Medli's harp then picked up and thrown to be destroyed. Hitting them with the sword will make them break apart and immediately reform. When turned to rocks they can also be defeated by breaking them with the Skull Hammer.

The Legend of Zelda: The Minish CapEdit

File:Chuchu Giant The Minish Cap.png
Giant ChuChu bearing down on Link

ChuChus remain relatively the same as in The Wind Waker, except that now, Chu Jelly isn't the main ingredient of Potions. A new addition to the ChuChu family is the Spiny ChuChu, a gray ChuChu who can generate spikes to hurt Link and defend itself. The gray ChuChu can be stunned using bombs, a Spin attack or Hurricane attack or the Boomerang, and can subsequently be killed far more easily. There are also red ChuChus with rock helmets making them invulnerable with them on.

Giant ChuChuEdit

A giant Green ChuChu appears as a boss in The Minish Cap, in the first dungeon, Deepwood Shrine. While not actually a giant, it appears very large from the perspective of the Minish-sized Link at that point in the game. A similar giant Blue ChuChu appears later on as a mini-boss in the fourth dungeon.

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight PrincessEdit

Red, Purple, Blue, Yellow, and Rare ChuChus (now simply called "Chus") return in Twilight Princess, as faceless, amorphous slug-shaped gelatinous creatures. They move on their stomachs rather than stand upright as in previous incarnations, and can merge together (and subsequently split when attacked) to form larger, single creatures. Their Chu Jelly can again be collected, however it is consumable immediately after collection, unlike The Wind Waker, where it has to be made into Potions first. Like most bottled goods, each Chu Jelly the player receives can only be used once.

Bottling Chu JellyEdit

Link can scoop up, in a bottle, the Chu Jelly that remains when they are defeated.

  • Red Chu Jelly is identical to Red Potion, which restores eight hearts worth of health.
  • Blue Chu Jelly is identical to Blue Potion and restores all hearts.
  • Yellow Chu Jelly can be used in place of lantern oil in order to replenish it with fuel.
  • Purple Chu Jelly causes random effects on health (similar to consuming a bottled Poe spirit in Ocarina of Time). It will either restore one heart, restore all hearts, take away one heart, or take away all but one quarter of one heart.
  • Rare Chu Jelly is identical to Great Fairy's Tears, in that it restores all hearts and doubles sword damage for about 15 seconds.

Combinations and Green ChusEdit

Damage inflicted on a large Chu can break it up into two smaller ones, and Chus can continue to be halved until they are small enough to kill.

A negative side effect of this is that, given enough time, the smaller Chus can combine again into larger Chus. If two Chus of different color combine, they will turn purple (and cannot be separated into their original colors again).

The exception to this rule is if a blue and yellow Chu combine - they create a green Chu, whose jelly is supposed to refill magic. However, the magic system was removed from Twilight Princess at some point before release, so the green Chu jelly has no effect. In the GameCube version of the game, combining a yellow and blue Chu will merely make a purple Chu. This can only be done in the Cave of Ordeals.

Black ChusEdit

There is also a mysterious black Chu jelly that can only be obtained in the Nintendo GameCube version of Twilight Princess with an Action Replay cheat device. It takes away Link's hearts, anywhere from one to all of them. Black Chus attack with a lunge. The jelly is similar to the Nasty Soup which can be scooped from Coro's pot in Faron Woods.

Phantom HourglassEdit

Red, Yellow, Stone, Green and Blue ChuChus appear in Phantom Hourglass, in a very similar form to how they appear in the prequel to the game, The Wind Waker.

Red ChuChus are always vulnerable to any attack. A Stone ChuChu is simply a Red ChuChu with a stone covering, with must be blown up by a bomb in order for it to become vulnerable. Yellow ChuChus are "electrified" and will shock the player, causing damage, when struck at while they are in this state. However, after a few seconds, their electric barrier will diminish, allowing the player to attack. Blue ChuChus are very simillar in the way they wield electricity, but don't drop their barrier unless hit by a long-range attack, such as a boomerang or arrow. Green ChuChus collapse for protection when struck at and can't be hurt in that state. They rarely appear in this game.

ReferencesEdit

  1. a b Nintendo (January 1, 2006). "The Great Hyrule Encyclopedia - ChuChu". Zelda Universe. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/c.jsp#ChuChu. Retrieved 2007-06-03.  Invalid <ref> tag; name "pedia" defined multiple times with different content
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Darknut

File:Darknut.jpg
A Darknut from Legend of Zelda

A Darknut (タートナック, Taatonakku) is a armored knight enemy that appears in The Legend of Zelda series of video games.[1] Typically, the thick armor and sturdy shield of a Darknut renders it nearly invulnerable from the front, forcing Link to circle around and strike it from behind.

Darknuts are very similar to another Zelda enemy, the Iron Knuckle. In the Japanese versions, Darknut is called "タートナック" (taatonakku) which is noticeably similar to the Japanese name of Iron Knuckle, "アイアンナック" (aiannakku).[citation needed] It is apparent these two enemies are related, especially in the first two Zelda games, in which they shared similar designs and purposes.

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

In the original The Legend of Zelda, the Darknut's seemingly random movement and high damage capability make them a significant obstacle. The challenge is only compounded by the fact that they frequently appear in groups. The original Darknuts are monsters that attack in the traditional manner of attempting to touch Link, but are much more difficult to fight than other enemies with this attack pattern since they can only be damaged from the side or the rear. Their armor also renders them invulnerable to projectile attacks. Blue Darknuts have double the offensive and defensive capabilities and can move faster than the red ones.

A Link to the PastEdit

The Castle Knights can be considered this game's version of the Darknuts, only they are not exactly monsters, but the knights and guards controlled by the magic of the evil wizard Agahnim. In the beginning of the game there are gold version holding shields that are friendly to Link, with one of them pointing out that they are slowly being brainwashed. The colors of their armor vary from green, blue and red and their difficulty increases in that order. Green Soldiers are sometimes armed with daggers rather than swords and sometimes use bows whilst hiding in bushes, Blue Soldiers use swords or bows and Red Soldiers use spears. Stronger than the normal guards are Knights, which wear different helmets and are somewhat stronger. Red Knights can use bombs and throw spears. The strongest type of guards is the Ball & Chain Soldiers, which come in Silver and Gold varieties. At the end of the game they are seen normal and unmasked.

Link's AwakeningEdit

They next appear in Link's Awakening, as much weaker versions of their past selves. These are called Soldiers in the English version, but their Japanese names are still Darknuts. They attack with swords, shields, and arrows.

Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of AgesEdit

Darknuts in Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages appear the same as in Link's Awakening.

Four Swords and Four Swords AdventuresEdit

Darknuts appear in Four Swords and Four Swords Adventures as an occasional mini-boss.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Wind Waker, Darknuts are much slower and more intimidating, carry armor differing in design and color in order to denote rank. The weakest Darknuts wear silver armor and carry only a gigantic greatsword, while the highest-ranking Darknuts wear black or red armor with a cape, a stylized helmet, and a shield. Unlike being a mini-boss in most games, Darknuts in the Wind Waker appear as a semi-common enemy in the 2nd half of the game.

File:07A Mighty Darknut.jpg
A "Mighty" Darknut

Darknuts can be stripped of their armor through well-placed attacks, counter-attacks, and use of the Grappling Hook or Fire Arrows. Once its helmet is removed, the Darknut's face is shown to resemble that of a wolf or a jackal. The Darknut's greatsword can be taken by Link and used as a powerful (even if clumsy) weapon, which can even break certain stone pillars. Darknuts will attempt to pick up any available weapons if they are disarmed. If no weapons are available, they will continue to attack with their bare hands, and are apt to dodge attacks if their body armor has been removed. These Darknuts easily break out when frozen by the Ice Arrows, though Link can still shatter them with quick use of the Skull Hammer. They occasionally use a move similar to Link's jump attack, which will take off a whopping 3 hearts if it connects. They drop rare "Knight's Crests", proof that they are advanced enough to perform the "Hurricane Spin".

The Minish CapEdit

Darknuts (rendered "Dark Nuts" on their figurine) occasionally appear as sub-bosses in The Minish Cap. They appear like their The Wind Waker counterparts, but removing their armor is neither possible nor necessary. All normal Darknuts wear white armor (with either green or red trim), carry shields, and can only be harmed while opening its guard or by being attacked from behind. They attack either by slashing, performing a dashing stab, or using a charged unblockable stab. The game also contains a slightly stronger red-armored Darknut named "Red Dark Nut" and a black-armored Darknut named "Black Knight", who is the strongest Darknut and is faced in the final dungeon. Black Knight first attacks by itself, and later along with two Red Dark Nuts.

Twilight PrincessEdit

File:06A Darknut.jpg
A fully armored Darknut

A Darknut first appears as a mini-boss in the sixth dungeon, the Temple of Time, in Twilight Princess, and later as a high-level enemy. They are differentiated by the shade of their armor, coming in black, red, blue, copper, silver, and gold varieties. They are also found in the Cave of Ordeals, as well as Hyrule Castle. They are also very tall, being roughly twice the height of Link.

Like in The Wind Waker, Darknuts are well-armored, and lose their armor as Link lands hits on them. Bombs are also effective at removing their armor, particularly on groups of them (though the bombs are useless once the armor is completely gone). They are armed with either greatswords (though used with one hand) or giant maces, accompanied with a shield. This shield is very potent and can fend off any of Link's attacks and all of his weapons. Once its outer armor and shield has fallen off, the Darknut throws its weapon at Link and unsheathes a smallsword. Unarmored Darknuts are highly adept at blocking Link's attacks, although certain powerful techniques can beat down their guard. Later in the game, in Hyrule Castle, the player can choose to fight two of these foes at once, both wielding mace. Darknuts have arguably the best A.I. in the entire game, as they can block or dodge nearly every attack, even sidestepping Bomblings in their armorless state, while dealing swift counterblows. At the final floor of the 'Cave of Ordeals' (Found in Gerudo Mesa) Link must fight three of these enemies at once (or four when completing the Cave for a second time), which can only be accomplished by very experienced players.

Phantom HourglassEdit

In the Temple of the Ocean King, Bellum, the primary antagonist, uses some of his power to create Darknut-like creatures called Phantoms which are invulnerable to all weapons, save for the legendary Phantom Sword and Hero's Bow, but the bow will only stun it temporarily. At the game's climax, Bellum possesses Linebeck and turns him into a sword-wielding Phantom, whom Link is forced to fight. The possessed Linebeck behaves quite similarly to Darknuts in past games, slowly advancing toward Link and blocking most of his attacks. Its own moves are extremely powerful, but it shares the same weakness as its Phantom cousins, namely the eye on its back.

Link's Crossbow TrainingEdit

A Darknut appears as one of two Bosses in Link's Crossbow Training. He is fought in the third part of the 8th level. It is fought in "Ranger" mode where Link can move freely using the control stick on the nunchuck, and must be destroyed within the time limit (Although he does not need to be destroyd to achieve a bronze medal, required to go onto the Final level) its appearance is identical to its Twilight Princess incarnation.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Nintendo (January 1, 2006). ""Darknuts" at the official "Great Hyrule Encyclopedia"". Zelda Universe. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/d.jsp#Darknuts. Retrieved 2007-06-11. 
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Deku Baba

Deku Babas are a fictional species of enemy that appears in the Legend of Zelda series. They are carnivorous plants, with a venus fly trap-like mouth, and sprout from the ground whenever their roots detect any potential prey. They are known to lash out at an enemy with no provocation (possibly for food, like a Venus fly trap). Sometimes, their stems can be used to fashion Deku Sticks. They also sometimes contain Deku Seeds that are dropped when they die.

Deku Babas by gameEdit

Ocarina of Time and Majora's MaskEdit

In Ocarina of Time, there are two main variations of Deku Babas. The first kind will shoot straight up (wiggling occasionally) and will yield Deku Sticks once "killed". However, the roots will remain, allowing the Deku Baba to regenerate (these are usually found in areas where a Deku Stick is required, as they can produce an infinite number of Deku Sticks). The second kind will lunge at Link and will be stunned by an attack. If killed normally, it will yield a Deku Nut. If stunned, it will produce a Deku Stick. Unlike the previous kind, these cannot regenerate.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Deku Babas in this game are similar to the second variation in Ocarina of Time/Majora's Mask. However, if they hit Link, they will grab him in their jaws.

Related CreaturesEdit

Baba Serpent/Hebi BabaEdit

Baba Serpents are only found in Twilight Princess. They look like regular Deku Babas with an orange coloration. Once the stem is cut, however, it will either crawl around and attempt to clamp its jaws onto Link, or, if Link is too far away, it will reattach itself to the roots.

Big BabaEdit

Big Babas are massive variations of the Deku Baba found in Twilight Princess. They, too, are orange in color. They are Baba Serpents and Deku Likes combined. Once the head is killed, it will be destroyed, but the base will remain. The base will open up, allowing Link to throw a bomb into the mouth and kill the Big Baba.

Big Deku BabaEdit

In Ocarina of Time, a larger, stronger species terrorized the village where the Kokiri lived. Link was able to remove them after destroying Phantom Ganon, an evil being created by Ganondorf, in the Forest Temple. All Big Deku Babas in the village were destroyed after that (the ones in the Forest Temple, however, remained). In this game, if destroyed normally, they would drop three Deku nuts. However, if they were slain when stunned by a Deku nut, the Hookshot, or sword attack, they would yield a Deku Stick.

Bio Deku BabaEdit

Bio Deku Baba are vicious plants are located in the Great Bay and Stone Tower Temples, and can only be taken out by one hit with a Powder Keg or a very precise throw of Zora Link's fins. Anything else will sever the stem, allowing the plant to walk freely around its environment. On land this can be very irritating and difficult to time with any form of attack, although the sword works best, while underwater Zora Link's barrier attack is the best option.

Boko BabaEdit

In The Wind Waker, no Deku Babas appear. Instead, a larger and more vicious kind of Baba called Boko Babas appeared. At a distance, they resemble Baba Buds, but if Link comes closer the head emerges and attempts to eat him. They are destroyed by stunning them with a jump-attack and then cutting the stem, which forms a Boko Stick. After obtaining the Boomerang, if you fire it at a Boko Baba it will die instantly. They can also be killed by several shots with the Hero's Bow. They appear mainly in the Forest Haven and Forbidden Woods. They usually drop their seeds after they are defeated. In the Forest Haven, there is a Korok who can make a Blue Potion (which restores all health and magic) with four of them if Link is carrying an empty bottle.

DiababaEdit

File:DiababaForm1.jpg
Twilit Parasite, Diababa, in its first form.

The boss of the Forest Temple in Twilight Princess. In the first form, two large Deku Baba heads come out of a pool of a toxic purple liquid. Link must use the Gale Boomerang to transport a Bombling to the head. In the second form, a third, even larger head comes out with an eye on its tongue. Ook will carry a Bombling that Link must again use the Gale Boomerang to hit the head, causing it to reveal its eye. Link must then slash the eye repeatedly with the sword.

Mini BabaEdit

This species of Deku Baba is exclusive to Majora's Mask. They act very much like the unaggresive, regenerating species of Deku Baba. However, this form has no stem and thus will only yield Deku Nuts.

Twilit Deku BabaEdit

Twilit versions of Deku Babas in Twilight Princess. They are almost identical to the Deku Babas or Baba Serpents of that game, except for their color. Their colour stays the same, and the only way to distinguish which Baba (Deku or Serpent) they are is only how they react to getting their stems cut.

TriviaEdit

  • Deku Babas are similar to the Piranha Plants from the Mario series.
  • "Deku" means "wooden figurine", and Deku Babas are likely called that to emphasize they are plants. "Hebi" means "snake", and Hebi Babas are likely called that to emphasize their snakelike behaviour when cut off. However, "Boko" doesn't mean anything and it is unclear why Boko Babas are called what they are called (although it should be noted that enemies called "Bokoblins" appear that wield "Boko" Sticks).
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Dodongo

Dodongos are a fictional race of dinosaur-like creatures in the Legend of Zelda series. They first appeared as minibosses in the original Legend of Zelda for the Nintendo Entertainment System, accompanied by the famous phrase "DODONGO DISLIKES SMOKE" (a clue to use bombs to destroy them). They have caused all kinds of trouble throughout the series, including pestering the Goron race in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time.

Although there was only one form of triceratops-like Dodongo in the original Legend of Zelda, there are many forms of Dodongo in Ocarina of Time and later: First, there is the baby form, in which the beasts can try to run into the enemy in numbers to subdue it.

There are five types of mature Dodongos:

1. First there are those that breathe fire and are mountain based, they also lash their tail whenever struck by an intruder, hoping to knock away the intruder from behind.

2. Similar to the species above, except they are susceptible to bombs when opening their mouth, stunning them for a few seconds. They are also a bit larger.

3. This species is rarely seen, and can swim in water and even up humongous waterfalls with its powerful muscles. An example of this is the Dodongo Link befriends in The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages and The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons.

4. Another rare specimen, called King Dodongo, is the ruler of all Dodongos in Hyrule. He is much larger than any other Dodongo specimen.

5. This species is different from all the rest, on account of the fact that they are snakelike in appearance and have no visible eyes. They can be forced into eating bombs, which eventually causes them to explode from the inside out.



Enemies/Floormaster

Floormasters are enemies in some Legend of Zelda games

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Floormasters are enemies in the game The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. They take the form of dead hands with clawlike fingernails.

Floormasters are rather difficult to defeat at first. When a Floormaster is attacked it will separate into three mini-Floormasters. They need to be destroyed before they unite. If a smaller monster manages to grab the player after two are destroyed, it turns into a new Floormaster. The spin attack or Din's Fire is especially useful as mini-Floormasters tend to blindly run into Link after retreating. If a Floormaster turns green, it is invincible. Link will need to stay away from it until it goes back to its normal color, or defend himself with his shield. Some Floormasters are invisible, so Link needs the Lens of Truth to see them, disabling the use of the spin attack or Din's Fire.

They are related to the Wallmaster, a giant hand that dwells on the ceiling.

Majora's MaskEdit

Floormasters appear in this game too, in Ikana's castle. In this game the sunlight is their major weakness and will be harmed upon contact. They can be also beaten by reflecting light via the Mirror Shield onto them.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, they are black hands with a violet glow around them. They reside in small holes on the floors of the Earth and Wind Temples, but are also found in smaller, mini-dungeons throughout the Great Sea (such as on Needle Rock Isle). There is one in the Forsaken Fortress as well. However, these holes are different - they move, wiggle, and perpetually suck inward as would a black hole. Their personality according to their figurine is surprisingly lonely.

A Floormaster's attack in this game is very similar to the Wallmaster's attack in The Ocarina of Time. They will try to grab Link and take him to a previous room, this will also happen to a partner. However, you will be able to see the Floormaster's hole before you are attacked. They can also pick up nearby objects and throw them at Link, including bombs you drop.

The Minish CapEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap, they are Large blue glowing hands. waiting long enough in a room that they are in may result in them coming after you. they don't have very many attacks, and there are also wallmasters.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Gohma

File:Normal gohma.jpg
Queen Gohma in Ocarina of Time

Gohma is a monster and a recurring boss character in The Legend of Zelda series of video games, where the player fights it as the protagonist, Link. Although Gohma's appearance is different in every game, it is always a giant cyclopic arthropod and its eye is always its weak point. In the non-canon CD-i titles it bore a strong resemblance to an Alaskan King Crab.

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

In the The Legend of Zelda, the first game of the series, Gohma is a boss creature, appearing as a large, one-eyed arthropod that shoots fireballs at Link. It has a wide shell on its back making it look somewhat like a crab. Gohma could be harmed only by shooting arrows at its eye when it opens. Gohma has two variations. One is orange and takes a single shot by a normal arrow to defeat it. The other is the same size and shape, but is blue and takes three shots from a normal arrow to defeat it. Since one rupee is required to shoot an arrow, it is possible that the player could run out of rupees during the battle with Gohma, and if this is the case they must leave the room to collect more. Most other boss battle rooms in this game do not have this feature, the only other being the smoke-hating Dodongo. In the first quest, the red Gohma is the boss of level six and blue Gohma makes an appearance in level eight. In the second Quest, the blue Gohma appears in levels five, six, and seven, and acts as the boss of level six as well.

Link's AwakeningEdit

In Link's Awakening, multiple Gohmas appeared as a sub-boss in the Catfish's Maw. They would jump back and forth with their eyes closed, and would only be vulnerable to the Hookshot when they were open. They can either lunge forward or diagonally, and when they open their eyes, a projectile will soon follow, but if attacked soon enough the effect is canceled.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Gohma is the first boss Link battles. In this game it is referred to as Parasitic Armored Arachnid: Gohma, and is a giant crab-like enemy used by Ganondorf to curse the Great Deku Tree when he was denied the Kokiri Emerald. Link is requested by the Great Deku Tree to rid him of Gohma. Inside, there are several Deku Scrubs who swear allegiance to the Queen Gohma until they are defeated by Link, at which point they reveal the creature's weakness to him.

Eventually Link reaches Gohma's lair deep inside the Great Deku Tree. The battle does not commence until Link spots her glowing red eye high on the ceiling, at which point it manipulates its legs to look like a mutated hand with an eye ball in the center; upon further inspection, however, it does still have its arthropod appearance. After attack, it will retreat to the ceiling to spawn eggs that drop and quickly hatch into Gohma Larvae, small Gohmas that were encountered as enemies earlier in the dungeon.

Link battles and destroys Gohma, but the Great Deku Tree reveals that Gohma had done too much damage to him already, and soon dies.

Gohma LarvaEdit

Gohma Larvae are the offspring of the Queen Gohma. They only have two legs (no arms or additional legs), one eye, and appear to be sprouting something atop of their head. They attack by lunging at Link.

Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In this game, Gohma is a giant, cyclopean fiddler crab that guards Soothing Rain in the Dancing Dragon Dungeon. It attacks by swinging its claw at Link and by birthing larvae that will stick to Link and slow him down.

The Wind WakerEdit

File:Gohma WW.jpg
Gohma in The Wind Waker

Gohma serves as the boss of Dragon Roost Cavern in The Wind Waker, where it had been harassing the dragon Valoo, disturbing the order on Dragon Roost Island. This version of Gohma is the most unusual of it's kind, since this Gohma appears more like a cross between a centipede and scorpion, with a hard carapace. This version of Gohma is a larger and more powerful version of an enemy from the game, the Magtail, a species of scorpion/centipede hybrids that reside in lava and also have one eye. Gohma attacks by trying to crush Link with its body, or breathing fire at him. Link fights back by using his Grappling Hook on Valoo's tail, which in turn makes a part of the rocky ceiling fall down on Gohma, crushing some of its carapace. It is later fought again (in black and white) in Ganon's Tower.

Four Sword AdventuresEdit

In the Four Sword Adventures Gohma appears in two variations. The first type is a large, one-eyed arachnid that aimlessly wanders about the fields of Hyrule. The second type also appears as a large, one-eyed arachnid, but acts as a mini-boss that shoots fireballs at Link.

Twilight PrincessEdit

File:Armogohma.jpg
Armogohma in Twilight Princess

In Twilight Princess, Gohma goes by the name of Twilit Arachnid: Armogohma, and appears as a giant spider with an eyeball located in its back. Its name is most likely a mix of "armor" and "Gohma", as it seems the creature is wearing some kind of armor on its main body around its eye. Such an assumption gains strength after the first form of Armogohma is defeated. It is found in the Temple of Time, the sixth dungeon in the game. This version of Gohma is hairy and has eight legs, heavily resembling a huntsman spider or tarantula. Its single eye can shoot a fiery laser. Armogohma can also lay dozens of eggs, which hatch to reveal small spider-like enemies, known as Baby Gohma. Upon getting its body destroyed, Armogohma's eyeball reveals itself to be a small spider of its own, and tries to escape along with some of its spawn. Link then kills it, and it releases the third shard of the Mirror of Twilight.

Young GohmaEdit

Young Gohmas are presumably the offspring of Armogohma, and are common enemies in the Temple of Time. They are roughly human-sized, one-eyed spiders (resembling tarantulas, like their adult counterpart) with four legs. They attack by ramming Link.

Baby GohmaEdit

Baby Gohma are the offspring of Armogohma. They are incredibly weak, easily being killed with even the Slingshot. Although they all look the same, they act differently depending on where they are fought. When they are fought as normal enemies, they will run away from Link when he faces them, but will attack him from behind. When Armogohma spawns Baby Gohmas after taking damage, this litter will attack Link aggressively, whether or not he is facing them. The last variation is formed when Armogohma's body is destroyed, leaving only Armogohma's eye. They crowd around their parent, running away from Link with the eye. Interestingly, Baby Gohmas greatly resemble Mitites from Pikmin 2.

TV seriesEdit

Gohma made at least one minor appearance on the television series adaptation of The Legend of Zelda series. On the TV show, however, Gohma was a large, blue crab-like creature, very similar to the Tektites. Like its other incarnations, its eye was its main weakness. In the episode "Cold Spells" Ganon attempts to feed Zelda and Link to Gohma, which behaves a lot like a tamed pet, but Link manages to trick Ganon into destroying Gohma by dodging a fire attack meant for him and causing it to hit Gohma in the eye, destroying it. In another episode, "Stinging a Stinger", Ganon attempts to feed Zelda, Link, and another character named Sleeze Nose to Gohma, but Link and Zelda manages to defeat this one. In the final episode, "The Moblins are Revolting", two Gohmas made a small appearance carrying the Evil Jar.

External linksEdit

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Iron Knuckle

An Iron Knuckle (アイアンナック, Aiannakku) is an enemy in The Legend of Zelda video game series. A massive armored foe, they are often confused with the similar Darknut and Armos. Although they wielded swords and shields in the earlier games they now typically appear armed with a large labrys. They typically remain still and motionless, but when an intruder is detected, an Iron Knuckle will come to life and mercilessly strike.[1]

Zelda II: Adventure of LinkEdit

The Iron Knuckle first appeared in The Adventure of Link in three colors - orange, red, and blue, in order of difficulty. Each is armed with a sword and shield, and able to block attacks. They are often considered the toughest non-boss enemy in the game, since their swords are quite powerful and their shields are capable of blocking Link's sword from almost any position he can swing from. Additionally, their helmets can successfully deflect most attacks from above.

The stronger Blue Iron Knuckles can throw swords. In some instances, they enter battle on a floating metal horse, wielding a lance. After dehorsed, they behave as slightly stronger versions of the normal Blue Iron Knuckles. These mounted Blue Iron Knuckles were also known as Rebo Knuckles or Rebonacks (from the Japanese rebonakku, whereas Iron Knuckle is aiannakku), and are treated as either bosses or mini-bosses.

Ocarina of Time and Majora's MaskEdit

In both Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, Iron Knuckles attacked with a monstrous axe that did massive damage to Link. This axe, however, is fairly slow and can sometimes get stuck in the ground for a few seconds, giving Link a better chance at a counterattack. The Iron Knuckle's swings would also destroy stone pillars in the rooms where he was encountered. After several blows, the Iron Knuckle's armor would partially fall off and, as a result of losing some of the added weight, give the Knuckle greater mobility. After losing its armor, the Iron Knuckle would become vulnerable to arrows, which would simply bounce off it before. In Ocarina of Time, there are four variants of Iron Knuckle: Silver, Black, White and the one Nabooru appears as. In Majora's Mask there were three that were Silver, Black and White.

Familiar facesEdit

Iron Knuckles seem to share similarities with several other enemies seen in the Zelda series. The most noticeable are the Darknuts. Both Iron Knuckles and Darknuts are knight-like enemies that wear heavy armor and are incredibly strong and durable. Also, in the 3D Zelda games, players are able to strip the armor off of both enemies (Iron Knuckles shed their armor as they take damage, while Darknut armor can be removed by executing different kinds of parry attacks or attacking from the rear).

A key difference between the two enemies (in later Zelda titles) is that Iron Knuckles are often referred to as animated suits of armor, whereas Darknuts are some type of creature (depicted as man or beast, depending on the game) wearing a suit of armor.

The Castle Guards from A Link to the Past are another similar enemy but, again, the Castle Guards are also clearly human soldiers wearing heavy armor.

In Oracle of Seasons, Onox is strikingly similar in appearance to an Iron Knuckle, and even has Gerudo colors that are visible in the cloth he wears underneath the armor, he also is seen having the symbol of the Gerudo's on his chest plate.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Nintendo (January 1, 2006). "The Great Hyrule Encyclopedia - Iron Knuckle". Zelda Universe. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/i.jsp#IronKnuckle. Retrieved 2007-06-03. 
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Keese

Keese are fictional bat monsters from The Legend of Zelda series of video games, and have appeared in almost every game in the series to date. Keese are often found in caves and dungeons, and sometimes even found in the overworld. They usually have black skin, and fly towards Link.

HistoryEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Keese appear in every dungeon throughout the game, and often litter areas in those dungeons. They fly around the screen, not heading towards anything in particular, and stop for a short amount of time.

There are three colors of Keese:

  • Blue, the most common.
  • Red, which appear in pairs when a Vire is harmed but not killed.
  • Black, which appear in the more advanced dungeons.

Unusual for the Zelda games (where color usually indicates the enemy's level of difficulty), the different colors of Keese have the same abilities, statistics, and movement patterns.

The Adventure of Link and A Link to the PastEdit

In both games, Keese take a similar approach in their attacks — they only move when Link gets close (in The Adventure of Link, they are instead called Aches). They aren't as common an enemy as they were in the original Legend of Zelda. They stay dormant, and fly around only when they are approached, stopping after a while. In A Link to the Past's Dark World, Keese are replaced with winged eyeballs, which behave similarly, but with a vastly different appearance.

Link's AwakeningEdit

Keese return to their roots in this game, taking on a darker color, like in The Legend of Zelda. They are similar to their original form, being weak and moving around randomly. There are also larger Keese that only appear during the fight with the Grim Creeper, the sub-boss of the seventh dungeon, and are stronger than regular Keese. The Vire in Turtle Rock, when destroyed, turns into Big Keese that fly into Link and leave quickly.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Keese are black, yellow-eyed bats, found mostly in dungeons. Whenever one sees Link, it will swoop down at him to attack. Regular Keese can become Fire or Ice Keese if they come in contact with either of the elements.

Majora's MaskEdit

Keese remain exactly the same in Majora's Mask as they did in Ocarina of Time, including being mostly found in dungeons. There are larger forms of Keese that are found outside called Bad Bats, which act the same, but are stronger.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

Keese are the same as they were in Link's Awakening, on account of the fact that Flagship used the original "formula" to make Keese. However, they are a lot more erratic . One form of Keese that appears in these games is the Fire Keese, similar to the Fire Keese of past games. Any Keese that encounters fire will become one. They fly higher in the air than regular Keese, and swoop down on their enemies. Big Keese sometimes accompany the enemy Blue Stalfos.

The Wind WakerEdit

Keese appear more like vampire bats in this game, flying faster than before. They are usually found in dungeons, and also appear as Fire Keese. Unlike other Keese, they do not head straight into their enemy; they wait and prepare to strike.

The Minish CapEdit

Keese slowly fly around dark caves and dungeons, with no real pattern of movement.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Regular, Fire, and Ice Keese return in Twilight Princess. This time around, they have a long tail with a hook on the end, and their attack pattern is similar to that in The Wind Waker.

Phantom HourglassEdit

Regular, Fire, and Ice Keese also appear in Phantom Hourglass. They commonly appear in caves and look very much like their counterparts in The Wind Waker.

VariationsEdit

AcheEdit

Although Keese do not appear in The Adventure of Link, Aches, a similar species of bats, do. Though usually found in forests and caves, Aches are occasionally found in towns. They hang at the top of the screen, waiting for Link to pass, and dive down to attack. It should be noted that the official name of these enemies is actually Ache, but they behave like Keese in almost every respect, so they are often confused with them. In certain towns, some Aches disguise themselves as villagers and attack Link when he tries to talk to them, breaking their disguise. These are commonly referred to as the "Eyes of Ganon".

AchemanEdit

Acheman are Red Aches that fly down and turn into a red goblin-like creature. They are only able to transform into this state when on solid ground, and shoot fireballs from their mouths at their prey.

Bad BatEdit

Bad Bats are larger variants of Keese found in Majora's Mask. They seem to prefer outdoor environments, as opposed to the cave or dungeon-dwelling Keese. Bad Bats can even be found during the day.

Battle BatEdit

Battle Bats are Keese are found in Link's Awakening, and are stronger than normal Keese. The only six Battle Bats found in the game are fought during the fight against the seventh dungeon sub-boss, the Grim Creeper.

Fire KeeseEdit

When Keese are exposed to an open flame, they can transform into Fire Keese. In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, Keese can be transformed by Fire Arrows or torches. They will set Link on fire, simultaneously putting themselves out. In Ocarina of Time, if Link is equipped with the Deku Shield when hit, the shield will burn (as it is made of wood).

Ice KeeseEdit

Ice Keese are Keese exposed to cold, such as an Ice Arrow or Blue Fire. In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, they freeze Link and return to normal. In Twilight Princess, Ice Keese cannot be changed into regular Keese or vice versa.

Shadow KeeseEdit

Shadow Keese are only found in the Twilight Realm in Twilight Princess. The have dragon-like bodies and strange, funnel shaped heads surrounded by a ring of grey plumage. Their faces are featureless save for red symbols. They appear to be identical to Shadow Kargorocs, except for the fact that they are smaller and weaker. As with many Shadow creatures, Shadow Keese have a distinctive cry; rather than the squeaking of the other Keese variations, Shadow Keese make a noise reminiscent of a hammer clashing on metal.

GomessEdit

Gomess is a powerful vampire that hides in the darkest room of the Stone Tower Temple, in Majora's Mask. It is surrounded by thousands of Keese and carries a huge scythe.[citation needed] It appears to be modeled after the Grim Reaper.

VireEdit

Vires are large humanoid/bat creatures, who fly and hop around the area, sometimes shooting fireballs. They split into two Keese after taking a certain amount of damage. In The Legend of Zelda, Vires are large, blue bat creatures that hop around aimlessly. They are only found in dungeons, and when harmed, split into two red-colored Keese, which float around the room like regular Keese. In Link's Awakening, Vires appear in only the Turtle Rock. They fly around and shoot fireballs. Then they will swoop down at Link. After being damaged, they will explode into two Big Keese. In Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, Vire appears as a unique enemy, a henchman to both Veran and Onox. Depending on which game is played first, Vire will begin as an underling of one or the other, with events surrounding him being altered in the second.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Lizalfos

A Lizalfos is a monster in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. They are humanoid lizards and appear as enemies to the protagonist, Link. Although their appearance and behavior change slightly from game to game, they keep fairly consistent traits throughout the series. Despite their somewhat primitive portrayal, they are intelligent enough to efficiently use armor and weaponry. They often band together into pairs or small groups.

AppearancesEdit

Lizalfos are some of the earliest enemies in the Zelda series.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

In their first appearance in The Adventure of Link, they appear as reptilian humanoids, about as tall as Link is. They all carry shields, and wear black armor over their torsos. As a whole Lizalfos are the strongest overworld enemy in the game and attack almost identically to Iron Knuckles. The weakest are orange Lizalfos, who carry one-handed spears that they attack high and low with. Red Lizalfos are the middle-class in difficulty, carrying maces that can pierce through Link's shield. Blue Lizalfos are the elite of their species, also carrying maces. Unlike the red Lizalfos, blue Lizalfos hurl their maces at Link, which are also unblockable.

Lizalfos are amongst Ganon's minions that are hunting for Link's blood in order to revive their master. Lizalfos also demonstrate some tactical mindset, as they build giant, wooden walls at choke points where Link is forced to pass. In addition to the Lizalfos, soldiers that attack Link directly, red Lizalfos stand up from behind the wooden wall and hurl rocks in groups of three.

Another reptilian species that appears in this game is called the Daira. They are axe-wielding, alligator-like humanoids with large mohawks. They wear no armor apart from a cloth tunic (orange Dairas wear red, while red Dairas wear black). Orange Dairas behave similarly to red Lizalfos, but they are faster and lack a protective shield. Red Dairas are much like blue Lizalfos, in that they have the ability to throw axes that Link cannot block without using Reflect magic.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

File:En-Lizalfos.gif
A Lizalfos from Ocarina of Time

Lizalfos appear in Ocarina of Time, but are much more sparse than in earlier incarnations. They appear in pairs, three times throughout the game — twice in the Dodongo's Cavern and once in the Spirit Temple. They frequently shriek and jump around the room. Though they always come in pairs, only one attacks Link at a time. Although, they appear more frequently in the Master Quest version of the game, appearing in places such as Lord Jabu Jabu's Belly and The Fire temple.

In addition to Lizalfos, Ocarina of Time introduces the similar Dinolfos. They appear as a dinosaur variant of the Lizalfos, with more violent-looking features, such as spines, heavier armor, and larger swords, and can withstand twice the damage than Lizalfos can. Dinolfos also appear in Majora's Mask (as "Dinofols"), and can breathe fire.

Twilight PrincessEdit

File:Lizalfostp.jpg
Lizalfos as seen in Twilight Princess

Lizalfos return in Twilight Princess as a common enemy, and appear more gekko-like and bulky than their Ocarina of Time counterparts. In this game, there are three different varieties of Lizalfos: regular, shaman, and armored. They are equipped with axes and bucklers, and many have an axehead attached to their tails. They are frequent enemies, and appear in many places across the map. The larger and more powerful Dinolfos are adept at blocking Link's attacks and will quickly recover if stunned.

Another creature very similar to Lizalfos, called Aeralfos, appears in Twilight Princess. They are winged reptilian creatures that slightly resemble dragons. They are armed with swords and shields, and their battle cries sound similar to jaguar growls. Link can target its shield using the Clawshot to drag it to the ground. If he is not quick enough, the Aeralfos will dive-attack Link, but if successful, the Clawshot will pull an Aeralfos to the ground, leaving it open for attack. If the Gale Boomerang is thrown at an Aeralfos when it is airborne, it will cause the Aeralfos to raise its shield in self-defense, making it vulnerable to the Clawshot.

DarkhammerEdit

Main page: Darkhammer

Darkhammer is a massive, armored Lizalfos-like creature that appears in Twilight Princess as a mini-boss of the fifth dungeon, Snowpeak Ruins. Darkhammer wields the ball and chain, which it spins and hurls at Link. To defeat it, Link must damage its tail while it is resting. After defeating Darkhammer, Link claims its Ball and Chain weapon.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Moblin

Moblins (モリブリン, Moriburin) are fictional pig or bulldog-like monsters in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. They often reside in forests, where the player battles them as Link, the games' main character and protagonist. Moblins commonly carry spears, but some carry swords and clubs as well. Moblins can usually be found wandering the overworld of each game in which they appear.

For the piggish brutes, food and Rupees are all that matters. As long as there is pay, nothing is too low for the selfish swines; if there is a reward, Moblins won't hesitate to act. Ganon, the games' main antagonist, has been known to frequently utilize their greedy natures by hiring Moblin mercenaries to seek out and destroy Link.[1]

There are few individual Moblins—the only Moblins that are part of their game's storyline are the Moblin King (Link's Awakening), the Great Moblin (Oracle of Ages and Seasons), Moe (The Wind Waker), and the Monster Lady (The Minish Cap).

EtymologyEdit

In Japan, where The Legend of Zelda games are developed, Moblins are known as モリブリン, written in romaji as "Moriburin". The word "Moblin" is likely a portmanteau of the words "mori" meaning "forest", and "goblin". In the English releases of The Legend of Zelda and The Adventure of Link, this name was first translated into "Molblin"[2], sparking debates over the true origins of the name of the species[citation needed]. Nintendo of America translated it to "Moblin" in A Link to the Past, and the name has been consistent in all games since. Other similar changed translations have been "Gannon" to "Ganon" and "Zola" to "Zora".

AppearancesEdit

GamesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Moblins first appeared in The Legend of Zelda as spear-throwing bulldog monsters. Their spears can be blocked by Link's Shield, and they had two key varieties, orange and blue; blue are stronger than orange, as they require more hits to kill. They are most commonly found in forest areas. A few orange Moblins hiding in secret hideouts across Hyrule give the player Rupees and deliver the famous quote, "ITS A SECRET TO EVERYBODY".[citation needed]

Notably, there is a Goron in The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess that states "It's a secret to everybody." when spoken to after the Hyrule Castle has been encased in a barrier. Though he says it in a different context, it is likely a tribute to the original Moblin.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

In The Adventure of Link, Moblins come in many new forms. The top-down view of the original Zelda made them seem short and squat, while the side-scrolling view makes them look tall and quite thin. The Moblins in this game are after Link's blood, which would have been used to resurrect Ganon, who was previously vanquished by the "original" Link. Usually, they will come at Link with defenses up, throwing Spears, while others continue regenerating and coming at Link from both sides of the screen, stealing EXP from Link whenever their spear points touch him. Link can block their spears with his shield. The different varieties of Moblins in The Adventure of Link include red Moblins, blue Moblins, and orange Moblins. Orange Moblins simply throw their Spears at Link. Red Moblins cannot throw their spear, but they can stab high or low with it. Blue Moblins can throw their spears and stab low with them.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, Moblins can only be found in the Dark World, taking the place of the variously-colored soldiers in the Light World. While the Pig Soldiers appear to be Moblins, they are never referred to as such. The ones who are Moblins are the spear-throwing ones, whose spears can be blocked by Link's shield. The ending added to the remake of this game implies that Moblins and Pig Soldiers are actually Ganon's only true soldiers, and that the other enemies are not on his side, but influenced by Agahnim's guise as the king of Hyrule. In its Satellaview direct sequel, BS The Legend of Zelda: The Ancient Stone Tablets, there are no Moblins, on account of the fact that the Dark World is not present.

Link's AwakeningEdit

Link's Awakening marks the first time a Moblin ever used a sword. Moblins only appear in the Mysterious Forest and the Moblin Hideout, as Sword Moblins (always with shields as well). The Moblins with swords do not wander around aimlessly throwing spears like most of their race, but instead home in on intruders (Link in this case) like the guards in A Link to the Past. Some Moblins in this game, however, do maintain the tactic of wandering and firing arrows. The Moblin King, who kidnapped Madam Meow-Meow's Bow-Wow (a Chain Chomp from the Mario games) resides in the Moblin Hideout, and serves as a boss in this game. Since Link's Awakening has nothing to do with Ganon directly, it is unknown whether these Moblins are under his control (but not likely, as Koholint Island is a foreign land, as well as merely a dream of the Wind Fish).

Link's Awakening seems to also mark the transition in appearance of Moblins. In older games they resemble bulldogs, but in later installments of the series, they resemble pigs instead. Interestingly, in addition to bulldog-like Moblins, there are enemies that move and attack exactly like them (both with swords and shields, and bows) that are pig-like (called Butablin in the Japanese version, buta meaning pig). These enemies are found mostly in the area of Tal Tal Heights, near the Wind Fish's Egg.


Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Moblins only appear in the Sacred Forest Meadow when Link is an adult. All but one of them will charge at Link with a spear when they spot him; the last one guards the corridor leading to the entrance of the Forest Temple, and when Link approaches it, it will hit the ground releasing shock-waves from its club that will harm Link if they make contact. Both the regular Moblins and the guardian are much larger than any previous Moblins. Although these Moblins are also pig-like in form, they have a somewhat bulldog-like face and a bull-like scream when they charge. Those found in the maze area can be defeated using a large variety of weapons, although the large Moblin wielding a club is best countered with arrows because of its range, or with the Hookshot, Longshot, or sword from behind. Unlike other enemies in this game, Navi is unable to lock on to or provide information about the Moblins here.

In the Master Quest version of Ocarina of Time, a Club Moblin that causes shock-waves like the one guarding the Forest Temple entrance can be found in the Spirit Temple.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Moblins are one of the most common enemies. They act exactly as they did in Link's Awakening. They come in red and blue varieties, and Oracle of Seasons features a one-of-a-kind gold Moblin; the blue ones are usually more difficult to find and to defeat.

The Great MoblinEdit

The Great Moblin terrorizes the populace in Holodrum and Labrynna — however he is never in two places at once; he is always in the land of the game played first, and then when Link drives him out of that land he goes into the other land, where the player can further humiliate him if they follow him by playing a linked game using a password from the first. He will also recognize Link in that second land, whereas in the non-linked game he has never seen him before.[citation needed]

In Labrynna he builds his Moblin Keep (with warning signs all around it) and rules over the mountain and its inhabitants, preventing the Gorons from growing their famous Bomb Flowers — he makes the more traditional sort of bombs (by hand), so it is to be assumed that he wants to drive them out of business.

In Holodrum he builds another Moblin Keep, but this one is very different and has cannons all around the walls. He stands on the wall, waiting to take out anyone who comes near. However, his cannons fire bombs rather than cannonballs, so he is more an annoyance to Link rather than a real threat.

The Great Moblin and his henchmen are greedy, and always out to make a profit. In Holodrum (depending on the story strand) the player will find his minions surrounding Dimitri. They intend to sell him ("Bwee! I found somethin' weird! If we catch it and sell it, we'll be rich!!! And the Great Moblin will be very pleased!!!"). If Link wants to rescue Dimitri from this fate he has to pay them a total of 80 Rupees in exchange for him.[citation needed]

If the player is in Holodrum while playing a linked game, the Great Moblin kidnaps Princess Zelda, once again hoping to make a profit ("Such fine clothes... You must be a high-class girl! Rupees, jewels, everything! Give me your valuables!"). After a brief skirmish, though, he retreats back to the Moblin Keep.

After Link destroys the Holodrum Moblin Keep, he will not leave the land (like he does when his Keep in Labrynna is destroyed) but will instead move into an abandoned house in the south-eastern corner of Sunken City. There he and his minions make bombs, apparently to sell to get the funds to rebuild the Keep. If Link drops a bomb or an Ember Seed on this pile and then runs out the door, the house explodes, and the Great Moblin and his henchmen narrowly escape the smoldering ruins. They soon return again to rebuild the house (which is a much shabbier version of the building) and continue making bombs once more. Link can blow up this second house too, and they will flee yet again. The next time they rebuild, however, the moment Link ignites their pile of bombs the Great Moblin says, "Bwee-hee! So it was you! You'll pay!!! An eye for an eye!". They throw Link into the house and run away, and it explodes with Link still inside, killing him (and giving the player the save/continue menu as with any death).

Moblin RingEdit

In both Ages and Seasons, Link can acquire a magical Ring that transforms him into a Moblin. He cannot use any attacks in this form, but he is ignored by any Moblins (with the exception of the Great Moblin), and also cannot be eaten by Like Likes. The ring can only be found in Maple's possession, or inside of a Gasha Nut.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Wind Waker, Moblins are large, gray-brown or blue pig monsters who carry glaives. They do not appear as often here as in previous Zelda installments, on account of them being much more powerful than most types of Moblins. If they catch Link inside the Forsaken Fortress while he is unable to defend himself, they will set him alight with their lanterns and throw him back into his cell. They can use their glaives to thrust at Link, which they usually do 2-3 times before unleashing a very wide swipe. They are one of the first enemies that are introduced in this game. Link can disarm a Moblin and use the glaives they wield as a weapon, albeit a rather cumbersome one. Link can also use the Grappling Hook to steal a Moblin's Skull Necklace—a valuable treasure that can be given to a certain character in the game to earn rewards.

The Wind Waker Moblins are fairly comical. When their Skull Necklaces are stolen, they cry out in surprise with a shocked expression on their face. Also, when they are cut from behind (stabbing attacks are most effective for this), they start hopping around in pain, holding their rear end. Sometimes, they also panic and run away from bombs thrown at them, and will not start fighting until the bombs explode. If a Moblin is lured to run over a high ledge, it will hang suspended in the air Looney Tunes style until it looks down and flails wildly before falling to its death.

The Wind Waker saw the introduction of the first Moblin with a specific name: "Moe". Apparently, he worked at the Forsaken Fortress and developed a relationship with Maggie, the daughter of the rags-to-riches villager on Windfall Island (Moe is supposedly the source of the man's new-found wealth, as Maggie's father sold the Skull Necklaces that Moe gave to Maggie for a high price). The father forbids the relationship, but Link can help her by delivering a letter to Moe. As it turns out, Moe has mail for Maggie as well (which Maggie interprets to be romantic, when in fact Moe writes that he likes her so much that he would like to eat her for dinner). For helping Maggie and Moe, Link receives a Piece of Heart. Although Moe is crucial to this side quest, the player never sees him. But, this shows that Moblins can read and write, probably in the same language as post-Great Flood Hyruleans, and that perhaps Moblins are capable of love.

Furthermore, the first form of the final sub-boss of Ganon's Castle, Puppet Ganon, seems to be based on the Moblin, though it may be based on Ganondorf's pig-like form, which the Moblin may in turn be based on.

BokoblinsEdit

Relatives of Moblins are the smarter, but less powerful Bokoblins, little pig-imp creatures with a speared tail, who are often found in dungeons and all over the Great Sea, often on rafts and lookout towers and in submarines. They come in blue, green and pink colors, and often carry telescopes, machetes, or Boko Sticks. Some also wield small wooden shields that bear the post office marker of the Forsaken Fortress. Their attack style is straight-on, weaving left and right until an opportune moment to strike, and they often perform jump attacks. They are also capable of operating machinery, such as the giant search lights at the Forsaken Fortress. Skills such as the ability to operate machinery and use various tools may render the Bokoblin much more intelligent than their relatives, the Moblins. They also carry Joy Pendants as spoils which is the first item that is stolen when a Grappling Hook is used on one or when they are killed. The Joy Pendants can be surrendered to the schoolteacher on Windfall Island, which will yield Link great rewards.

MiniblinsEdit

Even smaller than Bokoblins, Miniblins are a type of pygmy side species. They repeatedly spawn and attack in masses until the player leaves the area. They appear mostly in caves, but also appear in certain sections of the Great Sea. They also appear to be less intelligent than Moblins, in that they can be easily distracted if Link throws some bait in their direction, to the point where they fight each other for it. Miniblins also appear in Phantom Hourglass.

The Minish CapEdit

Moblins in The Minish Cap are virtually identical in appearance and actions to their The Wind Waker counterparts, except they never carry torches. They are equipped with either bows or spears. The bowmen will shoot Link on sight, while the spearmen charge at him in a straight line (they have no slashing attack). They come in "flesh" and gray varieties, and often drop large amounts of Rupees when slain.

The first Moblins appear when Link leaves the Sanctuary. Link is confronted by Vaati, who then locks him in a pen with two Moblins.

Interestingly, there is a woman who appears in another person's house at some point in the game, the lights are turned off, but if Link lights the torches, she will turn into a Moblin, but will not attack him. This is likely a reference to the first Zelda game, in which non-violent Moblins can be found.

It should also be noted that one book in the library is titled: Married to the Moblin. While this could be a reference to Maggie and Moe's relationship in The Wind Waker, it is more likely a play on the title of the 1988 film "Married to the Mob".

Twilight PrincessEdit

File:09A King Bulblin.jpg
King Bulblin astride Lord Bullbo

Although Moblins appeared in the 2004 trailer of Twilight Princess, they do not show up in the final release. Instead, Bokoblins return from The Wind Waker, along with a new Moblin relative called Bulblins, which are humanoid orc-like creatures with bull-like horns. [1] Bulblins are armed with maces or bows, and can ride in pairs on boars known as "Bullbos". The Bulblins are led by King Bulblin.

Bokoblins in Twilight Princess can be found in various areas. Their endurance and difficulty is dependent on their colors; blue or red (wielding wooden and steel swords respectively), the latter being the more powerful enemy. Unlike their The Wind Waker versions, these Bokoblins have whitish hair, and look much more human having lost their pig-snouts and tails.

Other mediaEdit

Moblins in the cartoon seriesEdit

The Moblins in the DiC cartoon series had red eyes (like those in the original Zelda game) and a bulldog-like appearance. Their trademark stupidity led them to constantly foul up their master Ganon's plans. However they could still think for themselves, and at one point decided Ganon was so hopeless (Link always thwarted his schemes) that they were better off without him; they overthrew him and formed "The Brotherhood of Underworld Monsters" with the other liberated monsters that were previously under Ganon's rule (such as the Stalfos, Mobys and Wolfos), but in the end they weren't much more effective without their leader.

Moblins in the comicsEdit

File:Moblin comic.jpg
A Moblin, as seen in the comic adaptation of The Legend of Zelda.

As in the animated series, the comic book Moblins are not intelligent, but they do have individual personalities and are able to speak.[citation needed] Moblins in The Wind Waker are known to speak and understand Hylian.

ReferencesEdit

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Octorok

Octoroks are round, cephalopod-like land creatures that appear in most of The Legend of Zelda games. They are one of the series' most common and recognizable enemies.

In many of the Zelda games, Octoroks have appeared across the overworld and other areas as land-dwelling animals, but in Ocarina of Time, they also started appearing as aquatic enemies who attack similarly to Zoras from previous games. However, in prototype versions of Ocarina of Time, they were the same design as A Link to the Past. They appear as octopus-like enemies that can shoot rocks from their mouth, hence the name.

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

File:Zola.png
Octoroks from The Legend of Zelda.

The Octoroks are creatures that come in shades of red and blue, and shoot rocks at Link. They are commonly found in the areas near the game's starting point.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

Their appearance remained the same for the most part, but only some actually move around. Some jump in place, firing as it jumps. As in the first game, there are Blue and Red variants.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, there is only one shade (red) for the Octoroks. They are much faster than previous Octoroks, and some possess the ability to shoot rocks in four directions quickly. Octoroks only appear in the Light World, though a similar creature (slightly resembling the Ocarina of Time style of Octorok) appears in the Dark World. Signs made to look similar are in a Shooting Gallery. In the Palace of the Four Swords (a bonus dungeon only found in the GBA re-release), there is a dark room with three Golden Octoroks inside.

Link's AwakeningEdit

In this game, they remained the same as in A Link to the Past's. Like those in A Link to the Past, they lack a color difference, and only come in one form. There is also a new type of Octorok called the Flying Octorok. It has large buglike wings, and flies over Link when attacked, much the same way a Stalfos jumps out of harm's way. The best way to defeat one is to run into it with the Sword and Pegasus Boots equipped. As with Stalfos, they won't detect a charged spin attack, giving the player another possibility for defeating them.

Zelda: The Wand of GamelonEdit

Although Octoroks do not make an appearance in this non-canon Zelda game Link does briefly reference the creatures in the opening FMV by commenting "I'm so hungry, I could eat an Octorok!" to the King. However, there is an enemy similar to an Octorok found before talking to Impa at Tykogi Tower, right down to its octopus-like appearance and tendency to spit rocks.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

File:BetaOcto.jpg
Beta Octoroks from a very early version of Ocarina of Time. Notice the similarity with the Octoroks from A Link to the Past.

In Ocarina of Time, Octoroks made a drastic change to sea-dwelling creatures. They now sit in place, and wait for a while before firing directly at Link. The only way to defeat them is with a projectile weapon or by deflecting their shots back at them.

BigoctoEdit

Bigocto is a sub-boss in Ocarina of Time who traps Princess Ruto, and fights with Link by chasing him around a large platform in circles. It looks very different from the other Octoroks of that game, but bears a similar face. Although it has a mouth similar to the other Octoroks, it appears to lack the ability to shoot rocks.

Majora's MaskEdit

In this game, they kept Octoroks as sea-dwellers. Like many elements of Majora's Mask, Octoroks and Big Octos were reused from Ocarina of Time. Octoroks are often required to get to various places by freezing them and using them as platforms. There are also two Big Octos guarding caves in a Swamp, and the only way to get rid of them are certain items (such as the Bow & Arrows) and having Koume's boat crash into it as it passes them.

Octoroks are used as targets in the Town Shooting Gallery, with red ones being the desired target and blue ones being the ones to avoid. If the player manages to shoot forty of the fifty targets, they win a quiver upgrade. If all fifty are shot, a piece of heart is won. It should be noted that the blue Octoroks are exclusive to the Town Shooting Gallery and are not found elsewhere in the game. Additionally, you can get the third prize of 20 rupees at the Camera Shop by taking a photo of one of the Big Octos.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

Octoroks come in shades of Blue and Red, akin to the original Legend of Zelda's style, and the fact that Blues are more powerful than Reds. Blue enemies appear in the past and during Summer and Winter, while Red appear in Present time and appear during Spring and Autumn. They look exactly the same as Link's Awakening's Octoroks. In Oracle of Seasons there is a Gold Octorok who appears in the Spool Swamp during the Summer. In Oracle of Ages Link must help a Great Fairy that is cursed to live in the form of an Octorok.

Octorok RingEdit

In both games, the player can acquire a magical Ring that transforms Link into an Octorok. He cannot use any attacks in this form, but he is ignored by other Octoroks, and also cannot be eaten by Like Likes.

Super Smash Bros. MeleeEdit

File:Gal zl-t18.jpg
Octorok Trophy

Octoroks appear as random enemies, usually found in Boxes and Barrels, in their sea-dwelling form. They fire Rocks at the player, but the Rocks can be deflected back at them. Also found in Adventure Mode, in the Legend of Zelda Adventure Stage. There is also an Octorok trophy available by random lottery.

The Wind WakerEdit

File:Octorok Big Octorok The Wind Waker.jpg
A Sea Octo from The Wind Waker

Octoroks return as sea-dwelling creatures in The Wind Waker. Some Octoroks (blue) lurk around in shallow waters on islands and fire at people, hiding whenever someone comes near, while others (red) dwell in the ocean, firing Bombs from their mouth at random travelers. A rare type of Octorok known as the Big Octo (which look different from the ones in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, insofar as they resemble squid) appears in certain areas, where Seagulls are circling. They await passing boats and create a whirlpool to suck up the boat and Link, launching them far away. The number of eyes they have varies from four, to eight, and even twelve, with more eyes representing stronger Octoroks (since ALL the eyes must be destroyed to defeat the monster). Once slain, the Big Octo leaves an underwater treasure chest which, when fished up, will reveal either a piece of heart or an orange Rupee (there is one exception: One Big Octo has eaten a Great Fairy, and killing it will free the Fairy, who will double your magic meter). The figurine of the Octorok gives it the "perfect attendance award" for being in all of The Legend of Zelda games.

The Octorok sprite from The Legend of Zelda appears on the Figurine Fanatic (Manny)'s pack.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

Their appearance most resembles that of The Minish Cap, and they fight in almost the exact same way, except they can shoot in four directions. There are three varieties: Red, Blue, and Pink, but they are all more or less of equal power. Red and Blue tend to attack individually, with Blue taking multiple hits (each hit causing a slight expansion in size) before they are destroyed. Blues must be repeatedly attacked at a constant rate or they will shrink in size, thus the process of destroying them will have begin again. Pinks tend to attack in swarms and have the ability to rapidly spit rocks in near continuous streams.

The Minish CapEdit

They once again return as land-dwelling red and blue Octoroks, with blue being stronger than red. They fire rocks at Link, and through Kinstone fusing, rare Golden Octoroks sometimes appear. These Octoroks are much faster and stronger than regular Octoroks. They also fire rocks, but when they do, they fire three rocks in rapid succession, rather than just one. However they leave behind great wealth if defeated.

Big OctorokEdit

File:Big Octorok.png
The Big Octorok

Big Octorok (the fourth major boss of the game) is an Octorok who was frozen solid inside the Temple of Droplets. Like with the Giant ChuChus the name is a bit of a misnomer. The Big Octorok is actually a standard sized Octorok, but Link is minish size during the fight. When the player let sun shine into the temple to thaw out the frozen Water Element, the Big Octorok also thawed, and ate the Element (its figurine states that it was frozen for so long it was starving). Along with the normal rock-spitting ability of Octoroks (which is extra powerful due to Link's size), the Big Octorok can transform into a frozen form, and can put out the light by spitting dark clouds of ink.

Phantom HourglassEdit

Octoroks return as relatively unimpressive enemies in Phantom Hourglass. They are red with a blue ring around their mouths. The rocks they spit are no longer able to be deflected, however.

TriviaEdit

  • In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, Lord Crump uses a battleship with a huge cannon distinctively shaped like an Octorok.
  • In Mario and Luigi: Superstar Saga, one of the non-optional minigames featured Chuckoroks.
  • The Pokémon Octillery closely resembles the Octorok, complete with the cannon snout.
  • The only canon Zelda game where the Octorok has not made an appearance in is Twilight Princess. The reason is unknown. However, the Toadpoli enemy which made appearances in Goron Mines and the Lakebed Temple share similar characteristics with the Ocarina of Time Octorok.
  • In Super Mario Galaxy, there is an enemy that physically resembles Octoroks, as well as in its ability to spit out rocks. When defeated, it triggers a slight pause in gameplay, similar to when enemies are defeated in 3D Zelda games.
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Peahat

A Peahat is an enemy in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. They are plant-like in appearance and always have their signature propeller-type leaves or petals, allowing them to fly around the overworld (Hyrule Field) and attack from great heights.

The Peahats are a race of helicopter/plant-like enemies. They are pineapple-like in appearance and the "helicopter blades" are probably some sort of hardened leaves which the Peahat developed as a protection to deflect weapons as well as a mechanism for flight. They are only active in the daytime, but can produce larvae at night if disturbed. They can be killed in some games only when resting on the ground, and in other games, the roots must be struck underneath the blades.

AppearancesEdit

Peahats have appeared in half of the Zelda games to date in one form or another.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

The Peahats in this game appear to look similar to small, orange flower-like enemies with white helicopter leaves, found mostly in the northern half of the overworld. They are out of reach while they are moving (as it is assumed that they are flying too high for Link to hit), but can be attacked when they stop (although it is usually better and easier just to avoid them altogether).

Link's AwakeningEdit

Peahats in Link's Awakening are nearly identical in appearance and behavior to their Legend of Zelda counterparts.

File:Zelda 1 Peahat.gif
A Peahat in Ocarina of Time

Ocarina of TimeEdit

The Peahats in this game are much larger than their counterparts from earlier games. When Link is a child, they litter Hyrule Field, and attack whenever a traveler comes near. When Link becomes an adult, they no longer exist. Their appearance has also changed from earlier games, having large blade-like propellers as opposed to the flower propellers they had had. There are two varieties, one that flies low and chases Link, attempting to cut him up with its spinning blades, and one that flies very high and remains stationary, attacking instead by sending out Peahat Larvae that Link must either flee from or deflect with his shield (or duck as necessary to avoid them). The former could be defeated by getting underneath it and cutting at its vulnerable roots, while the latter must be shot down with a projectile weapon or else avoided (it releases Peahat Larvae, which will slowly descend until they hit the ground—they die once they reach the ground). The larvae of the second variety are endless, and the Peahat will continue producing them until night when it sleeps. A Peahat attacked while sleeping will spew Peahat Larvae.

Majora's MaskEdit

There is only one Peahat to be found in the entire game, guarding a Piece of Heart in a small, underground cave hidden in Termina Field. This Peahat is identical to the low-flying variety of Peahat in Ocarina of Time.

The Wind WakerEdit

Peahats are small and fly into Link to attack him with their blades. These can only be killed with projectiles, since the spinning blades act as a shield against a sword. Another way for the player to temporarily disable their shield is to knock them to the ground with the Deku Leaf or Boomerang and then destroy them with the sword. When struck, they make a high-pitched cry, mildly reminiscent of the English voice of the Pokémon Jigglypuff.

SeahatEdit

Seahats are in the same genus as Peahats. So far, they have been found only in the The Wind Waker, where they only live in the Great Sea. Seahats, a relatively large flying shark-like fish creature who rushes at Link. The sound it produces when moving through the water is similar to that of a motorboat. It can be killed with projectile weapons, and if struck by the Boomerang, the leaves on its head will be destroyed, rendering the Seahat immobile.

The Minish CapEdit

In this game, Peahats appear more like Octoroks with flowers on their head. They are invincible while flying, and never come to rest. Instead, Link can defeat them with the Gust Jar, either by stunning them with a puff of wind, or by sucking them into the jar and then launching them out.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Peahats appear in the located in the Gerudo Desert and City in the Sky dungeon, serving as Clawshot targets. Their appearance has once again changed: only the rotating "leaves" appear plant-like, the bulk of the Peahat's body is the large root that Link can hang from. Unlike previous installments, they do not attack, and are actually useful as aerial transportation in several areas throughout the two regions listed above, and also are needed for use in the boss battle of the City in the Sky.

Also, there are two trees that appear to have Peahats growing off of them in the desert.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Poe

A Poe is a ghost enemy in The Legend of Zelda series of video games, one of concentrated hatred toward the world that freely roams graveyards and other haunted locales in Hyrule, as well as the overworld and dark places. They always carry their signature lanterns.

Ocarina of Time and Majora's MaskEdit

In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, they fly around until they spot Link, at which time they will charge at him, spinning their lanterns. Targeting Poes in these games will cause them to become temporarily invisible, although they will become visible every once in a while. Their lanterns remain visible when they vanish, allowing Link to at least dodge, block, and keep track of the invulnerable enemy until it reappears. Attacking a Poe while targeting it will cause them to run away, often going through walls in the process. When a Poe is defeated in these games, its physical body turns to ash, and the lantern it was holding drops and breaks, revealing its spirit. The Poe Spirit appears as either a purple flame with a sad face, or a green flame with a happy face, and disappears after a while. Before it disappears, Link can put the Spirit in a bottle, which is primarily used to sell for Rupees but can also be consumed, which can have strange (and usually negative, though not always) effects. As an adult, Link will encounter Big Poes, which can also be sold for monetary rewards or earn him a bottle from the collector. Poes are less common in Majora's Mask, but are worth more when sold.

Sharp and FlatEdit

In Ocarina of Time, the ghosts of the royal composer brothers named Sharp and Flat tell Link about the Sun's Song and other music-related things after he defeats them in Kakariko Graveyard (Flat and Sharp fight like regular Poes). They explain their origins as composers of the Royal Family who were each researching a song, one that controls the sun, and one that controls the moon. They combined and composed their findings to create the "Sun's Song" as a way of controlling both. Once Link learns the song, he can use it to turn day into night and night into day. The brothers were going to reveal their findings to the king when they learned of Ganondorf's treachery. Unfortunately, the two took that secret and their song to their graves...literally. They are among the few characters in the game that still recognize Link after his seven-year hiatus in the Sacred Realm. In Majora's Mask, the Composer Brothers have a more direct role in the plot. Sharp had "sold his soul to the devil" and had imprisoned Flat in Ikana's Graveyard. When Link frees Flat, he tells Link about his brother's curse and reveals to him the Song of Storms, which has the power to lift curses and is used to defeat Sharp later on. Sharp had been haunting the spring that is the head of the river in Ikana Canyon. The Music Box House used the spring to keep the undead-repelling song playing, but the river has stopped flowing. Sharp attempts to kill Link with an unholy song (which is actually the Song of Healing played backwards), but when Link plays the Song of Storms, Sharp is purified and the river flows once more. Sharp then realizes the error of his ways and reveals that he knows how to get into the Stone Tower Temple, but he is only willing to convey this information to Link if Link will first fulfill his final request: Link must go see the king in the ruins to lay his soul to rest.

The Poe SistersEdit

There are four Poes known as the Poe Sisters: Joelle, Beth, Amy, and Meg. In Ocarina of Time, these Poes are the sub-bosses of the Forest Temple. As Link enters the temple proper, they steal the four torch flames necessary to activate the elevator which is used to enter the sub-basement where the boss's lair is located and use them to light their signature lanterns; as Link makes his way through the temple, he battles each of them one-on-one in order to relight the torches. They are also fought in a mini-game in The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask.

In the Explorer's Crypt of Oracle of Seasons, Link must defeat two unnamed Poe Sisters individually to progress, and then the other two as the mini-boss. One carries a lantern, leaving a trail of fire as it flies around, while the other carries a sword that it charges at Link with. Each of them first appears in a room that gradually darkens, eventually hurtling Link back to the dungeon entrance if he is too slow to flee the room. Link then encounters each of them in a room adjacent to the darkening room they had cursed, where he fights one of them. After these encounters, the sisters will fight Link together, forcing him to not only attack them, but also relight the lamps they extinguish, lest he be expelled back to the dungeon entrance as before.

The Poe Sisters in Ocarina of Time are named for the four main characters of Louisa May Alcott's Little Women.

Big PoeEdit

Big Poes in Ocarina of Time are similar in appearance to regular Poes, although they wear orange robes instead of purple. There are ten Big Poes that adult Link can find in certain locations throughout Hyrule Field. While on foot, the Big Poes circle Link, keeping a safe distance from him, and shoot fire out of their lanterns. They do not turn invisible, but if Link fails to defeat them they eventually disappear completely, refusing to reappear until Link leaves and returns to the field. When defeated on foot, the Poe spirit is treated like that of an ordinary Poe. If Link encounters them on horseback, they behave differently. Rather than attack, they quickly fly away and disappear when they hit a wall. Link has to attack quickly using his horseback archery skills in order to defeat it. A Big Poe defeated on horseback is treated as a true Big Poe when bottled, and as a side quest, Link can catch and sell each Big Poe to the Ghost Shop at the gates of the fallen Hyrule Castle for Rupees. Once Link has turned in all ten Big Poes, he is rewarded with a Bottle.

The Big Poes that appear in Majora's Mask look nearly identical to regular Poes (including wearing purple clothing), but they are noticeably larger. A Big Poe appears as a sub-boss in the Beneath the Well dungeon and in the third night's open grave in Ikana Graveyard. It is summoned when three blue flames appear and merge together. Defeating this Big Poe earns Link a bottle. This Big Poe attacks much like a normal Poe, but after each attack it teleports to charge Link from another direction, usually from behind. It will also hover higher than most regular Poes, almost requiring arrows to defeat it. The bottled Big Poe can be sold for 200 Rupees at the Curiosity Shop; however, one is also needed to trade with one of the Gibdos beneath the well.

The Wind WakerEdit

File:Poeww.jpg
Poes as they appear in The Wind Waker.

In The Wind Waker, Poes harass Link by attempting to burn him with their lamps, and can jump into his body to possess him, reversing the player's movement controls. These Poes are invulnerable unless exposed to light, which causes their ethereal bodies to become temporarily solid (evidently causing them great distress, as the sudden change to their environment causes them to run around frantically). Poes are also shown to be ruled by Jalhalla in this game.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In Twilight Princess, a character named Jovani sold his own soul to the Poes. The Poes require the pieces of his soul to live, and can only be defeated by ripping out their souls. Because of this, there are a finite number of Poes in the game, and once one is defeated, it is gone for good (similar to the Golden Skulltulas of Ocarina of Time). Technically, you can beat the game having collected only five Poes, though it is very useful to collect every Poe Soul. After returning twenty Poes to Jovani, he rewards Link with a bottle full of fairy tears. After collecting all sixty Poes, his cat, Gengle, grants you unlimited silver Rupees (200 every time you speak with him).

Imp PoesEdit

In Twilight Princess, the majority of the Poes that Jovani sold his soul to were Poe Imps. Poe Imps are smaller versions of Poes, and can only be seen as floating blue lanterns while Link is human. To see their bodies, Link must transform into his wolf form and use his sense ability. When seen in this wolf form, Poes are bright bluish-white, with faces similar to those of the Skull Kid of the same game, and carry their lanterns with their feet, wielding large scythes for attack. Poes like the dark, so they are found only at night or in dark places like caves and dungeons. There are sixty Poe Souls scattered throughout Hyrule to collect, many of them difficult to find.

PoesEdit

In an event similar to that in the Forest Temple in Ocarina of Time, four Poes (the only regular Poes in the game) steal the flames that open a door in the Arbiter's Grounds dungeon. These Poes are larger than Imp Poes, and wear cloaks. After being killed, the cloak remains on the floor (despite being ghosts, they have a scent that Wolf Link can track). One of the Poes that Link fights has the ability to make three clones of himself — an ability no other Poe has (except the Poe sister Meg from Ocarina of Time, another parallel to the Poe sisters). The clones circle Link, and one of them will eventually start to shine more brightly than the others, giving itself away.

JalhallaEdit

Jalhalla is the king of Poes (and apparently Ghinis as well), and so is very large, similar to most of the series' rulers. Jalhalla resembles a gigantic version of the Poes from The Wind Waker, but has a differently shaped mask and a horribly bloated stomach. The name Jalhalla is likely based on Valhalla, the Norse heaven for heroes and home of Odin. Jalhalla himself was possibly based on Boolossus from Luigi's Mansion, as both are massive ghosts that result when several ghosts merged together. The battle music when fighting Jalhalla is reminiscent of a French accordion.

Jalhalla appears in The Wind Waker as the boss of the Earth Temple and a sub-boss in Ganon's Tower, and twice in Four Swords Adventures as a boss. The first boss is Jalhalla's haunted mask and the second boss is a Big Poe containing the escaped spirit from the destroyed mask.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/ReDead

Artwork of a ReDead from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

ReDeads are zombie-like undead beings that proliferate Hyrule in the Legend of Zelda series. They were introduced in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. ReDeads were notable for being one of the more horrific elements featured in games such as Legend of Zelda, adding an unexpectedly dark element to the game.

AttackingEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and The Wind Waker, ReDeads will let out a paralyzing shriek at any enemies that they face toward. If a ReDead hears prey near to itself, it will jump at it, wrapping its limbs around it, and drain its life force through its mouth. If the player is caught in their deathly embrace, they can only escape by wildly moving the control stick around to throw the ReDead off.

ReDeads can be defeated by most weapons, though they usually display an extreme weakness to light. To be specific, they will be paralyzed if caught in a shaft of light, either by reflecting light at them or summoning it with the "Sun's Song", while shooting a magical Light Arrow at them will destroy them in one hit. In all incarnations, they will crumple and fall to the ground when defeated, taking time to dissipate, unlike most enemies which immediately evaporate in a puff of smoke.

AppearanceEdit

In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, ReDeads appeared as depicted in the above image. They also could only sense the player through sound, so if the player moved quietly, he could maneuver around the ReDead without calling attention to himself. A similar enemy known as the Gibdo appeared, which differed from ReDead only in appearance, having the visage of an Egyptian mummy. Both enemies made low moaning sounds if the player entered a room they were in, even if they weren't attacking.

File:WindWaker ReDead.jpg
A ReDead in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

In The Wind Waker, ReDeads were more skeletal than their previous incarnations, and appeared as depicted to the right. Their scream was somewhat higher, and they could operate on sight. In general, however, they behaved much as their counterparts in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask.

ReDead Knights appear in Twilight Princess, and are very similar to the earlier ReDeads. Unlike ReDeads, though, they are fleshier, are partially wrapped in bandages, much larger, and carry a large broadsword. They also attack differently - like ReDeads, they will shriek to paralyze an opponent, but instead of the usual deadly embrace, they will slowly swing their huge sword at Link for a fair amount of damage. They can also cross quicksand easily in order to attack the player. Like ReDeads, they can be damaged with most weapons, though as light was not manipulatable in Twilight Princess, it is unknown if they share that traditional weakness.

GibdosEdit

File:Gibdo.jpg
A Gibdo from The Legend of Zelda

Gibdos, undead creatures bearing the appearance of Egyptian mummies, also serve as enemies in the series.

Gibdos behave the same as ReDeads in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. In A Link to the Past and The Minish Cap, Gibdos will attempt to grab Link but will not shriek at him, while in The Legend of Zelda, Link's Awakening, Oracle of Ages, and Oracle of Seasons, they can only attack by running into him. Gibdos are also known for taking many hits to kill, as well as not being thrown back by Link's attacks, like most enemies are.

In all of its appearances besides The Legend of Zelda and Ocarina of Time, the Gibdos bandages can be burned away with some kind of fiery attack, revealing a different enemy underneath. In Majora's Mask, this enemy is the ReDead, while in all other incarnations, it is the Stalfos. In Majora's Mask, it is revealed that the Gibdos are sentient, as the player must don disguise and trade with them to pass through a small dungeon they are guarding.

MasksEdit

In Ocarina of Time, the Spooky Mask resembles the wooden mask of the ReDead. According to the scientist at the Lakeside Laboratory, it was made of wood from a coffin.

In Majora's Mask the Gibdo Mask resembles the face of a Gibdo, and is obtained by healing a scientist that is becoming a Gibdo due to being bitten by one. Majora's Mask also includes the Captain's Hat and the Garo's Mask, modeled after other undead enemies. Wearing any of these three masks will render ReDeads and Gibdos harmless, even if they are attacked. These masks also allow Link to talk to Gibdos, and coax ReDeads to dance. A Gossip Stone in the Ikana Canyon reveals that the ReDeads dance because they were once members of the King of Ikana's dancing troupe.

CameosEdit

In the game Super Smash Bros. Melee, ReDeads from Ocarina of Time or Majora's Mask are found as one of the minor enemies in crates or in Adventure Mode. They are slightly faster and do not make a shrieking sound, instead rushing towards and biting any player character they see.

TriviaEdit

A comic strip from the popular webcomic VGCats once humorously commented on the the method that ReDeads use to damage the player.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Stalfos

Stalfos are enemies from The Legend of Zelda series of video games. They have appeared in every The Legend of Zelda game to date, and always take the form of undead skeletons. Depending on the game, they are sometimes referred to as "Stalfos Knights". Stalfos are dead warriors who still have a strong will to fight, and serve evil powers such as Ganon or Vaati.[1]

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Stalfos first appear in The Legend of Zelda as dungeon-dwelling enemies. They usually attack Link by trying to touch him. They were depicted as holding a pair of swords, but they did not seem to have any use. However in the Second Quest, they can shoot sword beams.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

Stalfos are found in the various palaces of the side-scrolling The Adventure of Link. Still a skeleton carrying a sword and shield, Stalfos gained a more proportionate appearance that fit the game's new perspective. There are four variations of Stalfos in this game. The first is red and carries a sword and shield. It swings its sword at the top level, but never defends its legs. Blue Stalfos uses the downward sword slice, but is otherwise exactly the same as the red ones. Both Stalfos variants may wear helmets once in a while, which protects them from Link's downward sword slices.

A Link to the PastEdit

Stalfos return in A Link to the Past, again in red and blue colors. Blue Stalfos jump around to avoid Link whenever he swings his sword towards one, while the red ones throw bones at him from afar. Special yellow Stalfos also appear at times; these ones can detach their skulls from their bodies. Once detached, the floating skulls spin around and rush at Link.

Stalfos WarriorEdit

A larger form of Stalfos known as the Stalfos Warrior appear in the Ice Palace dungeon. These skeletons are much larger and tougher than Stalfos, and carried large swords. Link had to attack them repeatedly, and then, when they had crumbled to bones, destroy their skull with a bomb before the warrior could regenerate.

Link's AwakeningEdit

In Link's Awakening Stalfos are practically unchanged from their A Link to the Past counterparts, with the exception of a hooded Stalfos that wields a sword. This Stalfos appear in certain locations, and attacks Link in a manner similar to a Moblin.

Master StalfosEdit

The Master Stalfos is a large Stalfos that appeared as a mini-boss in the "Catfish's Maw" dungeon that must be defeated to get the hookshot. It is reminiscent of the Stalfos Warrior of A Link to the Past, but also carries a shield.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

File:Oot-stalfos.gif
Stalfos from Ocarina of Time

In Ocarina of Time, the Stalfos are said to be people who have gotten lost in the maze-like Lost Woods[2]. They mainly appear in mini-boss form. These Stalfos carry swords and shields and can parry many of Link's attacks. They often fight in pairs, and occasionally, Link has to kill the other Stalfos quickly before the first one regenerates. A total of 16 Stalfos appear in the game: five in the Forest Temple, four in the Shadow Temple, two in the Gerudo Training Ground, one in the Spirit Temple, and four in Ganon's Castle.

StalchildEdit

File:Stalchild.gif
A Stalchild.

There is also a smaller form of Stalfos called Stalchildren that appear in large groups at night in Hyrule Field. These Stalchildren were unarmed and attacked only with their claws. If decapitated they would continue to fight without trouble. They would harass Link until the sun rose, then they would disappear. If Link keeps killing Stalchildren, after a while even bigger versions will attack, and will leave behind bigger Rupee rewards when defeated, up to 50 if one is fast enough. Using a cheating device to extend the night, eventually the Stalchildren can grow to sizes rivaling Hyrule Castle. Unlike Stalfos, Stalchildren were never flesh and bone.[3]

In the original Japanese, these smaller Stalfos are called "Stalbabies", while the seemingly unrelated Skull Kid is called the Stalchild.

Majora's MaskEdit

Stalfos are rare in Majora's Mask, and the ones that fight like the ones in Ocarina of Time are the King of Ikana (called Igos du Ikana) and his guards.

Igos du IkanaEdit

When Link travels to Ikana, he eventually travels into the depths of Ikana Castle, where the skeletal ghost of the Ikana's king, Igos du Ikana, sits. He first sends his two guards after Link, who fight like normal Stalfos except that they will continually regenerate after being struck to the ground. To truly vanquish them, Link must burn away the curtains with Fire Arrows to allow light to enter the room again and reflect it on to the fallen corpses with the Mirror Shield. An interesting feature of the guards is that they will dance after Link when he plays the ocarina through the "Bremen Mask". After the two guards are defeated, the king himself attacks. The king is larger and more powerful than the other Stalfos, and he can breathe poison breath onto Link and even detach his head (in which case it will fly around the room and try to bite Link) and make his body invulnerable to attack. Defeating him will free his soul and he teaches Link the Elegy of Emptiness.

Skull KeetaEdit

Skull Keeta was the captain of the Ikana army. He lays asleep in the Ikana Graveyard until Link plays the Sonata of Awakening. After awakening, Skull Keeta walks away from Link who must catch up to him and engage in a battle. After being defeated, Skull Keeta reveals some of his past, and gives Link the Captain's Hat which allows him to talk with Stalchildren. He wished for Link to use it to tell his soldiers that the war ended before falling to pieces.

StalchildEdit

Stalchildren appear in the Ikana Graveyard at night. In this incarnation, they are the fallen soldiers of the kingdom of Ikana, who still guard their gravestones. Their captain, Skull Keeta, can be awakened, in which case he will run up the trail of the graveyard to test Link. When Link attacks him, he starts to attack Link himself with either his claws or by jumping high in the air and attempting to land on Link. When Link defeats him, Skull Keeta asks him to bring peaceful rest to his undead soldiers, and Link obtains the Captain's Hat, which make the Stalchildren harmless and will speak to Link when prompted to.

Stalchildren also appear in the second Golden Skulltula house, in the Great Bay. They are harmless here, do not attack Link, and give useful information on puzzles if spoken to with the Captain's Hat.

Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of AgesEdit

In both Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Stalfos come in two variants: cloaked Stalfos that shoot arrows or wield swords, and more regular Stalfos, some of which jump and throw bones. In Oracle of Seasons, Link meets a pirate captain who is a friendly Stalfos. It is later revealed in the linked game that the he was once the King of Labrynna, the husband to Queen Ambi, and was somehow transformed into a Stalfos while lost at sea.

Blue StalfosEdit

Blue Stalfos is the sub-boss of the Ancient Tomb in Oracle of Ages. He closely resembles the Grim Reaper, in that he wears a cloak and wields a scythe. He will shoot project tiles at Link, which if come in contact, will turn Link into a baby, making him vulnerable.

The Wind WakerEdit

Stalfos are rare in The Wind Waker, and their attacks are much different from previous forms. These Stalfos are much larger than previous incarnations, and they hobble around on short stubby legs while swinging around spiked maces. They wield the maces inexpertly and will spin across the room while using them. When Link slashes them or uses bombs, their bodies will shatter and their heads will bounce away from him. Link must destroy the heads or else they will reassemble. Link can also cut them in half in which case their torso and legs will separate and walk around. Taking the Stalfos' mace when it's shattered and waiting until they reassemble will cause the Stalfos to pull off its arm and use it as a weapon. Dropping the mace, however, cancels this.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

In Four Swords Adventures, Stalfos appear as minions of the four Big Dark Stalfos. Their appearance is the same as in The Wind Waker minus the clubs. Gibdos in this game are revealed to be Stalfos wrapped in mummy-like bandaging and once a Gibdo is defeated, it's inner self, the Stalfos appears in the Dark World where the player must journey into the Dark World in order to finish the job.

Big Dark StalfosEdit

The Big Dark Stalfos are four large powerful Stalfos that guard the green, red, blue, and purple Royal Jewels as bosses. They are in fact the cursed and corrupted forms of the Knights of the Royal Jewels and must be defeated in order for the curse to be lifted.

The Minish CapEdit

There are two types of Stalfos in The Minish Cap, blue Stalfos and red Stalfos. The blue ones will dash towards Link and try to jump on him. The red ones however, can throw bones. Sometimes a Stalfos may disguise itself as one of the breakable skulls, during which Link can actually suck in the Stalfos in skull form with the "Gust Jar" item and destroy it. When using the Gust Jar on Stalfos that are walking around in full body, it removes the head, and the body will wander around slowly. A decapitated Stalfos can not notice Link or attack, but hurts him if touched.

Freshly-Picked Tingle's Rosy RupeelandEdit

In Freshly-Picked Tingle's Rosy Rupeeland, the Stalfos pirate captain from Oracle of Seasons returns.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In Twilight Princess there are several different types of Stalfos. Stalfos like those in Ocarina of Time have returned, but with the characteristics of Skeleton Warriors from Link to the Past, as Link must drop a bomb (or use a bomb arrow or the Ball and Chain item) to totally crush their bones and defeat them. If any other weapon is used against then the Stalfos will break into pieces, but the bones will then soon pull themselves together and recreate the Stalfos. The Stalfos in this game carry swords and have glowing green "eyes" similar to those of Igos du Ikana's henchmen. Stalfos first appear in the Arbiter's Grounds, and make a few appearances afterwards.

StalkinEdit

Stalkin are miniature skeletons armed with equally small tridents. They are extremely weak, but emerge from underground in large swarms.

StallordEdit

Main page: Stallord

StaltroopsEdit

Staltroops are armored undead summoned by Stallord, during the first phase of the boss battle with it. They are used by Stallord to block Link's "Spinner" item, and do not attack him directly, despite being armed with swords and shields.

StalhoundsEdit

File:Stalhound.jpg
Stalhound from Twilight Princess

Skeletal dogs, called Stalhounds, also appear in Hyrule Field at night, similar to the Stalchildren of Ocarina of Time. They circle Link and jump at him to attack. The player is eventually forced to fight a whole pack of Stalhounds located near the South Gate of Hyrule Castle Town in order to recover an item stolen from Link's friend Ilia.

Phantom HourglassEdit

Stalfos frequently appear in the Northeastern quadrant, which is reached late in the game. They are quite common on the Isle of the Dead and the Isle of Ruins, as well as in the 7th dungeon, Mutoh's Temple. Two different varieties appear; the more common ones are found in the overworld, and almost identical to The Minish Cap's Stalfos. Their main means of attack is to jump away from Link's sword while throwing bones at him. The second type, which only appear in Mutoh's Temple, wield swords (in a rather clumsy and awkward fashion), and wear helmets similar to those of the Stalfos from The Wind Waker. Both can be defeated by removing their skulls (with either the sword or the Grappling Hook) and destroying them, or by smashing them to bits with the Hammer. They frequently disguise themselves as ordinary skeletons, rising up to attack only when Link comes too close.

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Stalfos Knight at the Great Hyrule Encyclopedia". Zelda.com. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/s.jsp#StalfosKnights. Retrieved 2007-06-08. 
  2. "Anybody who comes into the forest will be lost. Everybody will become a Stalfos. Everybody, Stalfos." Template:Cite video game
  3. "Stalchild at the Great Hyrule Encyclopedia". Zelda.com. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/s.jsp#Stalchid. Retrieved 2007-06-08. 
Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Wallmaster

Wallmasters are monsters that appear in the Legend of Zelda series.

AppearancesEdit

Wallmasters first appeared in The Legend of Zelda. They appeared as giant blue hands that came out of the wall. If one hit Link, it took him back to the entrance of the dungeon, no matter how deep into it he was. As an additional annoyance, if Link picked up a clock, Wallmasters that hadn't yet left the wall were unreachable until he left the room. Wallmasters were one of the most loathed monsters in the game, due to the apprehension accompanying any player unfortunate to become victim to it, punctured by its signature 'roar' before its killing strike. It would appear as an inescapable shadow over the player's position, then drop down after a certain interval of stalking the player. However, they had a fairly high rate of dropping rupees (especially in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask).

In The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past they are found in the dungeon in Skull Woods, and in Ganon's Tower. While they can be killed, a room can never be cleared of them. They are, however, fairly easy to avoid. Their fall from the ceiling is proceeded by a dropping sound, and their shadow appearing on the ground.

In the game The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time they take the form of dead hands with clawlike fingernails. When a player enters a room that contains Wallmasters, Navi will warn the player to "watch for the shadows of monsters that hang from the ceiling." They can be found in the Forest Temple, the Shadow Temple, the Spirit Temple, the Bottom of the Well, the Gerudo Training Ground, and Ganon's Castle. In The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, they could be found at the bottom of the Ikana Well, and acted exactly the same as they did in Ocarina of Time, although the player receives no warning of their presence.

In The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess a similar enemy, known as a Zant's Hand, is found in the Palace of Twilight. There are two of them, and each is found holding a 'Sol.' Link needs both in order to access a later part of the dungeon. However, unlike in earlier games, these followed Link only once he took the Sol. Once they catch him, they steal the Sol and return it to its starting place. They are also able to pass through doors of certain rooms.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Enemies/Wizzrobe

File:Wizzrobe.jpg
A Wizzrobe from The Wind Waker.

Wizzrobes are magic-using enemies from The Legend of Zelda series. They attack Link, the protagonist and player character, with different magic attacks. Wizzrobe's name is assumed to be a portmanteau of the words "wizard" and "robe".

CharacteristicsEdit

Wizzrobes often wear long robes that covers their body along with a pointy hat, similar to wizards in popular culture. Their faces usually cannot be seen, except for a pair of glowing eyes. Wizzrobes appearing throughout the Zelda series show up only in dungeons, except for in The Wind Waker, where they sometimes appear on sea platforms.

AppearancesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Wizzrobes first appeared in the first game of the series, The Legend of Zelda. They come in orange and blue variations. The orange Wizzrobes disappear and reappear around the room and shoot magic at Link, but only in a straight line, while the blue Wizzrobes move freely around the room and attack whenever Link is in their line of fire. The blue ones also have the ability to enter into the doorways of the rooms and to phase across barriers. In this game, Wizzrobes wear hooded robes and cast their magic with the aid of a magical wand.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

In The Adventure of Link, Wizzrobes appear like figures with white robes and pointed white hoods that cover their faces completely, having a red cross where their faces should be. They appear, throw a spell at Link, and vanish again. Wizzrobes are invulnerable to sword attacks, and can only be defeated with the Reflect spell. When Link casts Reflect, a Wizzrobe's magic is reflected back at it, killing it. Carock, a larger and stronger form of a Wizzrobe, also serves as a boss later in the game.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, Wizzrobes are essentially the same as The Legend of Zelda, but with updated graphics. They gain the pointed, wide-brimmed hats they wear almost consistently later on, and begin resembling black mages at this point.

Link's AwakeningEdit

In Link's Awakening, they are again the same as in The Legend of Zelda, but with no tougher form. They are however not affected by the sword and require 4 arrows or a bomb to finish off. They can be stunned with a boomerang to give the player a better chance to vanquish them. They are also instantly destroyed by hitting them with a thrown item such as a pot, or a stunned Wizzrobe (they usually appear in groups).

Majora's MaskEdit

In Majora's Mask Wizzrobes are very different in appearance from their earlier appearances. They have blue skin, zombie-like faces, and wear short robes. Wizzrobe is a miniboss in four areas in the game, including Snowhead Temple and Ikana. They have two attack methods; first they move between warp tiles and shoot blasts of ice or fire then warp to another tile. Second, they have decoys to confuse Link; the real one spins around on one of the warp tiles (his location is the red dot on the map). In this game, Wizzrobe was accidentally spelled with one Z.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, they are again similar to their appearance in The Legend of Zelda. Green Wizzrobes merely sink into the ground leaving only their hat exposed. Red Wizzrobes are stronger and teleport randomly around the room after firing. Blue Wizzrobes are stronger still and act like the blue Wizzrobes of The Legend of Zelda.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Wind Waker, Wizzrobes wear robes and bird-like masks resembling the beak of a toucan, and teleport around the room and shoot magic at Link from afar, usually in mid-air and out of reach of Link's sword. Red ones shoot three fireballs at a time at Link while the yellow version can shoot fireballs and summon other enemies. Blue ones are similar to the red ones, but more powerful. The miniboss Wizzrobes are like the yellow hooded ones, but more powerful and can summon bigger enemies such as Darknuts, Moblins, and even other Wizzrobes. They also produce a distinctive chime so that the player would notice when one pops up, and they howl when defeated.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

In Four Swords Adventures, Wizzrobes appear the same as in The Legend of Zelda, but some have the ability to shoot fire and ice, and sometimes suck out a player's Force Gems. They also have sound clips from The Wind Waker.

The Minish CapEdit

In The Minish Cap they are the same as in Four Swords Adventures. They appear taller and more slender than their previous appearances and seem to have long, white beards. Fire Wizzrobes would shoot fire, while Ice Wizzrobes would shoot ice, burning or freezing Link, respectively. The Ice Wizzrobe is easily killed with the Flame Lantern item. The Flame Lantern also works on the Fire and normal Wizzrobe.

Recurring enemies in The Legend of Zelda series
Armos · ChuChu · Darknut · Deku Baba · Floormaster · Gohma · Iron Knuckle · Keese · Lizalfos · Moblin · Octorok · Peahat · Poe · ReDead · Stalfos · Wallmaster · Wizzrobe



Bosses/Gohdan

File:Zww-gohdan.jpg
Gohdan as he appears in The Wind Waker

Gohdan is a boss from the Legend of Zelda series, appearing in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker and The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap. It resembles a giant stone head with detached hands, on the palms of which are eyes.

Gohdan is not a minion of Ganon, but rather a creation of the gods to test the hero at the time. It is the only boss that is not a minion of Ganon.

It is very similar to a phantom shadow creature in Ocarina of Time called Bongo Bongo. The body has one large red eye, and cannot be seen without the Lens of Truth. It is defeated by firing arrows into the hands, then into the eye.

In The Wind WakerEdit

Gohdan made its debut in The Wind Waker. It resembles Bongo Bongo, though it is mechanical and posesses two eyes. It uses many of Bongo Bongo's attacks, but can attack with fireballs from its mouth. It is destroyed by first shooting arrows into the eyes on the hands, then both eyes on the head. While stunned, a bomb must be thrown into its mouth.

In The Minish CapEdit

It returns in The Minish Cap as Mazaal. It is almost identical to Gohdan, but colored gold with pink eyes. As always, the hands must be shot down first with arrows, but then must be attacked with Link's sword. After both hands are gone, Link must go Minish-sized, enter the head piece, and attack the glowing pillar hidden among other, non-glowing ones. After the first part of the battle, the head is darkened and filled with dirt, and Link must use the Mole Mitts to dig around inside the head before locating the correct pillar.



Bosses/Poe Sisters

The Poe Sisters are four fictional ghosts from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time and The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. The sisters include (from eldest to youngest) Meg, Beth, Joelle, and Amy. They are named after the four main characters of Louisa May Alcott's 1868 novel Little Women. The Poe Sisters are the mini-bosses of the Forest Temple.

MegEdit

Meg is the eldest of the Poe Sisters. She favors the color purple/violet, and prefers the strategy of making illusions. Of the four Poe Sisters, which can all be considered one big mini-boss, Meg is the common choice as the Forest Temple's mini-boss, as no guide or other resource addresses the sisters as a mini-boss.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Meg is characterized by her sinister, evil-looking eyes and elegant headress which the other sisters lack. In Ocarina of Time, Meg is found stealing the Forest Temple's elevator's purple torch and leaving to an unknown art gallery. The gallery is speculated to be the one that the boss, Phantom Ganon, lurks in, as that is the only remaining art gallery after the other sisters'. Meg is next found near the end of the temple after defeating Amy. From anywhere outside the fenced center of the elevator room, Meg can be safely observed (and heard) as to be crying, probably for her lost sisters.

To defeat Meg, the player must decide which of Meg's orbiting illusions is the real Meg (the real one spins in place as she orbits around Link), then shoot the real one with an arrow (or the Hook Shot) before the illusions--and Meg--attack. Meg is the only Poe Sister who receives mini-boss battle music. Defeating Meg awards the player with access to the temple's basement.

Majora's MaskEdit

In Majora's Mask, Meg is found being held captive by the Ghost Hunter in Ikana Canyon. For a handsome fee, the Ghost Hunter will allow the player to battle the Poe Sisters in a limited amount of time for a Piece of Heart. If this Meg is the same as Ocarina of Time's, it can be speculated that these Poe Sisters are just parallel versions. Meg will be the last sister to battle after defeating Joelle and Beth. She is armed once more with her illusions.

JoelleEdit

Joelle is one of the two middle sisters of the Poe Sisters, four undead sisters that haunt the Forest Temple. Joelle may have a closer bond with Beth than with Amy or Meg, as Joelle and Beth are always grouped together. Joelle favors the color red, and so wears a red dress and holds a red torch, which she stole from the elevator room in the Forest Temple. Like Beth, Joelle hides in an art gallery with three pictures, all possessed by Joelle.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Joelle can be characterized by her cartoon-remniscent, frowning eyes and her red-orange coloration. She is first seen in the elevator room stealing the normal torch's flame. While the other Poe Sisters depart for the courtyard, Joelle goes to the southwest corner. Joelle is found before the others, in a room resembling a mirror-version of Beth's art gallery. To battle Joelle, the player first must acquire the Fairy Bow, located in the room found between Joelle and Beth's rooms. The player must shoot whichever portrait shows a picture of Joelle on it. When hit, the picture vanishes, but if the player is too close Joelle will move to a different painting when looked at. Once all three portraits are gone, Joelle will do battle. Joelle fights like a normal Poe, except that she does not float away when hurt, and takes more hits to defeat.

Majora's MaskEdit

Along with the other Poe Sisters, Joelle is held captive by the Ghost Hunter in Ikana Canyon. Unlike Amy and Meg, Joelle teams up with Beth to battle Link. Battle Beth first and block Joelle attacks well shooting Beth with arrows.

BethEdit

Beth is one of the two middle sisters of the Poe Sisters, four art-loving ghosts that haunt the corridors of the Forest Temple. Beth probably shares a bond with Joelle, as they are always grouped together. Beth favors the color blue, and wears blue wherever she goes. Like Joelle, Beth hides in an art gallery with three pictures, all possessed by Beth.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Beth can be characterized by her flat, almost symboling bored eyes. These eyes are the most unique of the sisters'. Beth is first seen in the Forest Temple's elevator room stealing the blue torch's flame and running off to one of the two courtyards (Meg heads to the other one). Beth is usually categorized as the second Poe Sister battled, but Joelle and Beth can be battled in any order. Beth's room looks like a mirror-version of Joelle's art gallery. The two follow the same strategy, and so battling them has the same requirements. However, Beth is stronger and harder to defeat than Joelle.

Majora's MaskEdit

Like the other sisters, Beth is found being held captive by the Ghost Hunter in Ikana Canyon. Beth teams up with Joelle in the Ghost Hunter's Challenge.

AmyEdit

Amy is the youngest of the Poe Sisters, and one of the two (the other is Meg) sisters that focuses more on strategy than on brawn. Amy is the smallest of the sisters as well. Amy favors the color green, and is associated with that color. Amy is the last Poe Sister with a located art gallery (even though it holds only one painting).

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Amy is characterized by her comic-style, cheerful eyes and her swift movements. Amy is seen stealing the Forest Temple's elevator room's green torch. She then heads for the room's inaccessible balcony that connects with the eastern courtyard. The young sister is also usually categorized as the third sister to battle. Amy's gallery holds a single painting, and is located at the end of Ocarina of Time's infamous Topsy-Turvy Room (although it consists of three or four halls), which was titled the most topsy-turvy location in Nintendo history (the temple itself was tied with Majora's Mask's Stone Tower Temple). The player must go through twisted halls dotted with crooked and rotatable chambers, in the middle of which are Joelle and Beth. The player must also navigate the courtyard's section of the "room," a wide hall with a collapsing, checkerboard-like ceiling. In the gallery itself, the player must fire an arrow at Amy's Portrait.

This designates the beginning of a timed block puzzle, in which the player must push and pull large, decorated blocks so that they depict Amy's Portrait. To jumble the player, Amy has added a decoy block, which depicts part of Beth's Portrait. If the player fails in the alloted time, the blocks flip themselves, and the player must start again. When the puzzle is solved, Amy will attack. Amy is slightly weaker than the other sisters, but is faster. Once Amy is defeated, the door to the elevator room's balcony unlocks, and Meg will appear in the elevator room (assuming Joelle and Beth are already gone).

Majora's MaskEdit

Amy is found being held captive by the Ghost Hunter in Ikana Canyon with her sisters. Amy is the first Poe Sister battled in the Ghost Hunter's mini-game.



Bosses/Vaati

Vaati (グフー, Gufū), the Wind Mage, is a fictional character and antagonist from The Legend of Zelda series of video games. His most common appearance is a black orb with a single eye, although his original appearance was that of a purple Minish. He is the second-most frequently recurring major villain in the series, after Ganon. In the 210th edition of Nintendo Power, Vaati was listed as number two of the top five Zelda series bosses, surpassed only by Ganon.

BiographyEdit

The Minish CapEdit

Vaati's first appearance chronologically is in The Minish Cap, wherein he is a young sorcerer wielding powerful dark magic, who one day unleashes monsters upon Hyrule and turns Princess Zelda to stone. He appears several times throughout the game to taunt the hero Link, and often emits a high-pitched evil laugh upon his entrances.

File:Vaatiminish.jpg
Vaati's humanoid form in The Minish Cap

Later in the game, it is revealed that Vaati was once a Minish who became corrupted by the evil that lay in the hearts of men, and who used the Wishing Cap, created by his former master Ezlo, to transform himself into a Hylian sorcerer. Vaati desires ultimate power, and seeks to obtain the mystical light force—a source of limitless magical power that is hidden within Princess Zelda. When he finally learns of its location, he takes the princess to Hyrule Castle to complete his plan. There, Vaati manages to steal most of the light force from Princess Zelda, using it to transform himself into a god-like being in order to combat Link. He is defeated and is forced to assume the form of a one-eyed demon in a desperate attempt to continue the battle. Despite his newfound power, Vaati is ultimately defeated by Link and is later sealed away by the Four Sword, a reforged Picori Blade with the ability to split its wielder into four separate entities.

Four SwordsEdit

Vaati next appeared in Four Swords, which was actually his first appearance in terms of game release dates. In the beginning of the game, Princess Zelda senses a weakening of Vaati's seal and asks Link to accompany her in repairing it. Vaati breaks free at this point and kidnapps her with the intention of forcing her to marry him. Link draws the Four Sword and eventually seals Vaati with it, rescuing Zelda.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

In Four Swords Adventures, Dark Link tricks Link into releasing Vaati. Dark Link ambushes the shrine maidens while they are visiting the enshrined Four Sword and seals them all within magical crystals which he took with him, similarly to events in A Link to the Past. When Link draws the Four Sword to battle Dark Link, Vaati breaks the seal and escapes. It is revealed only at the very end of Four Swords Adventures, in a twist ending, that Vaati was being used by Ganon (though it is hinted at as early as the fifth level). Ganon had used the Dark Mirror to create evil clones of Link whom he ordered to abduct Princess Zelda and the other shrine maidens so that he might siphon their power to himself and take over the world. Before facing Ganon, Link fights and defeats Vaati once more, appearing to finally kill him rather than merely sealing him with the Four Sword. However, when he is "killed", dark waves appear, similar to that of Dark Link going into the Dark World, so whether Vaati died or escaped remains to be seen.



Races/Hylian

In the Legend of Zelda series of video games, Hylian generally refers to the Hylian race, a race of humans with certain magical abilities. They have pointed pixie-like ears, and are often mistaken for elves. It is believed that these ears allow them to hear the gods and that they were created to tell the other races their message.

Hyrulean means from or related to the mythical land of Hyrule.

In Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, most Hylians live in the Hyrule Castle Town, though a few individuals inhabit land outside of this town, namely Talon of the Lon Lon Ranch and the Lakeside Scientist.

Many items created by the orginal Hylians make reapperences in other Zelda games, like the Master Sword. The Book of Murdora in Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past allows Link to translate things written in the ancient Hylian language.

The Hylian written language is derived from Japanese hiragana, katakana, and romaji. The script is syllabic or more precisely moraic, and each symbol represents either a vowel, consonant-vowel combination, or a syllable final n.



Races/Zora

A Zora is a species from The Legend of Zelda series, found in varying forms. Notably, in many games Zora are either friendly or hostile depending on the game, rather then categorically friendly like the Rito or the Hylians.

Friendly ZoraEdit

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

The Zoras in Ocarina of Time take a drastic turn from the ones in the earlier games (in which they were called 'Zola', 'Zora's Spawn' or 'river zora', depending upon the game). In those games, they were more monstrous, and breathed fire, while in the 3D games, they were humanoid, blue and scaley, with a more gentle look, and a decidedly more amiable disposition. Zoras primarily reside in the Zora's Domain, while some may appear in Lake Hylia. They can exist both in and out of water, but they work best in water. There are two Zora scales obtainable in Ocarina of Time; the Silver Scale, from the Zora in Zora's Domain as a reward for winning the diving minigame, and the Golden Scale, a reward for catching a giant fish.

Princess RutoEdit

Princess Ruto is a young Zora whose job it is to feed Jabu-Jabu. When Link arrived at Zora's Domain, she had mysteriously disappeared. Link finds a Letter in a Bottle from her, and gains access to Jabu-Jabu's Domain. He enters Jabu-Jabu's Belly through the means of feeding him a Fish, causing Link to be eaten as well. Ruto is found in his stomach, and she demands that Link carry her around and help her find the Zora's Sapphire she lost. She eventually is trapped by Big Octo, saved, and later trapped again by Barinade, the boss of the dungeon. Upon defeating him, Link gets a scolding from Ruto, and they leave Jabu-Jabu's stomach. She gives him the Zora's Sapphire, which, in the Zora ways, makes them engaged. Later, in the future, Ruto has blossomed into a woman, and encounters Link in the Water Temple, and reminds him that they were to be wed. Once Link defeats the temple boss, Morpha, Ruto realizes she is a Sage, and thus cannot marry Link, letting him off the hook.

King Zora XVIEdit

King Zora is the King of all of the Zoras in the Zora's Domain. He is a large, rotund Zora, differing in appearance from the sleek, thin appearance of Zoras in general. He is the father of Princess Ruto. In the future, Zora's Domain is frozen over, and King Zora is encased in ice.

Majora's MaskEdit

The Zoras remain, for the most part, exactly the same as the Zoras in Ocarina of Time. The only unique Zoras are the members of the Indigo-Gos. The only location that Zoras live in that you can visit is Zora Hall, located in the Great Bay. Most Zoras are found further out in sea, although the player can not go there.

Indigo-Go'sEdit

The Indigo-Go's are a band consisting of six Zoras.

File:IndigoGos.jpg
The Indigo-Go's
  • Lulu - The lead member of the Indigo-Go's, who has a beautiful singing voice. Unfortunately, when her eggs were stolen by the Gerudo Pirates, she lost her voice, and cannot regain it unless she hears a certain song played on Mikau's guitar. Her voice awakens the Giant Turtle, which takes Link to the Great Bay Temple. She was modelled after the adult Princess Ruto from Ocarina of Time
  • Mikau - The lead guitarist in the Indigo-Go's. Mikau is covered in many tattoos, which no other Zora seems to have. Link first encounters Mikau when he sees the guitarist floating lifelessly in the ocean. When Link brings the wounded Mikau to shore, Mikau gets to his feet and in a rather humorous manner, he tells Link what happened by playing a song and singing. Afterwards, he collapses. Link then plays the Song of Healing, sending Mikau's spirit off, leaving a Zora Mask behind, which allows Link to become a Zora.
  • Evan - Evan is the band leader, and the keyboardist, of the Indigo-Go's. He looks very different from any Zora, featuring more golden colored scales. He sent Mikau to retrieve Lulu's missing Eggs. Evan writes the songs for the band, and dislikes it when others write songs without his input. His scales may not be one-of-a-kind, as the Golden Scale is similar to his scales.
  • Japas - Japas is the bassist in the Indigo-go's. He is friends with Mikau, and has fins stylized in 'punk rock' hair. Uses a piece of a giant crustacian for the body of his bass guitar.
  • Tijo - The drummer of the Indigo-go's. He is somewhat larger than the average Zora, and has a large drum set. Knows a little bit about what's troubling Lulu. His drums are made up of large, puffed up fish. He looks more like a manta then a Zora.
  • Toto - Toto is the manager of the Indigo-go's. He is found at the Mayor's Office, trying to arrange the concert in Clock Town. He somewhat resembles King Zora in shape, but has a different face and is much smaller.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In Oracle of Ages, Zoras live in an underwater city, which Link can access after he has acquired the Mermaid Suit. In Present time, King Zora has perished, and Jabu-Jabu is a large fish, but without King Zora's consent, Link cannot enter Jabu-Jabu. In the Past, the king is gravely ill, and requires a Potion in order to survive. Link can get one from Syrup, Maple or a Gasha Nut, and once the king is given it, his health improves. Link asks King Zora to allow him entrance into Jabu-Jabu to get an Essence of Time, but Jabu-Jabu is too small. But Link can go into the future, and gain access to the mature Jabu-Jabu. Zoras only appear in Oracle of Seasons through a linked game, and will give you an item. There is also an old Zora far away from the Zora City, who will give you the Broken Sword in exchange for a Sea Ukulele. The Oracle games are the only two games to feature both friendly and hostile Zoras.

The Wind WakerEdit

Zoras are supposedly extinct in The Wind Waker, but the accepted theory is that the Ritos are evolutions of Zoras. This theory came to light on account of the fact that Medli is the descendant of an ancient Sage, Laruto, who is a Zora. Ritos are bird people, who gain their wings through acquiring a scale from Valoo.

EvolutionEdit

It is possible that the Zoras have evolved into a bird-like race in The Wind Waker. This half-bird, half-human race known as Ritos make multiple references to the Zoras. The most convincing is the fact that Medli shares the bloodline of the Zora Earth Sage Laruto. Also, we see the symbol of the Zora Sapphire (which is used as the Zora's royal family symbol) in multiple places on the Ritos' home of Dragon Roost Isle. It is unknown why this change would have occurred since the Zoras in Oracle of Ages have been shown to be able to live in the sea off the coast of the island of Labrynna; however, unlike the Great Sea, the Zoras seemed to be living in a controlled environment without interruption from other sea dwellers. Regardless, the name similarity between "Rito" and "Princess Ruto" indicates strong evidence for this possibility. Another piece of strong evidence is the fact that besides the Hylian Royal Family, there are no other races that use the title Prince/Princess other then the Zora, and in Wind Waker, the Rito are the only ones left who use that title.

On the other hand, it is also possible that the Great Sea, once sunken, reverted Ritos to an aquatic state once again. It is also implied that the home of the Zoras in The Wind Waker is actually at Great Fish Island which was the home of the Great Jabun (who speaks ancient Hylian and whose name is an obvious reference to Jabu Jabu) and was home to some race before the island was destroyed by Ganon. The dragon that lives atop Dragon Roost Isle, the volcano, the appearance of bomb rocks, and the red stone that the player acquires there is a bigger reference to the Goron area of Ocarina of Time than the Zora area. Yet it could have been that in desperation, after the great floods the Zora's nation was destroyed by Seahats and such, and that they used grappling hooks to get to new lands. The dragon on dragonroost island gave the zoras scales, meaning they were Magically transformed, not naturally evolved.

It must be taken into account however that Zoras still exist in The Legend of Zelda as enemies, although the game seems to take place after Ocarina of Time and The Wind Waker; the manual, however, lists these enemies as Zolas, and it is unknown whether these two names truly denote two separate races or species or they are the same and the spelling is a result of confusion in the Japanese language of the l and r sounds in the Japanese phonology. An evolutionary offshoot or a hybrid is more likely than the prospect of an entire population taking this evolutionary course, especially considering that the Zoras in Oracle of Ages denote a difference between the "noble sea Zoras" and the "savage, vulgar river Zoras."

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In both Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, Zoras appear as enemies, acting exactly as past Zoras. However, there are also Zoras that are similar to the ones in Ocarina of Time in Oracles of Ages. In that game, the more gentle Zoras make a distinction between them and the monstrous Zoras, claiming that they are river Zoras as opposed to noble sea Zoras.

Hostile ZoraEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

In The Legend of Zelda, Zoras were mistranslated as Zolas, and even now, people interpret Zolas as different from Zoras. Zoras are water-dwelling fish monsters that shoot fireballs at Link. The fireballs are only blockable by a Magic Shield. They dive down into the water and come back up to attack passersby.

A Link to the PastEdit

Zoras (called Zora's Spawn here) appear all over Hyrule. They act almost exactly as the Zoras in the original Zelda act, but look more advanced. This is the first Zelda to feature a unique Zora (the only creature in the game to actually go by the name 'Zora'), who lives beneath a waterfall. He offers to sell you Flippers for 500 Rupees. In BS The Legend of Zelda: Stone Tablets of Antiquity, he's actually called King Zora, and at certain times in a certain week, he will offer them to you for 300 Rupees. He also gives Link the ability to use the warping Whirlpools in both the Light World and Dark World. This is the first and only game to have the enemy Zoras able to jump high in the air and walk on land and shallow water. Often give Bombs. In the Dark World, Zoras take the shape of a strange, one-eyed fish.

Link's AwakeningEdit

Zoras only appear as enemies, with the exception of an invisible Zora, who is only viewable with a Magnifying Lens in The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX. Talking to him gets the Photographer Mouse to take a picture of Link and the Zora, which is printable with the Game Boy Printer.

Oracle of Ages and Oracle of SeasonsEdit

In both Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, Zoras appear as enemies, acting exactly as past Zoras. However, there are also Zoras that are similar to the ones in Ocarina of Time in Oracles of Ages. In that game, the more gentle Zoras make a distinction between them and the monstrous Zoras, claiming that they are river Zoras as opposed to noble sea Zoras.



Races/Rito

In the fictional world of the The Legend of Zelda series of video games, the Rito (or "Bird People") are a "race" (species) of bird-like humanoids that first appeared in The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker. Their main habitat is on Dragon Roost Island, in which all known Rito reside. They have a tribal elder, with numerous followers and elaborately dressed guards. No Rito is born with wings, and must visit the tribes' guardian, the great dragon Valoo, to receive one of his scales which enables them to grow wings. It is a coming of age ceremony of the Rito, to journey to the great Valoo to receive their scale. Children with no wings are called chicks.

Rito are viewed upon by outsiders somewhat dubiously. Some have an inexplicable bigotry directed towards them. Still, Rito are widely accepted as mail carriers, as only they can traverse the seas without cumbersome ships. Rito are capable of flying quickly, and full-grown members can carry humans for a short time.

The Rito may be inspired by the Watarara race in one of the Zelda mangas (generally considered not to be canon). These people were more like giant birds than humans, but had a similar gaining of wings past a certain age and the same chieftain leadership structure.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

It is implied in the game that they are the desendants of the Zora race, as one Rito, Medli, tells Link that the Rito were once without wings, and it is also revealed in the game that she is a descendant of the Zora sage Laruto.



Races/Goron

Gorons are a fictional humanoid rock-eating race in the Legend of Zelda game series.

Goron biologyEdit

Gorons eat rocks and as they grow older they develop rocky growths on their backs. Since Gorons eat rocks, the Gorons themselves gets heavier. With their heavy weight, they are hopeless on water because they'll sink to the bottom. Some Gorons grow to an extremely large size for no apparent reason. They can curl up to look like odd-shaped stones or boulders. This is also how they sleep. When curled-up, some Gorons can roll around rapidly. Gorons who are endowed with fairy magic grow metal spikes when they do, which can be used as a weapon. Gorons are also resistant to heat, to the point of being able to walk through lava. This is a valuable capability when searching for food inside mountains.

The Goron "special crop"Edit

Gorons grow Bomb Flowers, their "special crop" which resemble bombs in both appearance and function. These look like a standard bomb with a flower growing on top, and 3 large leaves growing outwards. Underneath the "bomb" is the stem (with the leaves growing out), but normally this is not visible. Bomb Flowers break easily from their stems but once plucked they soon explode. The stem and leaves of the flower are bomb-proof so a bomb-flower can't blow itself up, probably a defense-mechanism. Apparently Gorons use the plant for mining.

Notable GoronsEdit

Goron cultureEdit

Apparently Goron culture revolves around family, honor and strength (compare Klingon). Somewhat oddly it appears that they don't find mining their ancestors corpses dishonorable or unethical (see below). They are a peaceful, sometimes lazy race with little ability to defend themselves, although they are quite large and strong.



Races/Gerudo

The Gerudo is a tribe of thieves in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time. Their race consists entirely of women, but legend has it that a man is born every hundred years. This man is destined to be the king of the Gerudo. They have dark skin, red hair, and a rather bird-like appearance, causing some to link them to the Rito. They are known to have relations with Hylian men, who they form relationships with or simply use for procreation.

HistoryEdit

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Link first enounters the Gerudo when he is a child. Princess Zelda tells him to look through the window, and he sees Ganondorf, the legendary king of the Gerudo and rumored to be the "Prince of Evil". He later confronts Ganondorf outside of Hyrule Castle and is promptly defeated. However, this encounter results in Link receiving the Ocarina of Time from Princess Zelda. Link vows revenge against Ganondorf and continues on his quest. He travels to the Temple of Time and uses his Spiritual Stones and ocarina to reach the Chamber of the Master Sword. He grabs the sword, hoping to use it against the Gerudo king, but is imprisoned for seven years so that he may become a true hero. Menwhile, Ganondorf enters the Sacred Realm through the portal the Master Sword left, stealing the Triforce of Power and becoming the new King of Hyrule.

Seven years later, Link wakes up and continues on his quest.

The last overworld area Link encounters as an adult is Gerudo Valley, home of Gerudo Fortress, the desert stronghold the Gerudo call home.

Link sneaks into the Gerudos' tightly-guarded compound and frees several unjustly-captured prisoners inside. A Gerudo who has been following him comes out of the shadows and praises his abilities. She then gives him the "Gerudo Membership Card," a proof of ID letting all Gerudos know that he is a friend. From this day forward, Link becomes an honorary Gerudo.

The Gerudo happily help Link train with his bow on their archery range and let him test skills in their Gauntlet. Once Link has completed the Gauntlet, he receives the fabled Ice Arrows. The Gerudo tell him that he must cross the Haunted Wasteland to reach their Spirit Temple.

When Link crosses the Haunted Wasteland at the edge of Gerudo's Fortress, sure enough, he finds the Spirit Temple. According to the owl, Kaepora Gaebora, he must return to the Temple of Time and become a child again to finish his work in the area and gain full access to the next sage. Link does so and returns to his childhood. He then returns to the temple where he meets the second signifigant Gerudo character.

The woman he meets is Nabooru, the second in command of the Gerudo tribe. Nabooru is a celebrated hater of Ganondorf and she protests his evil ways. When she finds out that Link agrees, she enlists his help in finding the Silver Gauntlets, the only way into the body of the Spirit Temple (and a fine piece of treasure).

Link retrieves the Gauntlets, but meets up with Nabooru too late. She is captured by Koume and Kotake, two old Gerudo witches.

Once Nabooru disappears, Link keeps the gauntlets for himself so he can use them as an adult to gain access to the Spirit Temple and try to save Nabooru. He returns to adulthood and sets on his way.

Once Link has braved the trials of the Spirit Temple, he fights an Iron Knuckle, who turns out to be an imprisoned Nabooru. Koume and Kotake return to re-imprison Nabooru and subsuquently start a fight with Link. They use their powers of ice and fire to try to destroy the young hero, but to no avail. Link has already found the Mirror Shield and uses it to reflect their powers back on them.

Soundly defeated, the witches reveal their true form: the evil Twinrova sorceress sisters who were the surrogate mothers of Ganondorf.

After destroying the evil witch, Link finds Nabooru in the Chamber of the Sages. She is the sixth sage, the Sage of Spirit.

Link, having awakened the sages, travels to Ganondorf's dark castle and faces him in battle. Ganondorf, being brought up by accomplished sorceresses, tries to destroy Link with magic power, but fails and is killed. With his "final breath," he knocks down the castle. Link escapes with Zelda and faces Ganondorf in a final battle. Ganondorf unleashes the true force of the Triforce of Power and turns into Ganon, the true King of Evil. Once felled, the former Gerudo king is imprisoned until further games in the Sacred Realm.



Races/Sheikah

The Sheikah were an ancient race from the Legend of Zelda video game series that swore to protect the Hylian Royal Family. They had elongated ears and wore clothes suitable for an active lifestyle. Their eyes were gray and they often had tatoos on their faces which suggested ferocity to their enemies. Some of the Sheikah were known to have levels of clairvoyancy and had red eyes. They were outcasts and feared in Hyrule. The most famous members were Impa, the maid of Princess Zelda, and Sheik, the guised alter ego of Princess Zelda herself. They were skilled in magical and combative arts, and their cultural pendant was an eye with three triangles above it (as if to imitate eyelashes) and a teardrop, to symbolize the betrayal of the Royal Family (according to the official Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time manga). Young males pierced their ears as a traditional rite of passage. Not much is known about their lifespan or other details about their lives. They were assumed to have become rare after the Imprisoning War, and became extinct after the Great Flood in the pre-Wind Waker era.



Races/Kokiri

The Kokiri are a fictional race of fairy folk in the Nintendo 64 game, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time who inhabit the Kokiri Forest. Cautious, child-like and secretive, the Kokiri believe that they will die if they leave the forest. (This is contradicted by Mido appearing in the Lon Lon Ranch in one scene, however.) Therefore, the Kokiri never leave the forest and know nothing about the outside, only the magics of the forest. Though they appear to be children, the Kokiri are actually ageless, and never grow old. Each Kokiri has a guardian fairy that functions as a friend, parent and teacher. They are watched over by the Deku Tree and later Saria the sage of the forest. Mido is their boss. The Kokiri are "the spirits of the forest" and were probably created by the deku tree. Kokiri always wear green tunics and the males wear green hats and have pointy ears. It is possible for a Kokiri to have green hair. It may be possible that the green-tunicked "twin lumberjacks" from A Link to the Past were Kokiri (compare: elf). Necessary for the well-being of the forest is a play done by the Kokiri children to initiate the Deku Tree's creation of new fairy orbs. Eventually, Kokiri children fade away, to make room for new Kokiri, who will spontaneously sprout from the trunk of the Great Deku Tree.

There have been two records of kokiri sages known to have aided the legendary hero Link. The first is Saria, the forest sage, who later guarded the kokiri forest from the sacred forest temple- as well as helped the Hero of Time in his quest to defeat a great evil.

The other is Fado, an earth sage, known for his excellent skill with the violin. He stayed in the earth temple for thousands of years- long after his kind had ceased to be- and prayed for the Master Sword, untill he was killed by the evil wizard Ganondorf. Upon his death he awakened his decendant Makar.

Over the years the kokiri folk failed to resemble children, and took on a more plant-like appearance, at wich point they ceased to be kokiri and were refered to as Koroks.

Notable Kokiri:



Races/Twili

The Twili are a fictional race of people appearing in the video game The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess. Originally they might have been Hylians, which were banished through the Mirror of Twilight for trying to control the Sacred Realm. They might have also descended from the Sheikah, as they are both referred to as lost tribes with dark magic, both having red irises and they both dwell in shadows. The Twili, having long forgotten the bonds with their ancestors, now live their peaceful lives in the Twilight Realm. The Twili are described as "interlopers" who tried to conquer the sacred realm with powerful magic but where banished to the twilight realm by the three light spirits in Hyrule.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Midna is the princess of the Twili. She is overthrown by Zant, when he receives great powers from Ganon. After both Ganon and Zant are defeated, Midna returns to the Twilight Realm as its princess. As she leaves, she shatters the Mirror of Twilight, forever closing the portal between the normal world and the Twilight Realm.

TechnologyEdit

The Twili appear to possess much more advanced technology than Hyrule, and possibly than those from Termina seen in Majora's Mask. One example would be their use of teleporting across locations using portals that appear rather digital, like a monitor's pixel display.

Additionally, when in the Twilight Realm, one will notice various aspects that seem futuristic to even our eyes, such as the lifts that appear from nowhere and are completely transparent, except for the glowing green shapes seen all around anything that is of Twilight origin (portals, Sols, etc.). Another example are the doors that open by themselves; this is one of the only Zelda games where dungeon doors are actually opened manually and that only the Oocca and Twili have locations that have automatically opening doors, in the City in the sky and Palace of Twilight dungeons respectively. These doors just have one green shape when inactive but when one opens them the green shape extends making more shapes around the door which opens it.

RelationshipsEdit

There are several similaraties between Twili and other races in the series. Please note that this is all speculation, and no connection has been presented by Nintendo.

Some similarities are with the Shiekahs , as both are described as wielders of Dark magic, have red irises and dwell in the shadows (even being referred to as 'the shadow folk'). Also the symbol of the Sheikah, a stylized eye with a tear drop, is present on Zant's throne.

Another race, though not featured in the series and is only briefly mentioned in 'Majora's Mask', are those that used Majora's Mask in their 'hexing rituals'. There are many similarites between the Twili and Majora's Mask itself, which implies that the Twili could be the same race. The similarities involve some shapes featured on Majora's Mask being present on Midna's helmet, the Fused Shadow (the eye especially). Zant's behaviour is very similar to creatures specific to Majora's Mask and the Mask itself, such as: Zant screeching in a similar fashion to Majora's Mask, he is a sympathetic villian much like the Skull Kid who wore the Mask, he has swords in his sleeves similar to the Garo Robes, his helmet and cloak combination looks like the Garo Masters fashion (and fights in a similar manner, see Garo Robes and Zant articles for comparisons). During the mention of those who used the Mask, the Happy Mask Salesman mentions that the mask was hidden in shadows, which the Twilight Realm is sometimes called (the Land of Shadow), which could explain that the Mask itself was involved with the wielders who attempted to enter the sacred realm and thus could of been the single entity that started the events of the games (although this is also speculation).

Another possibility is that at least a portion of the Gerudo tribe were the ones who gained the mysterious power of the Fused Shadows and were cast into the Twilight Realm. This would be supported by the Midna's story that the Twili race were originally a tribe of thieves and why the entrance to the Twilight Realm is located in the Gerudo Desert. As for appearance, Midna does have the classic red-orange hair of the Gerudo and her true form is tall and slender, just as the Gerudo women once were. Also, there is a Gerudo pattern and converted Gerudo symbol on the front of Zant's robe, which he wore even before his encounter with Ganondorf, whom he worshiped as a god. Perhaps it is most likely that the "interlopers" were a large group of the Gerudo, possibly most of the males, seeing as how time passes and the Gerudo tribe is composed of almost all females during the events of Ocarina of Time. After this banishment, the remaining Gerudo remain as nomads, outlaws, and thieves, finally making a settlement in the desert. Untold years, possibly centuries go by until Twilight Princess, in which the immortal Ganondorf appears to be the sole Gerudo, with the desert unpopulated, meaning an all-female race did not survive.



Items

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Link with most of the items and equipment he acquires in The Legend of Zelda.

In The Legend of Zelda series of video games, the protagonist Link uses a variety of weapons and items during his quests. These often recur between games, though some are exclusive to a small number of games in the series. Objects may have different appearances across games, but usually have the same purpose in the gameplay. Items and weapons found in a dungeon are typically essential to clearing that dungeon and defeating that dungeon's boss. There are also some items Link never gets to possess (but play an important role in the game), or that he doesn't obtain until the end sequence. Template:TOClimit

SwordsEdit

Link's primary weapon is a sword. Games usually begin with Link possessing or acquiring a weak sword, but more powerful swords may be obtained as the game progresses.

Biggoron's SwordEdit

File:CIMG1346.JPG
Link Receiving the Biggoron's Sword in Ocarina of Time

In Ocarina of Time, the Biggoron's Sword is a weapon rewarded from the immense Goron smith Biggoron after the completion of an optional trading sequence in the form of a side quest. The sword resembles a German Zweihänder, and is identical to the Giant's Knife, another optional weapon in the same game; the Giant's Knife breaks after several uses, while the Biggoron's Sword is indestructible. It is twice as strong as the Master Sword (making it the strongest weapon in the game) and requires two hands to hold; while equipped, Link cannot use a shield. In the final fight with Ganon at the end of the game, the Biggoron's Sword cannot deal the finishing blow. Only the Master Sword can defeat Ganon, likely because of its magical abilities.

The Biggoron's Sword has a cameo in Soul Calibur II, and is used as a very long one-handed sword that Link partners with the usual Hylian Shield.

A similar sword, called the Great Fairy's Sword, appears in Majora's Mask. It has the same use as the Biggoron's Sword (twice as strong as the Gilded Sword, also needs both hands to use), but is green/purple in color and is a C-button item. Link receives this from the Stone Tower Temple Great Fairy if he can retrieve all fifteen Stray Fairies inside that temple. This sword also has a cameo in Soul Calibur II as Link's best weapon, with increased attack plus the effect of healing with every swing.

Four SwordEdit

The Four Sword is able to banish evil like the Master Sword, but can also split its wielder into four clones, each representing one of the four elements. Like the Master Sword, it has a secondary function — to serve as a prison for Vaati and Ganon.

Originally, the Four Sword was the Picori Blade, a magical sword given to the Hero of Hyrule by the Minish. This blade was used to imprison all known monsters in the Bound Chest, and was broken when Vaati opened the chest while looking for the Light Force. It was later forged by Melari into the White Sword, and finally became the Four Sword when it was infused with the crystalline essences of the four elements.

Link uses the Four Sword to defeat Vaati, who is seemingly killed. However, according to Four Swords, he was imprisoned inside the sword, and the sword was placed inside the Four Sword Sanctuary. In Four Swords, Vaati escapes the Four Sword. However, Link, or rather, the four Links (each wearing a different-colored tunic to distinguish them from one another), are able to track him down and re-imprison him in the sword. In Four Swords Adventures, Ganon uses the Dark Mirror to create Shadow Link, who tricks Link into withdrawing the sword and releasing Vaati. This time, however, Vaati is killed, and instead, Ganon is sealed within the sword. The Four Sword appears one last time in the re-release of A Link to the Past (which has Four Swords as part of the release), in the optional Four Sword Palace. It is implied in this game that Ganon broke out of the sword, shattering it, and took over the Pyramid of Power and the Triforce and thus the Golden Land from there. When Link collects the fragments, he is challenged by four Dark Links.

The Minish Cap version of the sword had a red jewel in the center of the hilt, while later versions instead had a marking resembling Vaati's eye. This may be due to Vaati's influence on the sword, and the reason why the Four Sword's clone power is automatic instead of a controlled ability in the other games.

Kokiri SwordEdit

The Kokiri Sword is the first sword Link receives in Ocarina of Time. It is a prized possession of the Kokiri. Once Link finds and claims the Master Sword, the Kokiri Sword is unavailable to him as an adult. It is listed as the initial sword in Majora's Mask but looks very different from its Ocarina of Time incarnation. It can be reforged into the Razor Sword and Gilded Sword.

Magical SwordEdit

The Magical Sword is the most powerful sword Link receives in the original The Legend of Zelda. In the game, the Magical Sword is twice as strong as the White Sword and four times stronger than the regular Sword. According to the instruction manual to The Adventure of Link, Link carries an otherwise unnamed "Magical Sword" in the sequel, which may be this sword. The official English Zelda website claims that the Magical Sword is the Master Sword. This may cause some confusion because the Master Sword originally had a red hilt,[1] despite the several aesthetic differences.

The Magical Sword also makes an appearance as a weapon for Link in Soul Calibur II (with a matching Magical Shield), but with a different design. In this game, it is a separate weapon from the Master Sword and deals damage even if the target is guarding or blocking.

Master SwordEdit

Main page: Master Sword

Wooden SwordEdit

An antique bokken, a traditional Japanese wooden sword. The bokken is considered a potential inspiration for the wooden sword in Zelda games.

The Wooden Sword is Link's starting weapon in many Zelda titles, particularly the 2D iterations. It is composed of wood, and it is usually the weakest melee weapon that Link can obtain. The wooden sword often allows Link to perform a signature Spin Attack, but in some incarnations it cannot fire magical beams or smash pots. A sword with a brown blade is also the initial weapon in the original Legend of Zelda. It is identified as a normal "Sword", but is of a brown wood-like color. Link acquires a wooden sword very early on in Twilight Princess, but lends it to Talo shortly before Talo and the other children are kidnapped. The sword is later found snapped in two. In Twilight Princess, the wooden sword's appearance closely resembles a bokken, strengthening the implication that it was originally intended as a practice sword.

Projectile weapons and toolsEdit

BoomerangEdit

The Boomerang (ブーメラン, Būmeran) is common in the Zelda series. It can be used as a weak projectile weapon against certain enemies, but is mostly used either to retrieve certain distant items or to stun some enemies. In The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess, the Boomerang can target and strike multiple enemies with each throw. In some games, an upgrade called the Magical Boomerang is available, which increases the range and/or the ability to control the Boomerang's flightpath after being thrown. In Phantom Hourglass, the player can use the Nintendo DS' touch screen to draw a path for the Boomerang, giving a greater degree of control than before. In Twilight Princess, the Boomerang is called the Gale Boomerang, which houses the "Fairy of Winds", and creates a gust of wind around itself whenever it is thrown, enabling it to move items and enemies and put out fires.

In Soul Calibur II and the Super Smash Bros. series, Link can use the Boomerang as a special move.

Bow and ArrowEdit

File:Hero'sBow.jpg
The Hero's Bow in Twilight Princess.

The bow and arrow is a staple weapon of the Zelda series that Link uses to fight enemies or trigger switches from a distance. It is similar in nature to the Slingshot, although usually more powerful. It uses a depleting source of ammunition, the maximum capacity of which can be increased in some of the games. In the original The Legend of Zelda, the capacity problem is solved by making Link pay one Rupee for every arrow he fires, thus limiting his quiver to the size of his wallet.

2D Zelda games usually feature standard, nameless bows which only shoot in the four cardinal directions on the screen. In these games there are usually upgrades to the standard arrow, such as the Silver Arrow or Light Arrow. In Four Swords Adventures and The Minish Cap, the bow can be upgraded, allowing for quicker charging and shooting.

Bows and Arrows in the 3D Zelda games are more interactive tools than their 2D counterparts. When manually aiming a shot, the player's perspective changes to Link's point of view, and can be fired in almost any direction. In Ocarina of Time, the bow is named the Fairy Bow and is obtained by Link as an adult to be used in place of his childhood projectile weapon, the Fairy Slingshot. A bow known as the Hero's Bow has appeared in Majora's Mask, The Wind Waker, and Twilight Princess. In Majora's Mask, the bow is small enough that it can be used by a child while still being a powerful weapon, and in Twilight Princess, it is hinted that the Hero's Bow is the same as used by a hero of a prior Zelda game, although it is considerably larger than the bow in any other 3D Zelda games.

The Bow in most 3D Zelda games can use special elemental arrows along with the standard arrow for more powerful attacks and for puzzle-solving. Firing these types of elemental arrows expends an amount of "magic power", or magic points, and there usually is a delay between consecutive shots.

In Twilight Princess, the telescope-like Hawkeye can be comined with the bow to create a sniper's weapon, and Bombs can be combined with arrows to make Bomb Arrows, which are used to blow up distant targets. The latter feature is also an Easter egg in Link's Awakening, but is not needed to complete the game.

Link uses a bow and arrow in Soul Calibur II as a special move. The move has a variation that allows it to pierce enemy defenses. The Bow and Arrow is also Link's standard special move in Super Smash Bros. Melee and Super Smash Bros. Brawl.

Fire ArrowsEdit

The heads of Fire Arrows are set aflame, burning targets upon contact or melting ice. It is possible to create a makeshift Fire Arrow without using magic power by shooting a normal arrow through an existing flame. In Super Smash Bros. Melee, Young Link uses Fire Arrows as his B-Button attack.

Ice ArrowsEdit

Ice Arrows can render their target temporarily frozen and, in Majora's Mask, create ice platforms in water or encase enemies in blocks of ice on which Link can stand. They are sometimes also necessary to extinguish flames or freeze water streams. However, in Ocarina of Time, the Ice Arrows have little practical use besides attacking enemies. In The Wind Waker, Link can freeze the enemy and then break them with the Skull Hammer, Fire Arrows or by picking the frozen enemy up and throwing it. Also in The Wind Waker, Ice Arrows can be used to create temporary platforms on magma.

Light ArrowsEdit

First appearing in Ocarina of Time, the Light Arrows of legend can pierce pure evil and are possessed by few. They are useful and required to defeat Ganondorf on several occasions. The Light Arrows are similar in this respect to the Silver Arrows from previous Zelda games, but, unlike the Silver Arrows, the Light Arrows are used to penetrate Ganon's defenses, rather than to strike the killing blow. Link must also expend more magic than when firing other types of magic arrows, due to their power. The Light Arrows are typically the most damaging projectile weapon in any Zelda title in which they appear, especially in The Wind Waker, wherein they kill any enemy with one shot, no matter how strong they are. In Majora's Mask, they can also be used to affect light-sensitive objects. In The Wind Waker, Link gives the Light Arrows to Princess Zelda in the final fight against Ganon, so that she can bounce them off of Link's Mirror Shield to stun him, allowing Link to attack. Light Arrows are only used once in Twilight Princess, in the final battle, once again wielded by Princess Zelda. In this story, the Light Arrows are created by the Light Spirits whom Link tracks down and restores light to early on in the game to dispel the darkness that is beginning to cover Hyrule.

Light Arrows are also featured in The Minish Cap as an optional arrow upgrade, though they serve a somewhat different function.

Silver ArrowsEdit

The Silver Arrows are the only available means to defeat Ganon in The Legend of Zelda and A Link to the Past. In The Legend of Zelda, they are one of the two special items found in the final labyrinth. In A Link to the Past, they are a gift from the Great Fairy in the Dark World. The Silver Arrows can instantly destroy most enemies Link encounters, including bosses such as Helmasaur King.

SlingshotEdit

The Slingshot is Link's alternative weapon to the Bow and Arrow in many games. Usually, he gets the Slingshot first and later gets the more powerful Bow which can shoot the different kinds of arrows described above. It uses rocks and seeds as ammunition and stores them similarly to arrows in his inventory. In Ocarina of Time, the Fairy Slingshot serves as Young Link's projectile weapon (Adult Link uses the Fairy Bow). In Oracle of Seasons, it fires various Magical Seeds whose effects range from igniting enemies to creating whirlwinds; in Oracle of Ages it was replaced with the "Seed Shooter", a gun-like weapon which fired the aforementioned magical seeds with the added effect that the seeds could rebound if shot against walls. In Four Swords Adventures (and also in Oracle of Seasons), upgrades are also available for the slingshot. The level 2 version (dubbed the "Hyper Slingshot" in Seasons) was capable of charging up and releasing three rocks at the same time in three different directions. In Twilight Princess, Link must acquire a slingshot in order to proceed early in the game, but it has very slight offensive capability, a shorter range than is found in previous games, and is rendered virtually useless after he receives the Hero's Bow. The Slingshot does not appear in Phantom Hourglass, however, the mail man asks Link not to hit him by using one, which is a reference to Animal Crossing: Wild World.

HookshotEdit

The Hookshot is a form of grappling hook, except in the style of a gun rather than a rope.

First appearing in A Link to the Past, the Hookshot can pull Link across large distances by hooking onto certain surfaces, or pull objects across to him, depending on the relative weight of the two. It can also be used as a weapon to kill or stun far-off enemies, or as a simple projectile to activate switches.

In The Wind Waker, Link also obtains a normal Grappling Hook that wraps around certain outcroppings, giving him the ability to swing from them, and climb up and down the rope. This returns in Phantom Hourglass, albeit with the effects of the Hookshot, in addition to the rope being used to slingshot across gaps. The original Hookshot still appears in The Wind Waker as one of the final items in the game.

In Twilight Princess, a weapon called the Clawshot is used, where, instead of a hook, a device similar to the claw in a claw game is attached, enabling Link to latch onto different types of ceiling and wall surfaces. It also allows Link to hang from a ceiling surface and raise or lower himself from that point, and it can be used in conjunction with the Iron Boots where extra weight is required. Another Clawshot is found later in the game and the two are used in tandem to create the Double Clawshots, enabling movement without touching the ground by firing one while clinging to a surface with the other.

In Oracle of Ages a device similar to the Hookshot/Clawshot is found, this time known as the Switch Hook. Rather than pulling you towards things or vice-versa, the Switch Hook allows you to switch places with them instead, making for some very novel and creative puzzles. The Switch Hook is later upgraded to the Long Hook for use over longer distances.

In Phantom Hourglass it is used to attach to pegs and get Link through gaps. It can also be used to form a sort of slingshot by attaching it to two pegs.

Link uses the Hookshot in the Super Smash Bros. series to grapple his opponents, but it can also be used to reach the edge of a stage as a last-ditch recovery move; the Clawshot replaces the Hookshot in Link's Super Smash Bros. Brawl arsenal.

ShieldsEdit

Shields assist Link in blocking attacks and reflecting projectiles. In some cases, Link's shield is important in solving puzzles. Shields, like weapons, come in many different variations. Link usually starts with a very basic wooden shield and then obtains at least one metal shield upgrade during the game. He also sometimes acquires a special shield known as the Mirror Shield. Link usually carries the shield on his back when he is not using it.

Wooden ShieldEdit

The Wooden Shield is a simple defensive item used in the beginning of some of Link's adventures. Although it takes on a variety of forms, each one is essentially an item used to deflect arrows and small projectiles. Most variations of this shield are vulnerable to fire, and so will require a new one to be purchased or found if it is burned. For this reason, the Wooden Shield is usually abandoned after a more durable upgrade is acquired.

Hero's ShieldEdit

The Hero's Shield is a smaller metal shield similar to the Hylian Shield of Ocarina of Time, but with a varied design, an owl motif replacing what is widely believed to be a phoenix, a variant of which is found on most of the standard shields since A Link to the Past. Link already owns this shield at the outset of Majora's Mask. It is identical to the Hylian Shield, and its smaller size allows young Link to wield it with his sword.

A shield with the same name, but a different design, is seen in The Wind Waker, set on the wall of Link's home. The crest on the shield is similar to that of the shield in Majora's Mask, but the shield itself is of a different shape and design. It reappears as the Small Shield in Four Swords and The Minish Cap, as both games use the same art style as The Wind Waker.

Hylian ShieldEdit

The Hylian Shield (Hylia Shield in the Japanese version) is a large, adult-sized metal shield, bearing the crest of Hyrule's Royal Family—a large red bird above which sits the Triforce. In Ocarina of Time, it can be purchased at the Bazaar in Hyrule Castle Market, or found in a tomb in Kakariko Graveyard. It is able to deflect most projectiles back at enemies, and can block most mêlée attacks. Link can use the Hylian Shield as a child, but only by strapping it on his back and crouching for protection. In Twilight Princess, it must be bought either at Malo Mart in Kakariko Village, or at Hyrule Castle Town from a Goron selling swordsman supplies later in the game. The shield possesses two qualities that have made it somewhat famous: its ability to withstand fire-based attacks, and the fact that it is the shield of choice for Hylian Knights. This latter quality is particularly well advertised at the Bazaar in Ocarina of Time.

A similar shield known as the Iron Shield is available in Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons.

Mirror ShieldEdit

File:Mirrorshield.jpg
Link receives the Mirror Shield in Majora's Mask.

The Mirror Shield is a shield made of highly polished metal. It has slightly differing designs in each game, but its main purpose is the reflection of light or magic projectiles.

The shield first appears in A Link to the Past as an upgrade that allows Link to block (but not deflect) lasers. It also appears in Link's Awakening and reflects lasers and fire, but does not damage enemies. In Ocarina of Time, it is used to solve a few puzzles and defeat the boss of the Spirit Temple, Twinrova. It also commonly does not deflect certain types of projectiles, like those of Octoroks, shattering them instead. In Majora's Mask, the shield bears an image of a screaming face that is reflected when exposed to light. In Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, the Mirror Shield can be obtained through an optional side quest. The Mirror Shield is required in order to solve several puzzles in The Wind Waker; its design is similar to the Mirror Shield in Ocarina of Time, but with blue outlines and a different surface design. In The Minish Cap, when it is used to block a projectile, the shield reflects a damaging beam of light back at the enemy.

This shield is also available in Soul Calibur II where any normal damage (as in everything but being thrown) is dealt back to the attacker by a factor of one half, though the deflection may cause Link to lose his balance if attack is a strong one.

The crescent moon design of the Mirror Shield in Ocarina of Time was changed for the GameCube re-release. Other appearances of this design in the game (which resembles an Islamic symbol) were changed as well.

Clothing and jewelryEdit

TunicsEdit

A standard piece of equipment for Link in every Zelda game, the traditional green outfit is Link's default hero's clothing. Link's outfit has undergone color variations for many different reasons throughout the Zelda series. In addition to the original green, the first two traditional variations were red and blue. The colors are typically associated with specific clothing items, but their uses are numerous and varied, with little that remains constant between titles. The only generalization that can be made is that they often serve to protect Link from various harmful influences. Link sometimes sports some other garb at first, but the standard green tunic is always acquired a short way into the game. There have been many differently colored tunics, including green, red, blue, and purple.

Green TunicEdit

Known in Ocarina of Time as the Kokiri Tunic, or at other times simply as the Green Jerkin or the Hero's Clothes, the Green Tunic is Link's standard choice of clothing. The clothes do not have any particular use except to iconify the wearer as Hyrule's signature Hero. In Twilight Princess, Link wears a linen shirt, a chain mail shirt and pants underneath the tunic. Although some variation of the green tunic is worn in every game, upgrades are often available (and the color of each is different—see below), which either afford protection from certain elements or increase Link's defensive capabilities.

Special tunics and armorEdit

In Ocarina of Time, the Goron Tunic is a dark red tunic that allows Link to go into areas with extremely high ambient temperatures. Supposedly made from Dodongo hides and Bomb Flower fibers,[citation needed] it is used primarily in the Fire Temple and Death Mountain Crater areas. In the course of the game, Link can secure the Tunic from Goron Link in Goron City, or he can buy it from the shop for 200 rupees.

The Zora Tunic is a blue tunic that allows Link to breathe underwater, and is supposedly made of fish gills.[citation needed] In Ocarina of Time, it can be obtained by thawing out either King Zora, who will give Link a free tunic, or the entrance to the shop in Zora's Domain, where Link can purchase it for 300 rupees. It is needed most in the Water Temple. Both the Goron Tunic and the Zora Tunic are too big for Child Link to wear.

In The Wind Waker, Link may obtain Magic Armor. Its use is similar to the magic ability "Nayru's Love" from Ocarina of Time, and it is implied and believed that it actually is that item.[citation needed] At the cost of Magic points, Link will become invincible while wearing it (or while his magic lasts).

In Twilight Princess, both the Zora Armor and Magic Armor change Link's appearance dramatically, instead of just changing the color of his clothes. The Zora Armor is obtained from the Zora Queen Rutela after Link helps her son, Prince Ralis. The suit gives Link the appearance of a Zora, as it appears to be made of Zora scales. Furthermore, it allows Link to breathe and swim freely underwater, but at the cost of increasing the damage incurred from fire and ice attacks tenfold.

The Magic Armor is also an obtainable item in Twilight Princess. It can be bought at the Castle Town extension of Malo Mart. It covers Link in golden armor and a red tunic with various designs. It uses Rupees instead of magic (most likely because there is no magic meter included in the game). It drains several Rupees per second and also consumes a certain number of Rupees when Link is hit, the number of which varies depending on the severity of the hit. If Link runs out of Rupees while wearing the Magic Armor, the armor turns gray, loses invunerablility, and becomes heavy, reducing Link's speed of movement similar to the Iron Boots.

Other tunics, armor and clothingEdit

Link's clothing turns brown and red when he uses the Shield spell in The Adventure of Link, but the spell only grants him increased defense against enemy attacks.

In A Link to the Past, Link can obtain Blue Mail while treading the fifth dungeon in the Dark World, which turns his tunic blue and halves the damage received from enemies.

A more defensive red tunic can be acquired in A Link to the Past, known as Red Mail. This halves the damage that Link receives while wearing the Blue Mail, and allows him to take only one-quarter of the damage of his sundry green clothes. The Red Mail is obtained in Ganon's Tower.

In Link's Awakening DX, Link can undertake a side quest to obtain either a red or a blue tunic. The red tunic doubles Link's power, similar to a Piece of Power, and the blue tunic cuts the damage received by half, like the Guardian Acorn. Link can trade one tunic for the other by repeating the side quest, but cannot have both at once.

In Ocarina of Time, the player can use the Game Shark to unlock black, white and yellow tunics that did not make it into the final product. This possibly explains the white alternative tunic color in the original Super Smash Bros..

In Four Swords and Four Swords Adventures, the fourth Link wears a purple tunic, which has no special use except simply to differentiate among the four copies of Link.

In Twilight Princess, before Link acquires the Hero's Clothes, he wears a simple Ordon Ranch outfit (which also doubles as sumo attire, sans the top). All Ordonians wear similar clothing.

In The Wind Waker, Link starts off wearing a blue crawfish-print shirt, orange shorts and sandals, but soon changes into his traditional green garb. However, during the second quest he wears his original outfit throughout the entire game.

In The Minish Cap, during the end of the game, Link can acquire special bottle-able Charms from the Oracles Din, Nayru, and Farore in Hyrule Town. Din's Charm turns Link's tunic Red and doubles his sword power for a short period of time, like a Piece of Power in Link's Awakening or the Red Ring from Oracle of Seasons. Nayru's Charm turns Link's tunic Blue and doubles his defenses for a short period of time, like a Guardian Acorn in Link's Awakening or the Blue Ring from Oracle of Ages. Farore's Charm turns Link's tunic Purple (despite the charm's green color), and increases both his sword power and his defenses by a small amount for a short period of time, like the Green Ring in the both Oracle games.

HatsEdit

Hats are very rarely true items, as only one hat is a usable item, while the other three are storyline artifacts that are never truly "obtained". It is thought by some that the normal hat is where Link stores all of his items.

The Gnat Hat is a red cap that allows Link to shrink down to gnat-sized proportions. It bears a strong resemblance to the Wishing Cap that plays an important part in the plot of The Minish Cap.

Ezlo is a Minish who was transformed into a hat against his will by his apprentice, Vaati. As a hat, he has the same function as the Gnat Hat, but can only shrink Link at certain portals, instead of at will. Ezlo is also the creator of the Wishing Cap, which was used by Vaati to become an evil sorcerer, and later by Zelda to repair the damage Vaati inflicts on Hyrule during the events of The Minish Cap. Link starts off without his hat in this game, and it's revealed he seems to wear his hair in a small ponytail.

FootwearEdit

In all Zelda installments, Link's standard Boots are generic and of little significance. As the list of Zelda games has grown, Link has had a chance to wear several pairs of special boots and flippers. In Ocarina of Time, the Kokiri Boots are Link's standard boots, have no special powers, and the only ones that he can wear as a child.

Winged BootsEdit

The first magical boots that appear as an item are the Winged Boots in The Adventure of Link. These allow Link to walk over certain sections of water to reach the Palace on the Sea, among other things.

Iron BootsEdit

The Iron Boots are heavy, ironclad boots that allow Link to sink quickly in water, among other weight-related uses, such as depressing switches. The Iron Boots are an item that can be equipped by Link in Ocarina of Time. They also appear in The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess. In Twilight Princess, they can be used on magnetized surfaces to walk along walls and ceilings, and, unlike in Ocarina of Time and The Wind Waker, Link cannot backflip while wearing the boots, rather performing a small hop backward. Interestingly, Link's sword, shield, bow and other metal based items are entirely unaffected by the magnetic field. Also, Link is only affected by their weight when he wears them on his feet, and not by simply carrying them on his person.

File:Laboots.jpg
Pegasus Boots, as depicted in artwork from The Legend of Zelda.

Pegasus BootsEdit

The Pegasus Boots, or Pegasus Shoes, named after the mythological Pegasus, allow Link to sprint at high speeds. Link first obtains them in A Link to the Past. In Four Swords Adventures, Level 2 Pegasus Boots allow Link to run across holes in the ground, a function similar to that of the Hover Boots. In Battle Mode of Phantom Hourglass Pegasus Boots make Link faster for a period of time

Hover BootsEdit

The Hover Boots allow Link to float for a few seconds after running off of a surface, effectively lengthening his jump. When used, Hover Boots greatly reduce traction when walking, making Link walk as if walking on ice, but also allow him to walk over quicksand with no negative effects, and the reduced traction has the side effect of increasing his speed when rolling repeatedly.

Flippers/Zora's FlippersEdit

Flippers or Zora's Flippers are found only in the 2D games. They allow Link to swim and prevent him from drowning. Sometimes they are not strong enough for really deep water, in which case Link needs to find something more effective for treading the depths. Flippers are also an inseparable part of the Zora Armor in Twilight Princess.

CapesEdit

Roc's Cape and Roc's FeatherEdit

The Roc is a mythological bird.

The Roc's Feather allows Link to jump. Its upgrade is called the Roc's Cape. This is similar to Super Mario World, in which acquiring a feather gives Mario or Luigi a cape, enabling them to fly. In the Oracle games, it is actually a blue feather.

The Roc's Cape allows Link to jump in the 2D games. It allows maneuverability in the air: when using it while jumping, Link will glide a bit farther. The Roc's Cape is technically an upgrade of the Roc's Feather, which only allows Link to jump.

Magic CapeEdit

The Magic Cape allows Link to become invisible and pass over spikes and other obstacles. It is a magic power consuming item.

Rings, bracelets and glovesEdit

In almost every Zelda game, Link acquires at least once one of these items, which either allows him to lift heavy objects or increases his defensive capabilities.

Blue and Red RingsEdit

In The Legend of Zelda, Link's tunic color changes to blue if he acquires the Blue Ring, which he can purchase for 250 Rupees. This tunic halves the damage Link takes while wearing the regular green tunic. Link can also obtain a Red Ring, which is located in Death Mountain and allows Link to take one-quarter of the damage he receives while wearing his signature green garb in a new red colored garb. The Blue and Red Rings also appear in Four Swords Adventures, where once again, the color of Link's tunic changes to correspond to the color of the ring. The Blue and Red Rings are replaced with the Blue Mail and Red Mail in the The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.

Rings also feature in the Oracle games, offering various power-ups, such as the ability to turn into a monster or to enhance certain abilities. The Blue Ring, unique to Ages, specifically halves the damage Link takes, similar to the Blue Tunic in The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX and both versions of the game's Guardian Acorn, and thus acts identical to the Blue Mail from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and the original Blue Ring. The Red Ring, unique to to Seasons on the other hand, doubles Link's sword power, similar to the Red Tunic in Link's Awakening DX and both versions of the game's Piece of Power, and not like the original Red Ring or the Red Mail. There is also a Green Ring, occurring in both games, raises Link's sword power and defenses by an amount not quite as much as the other two rings. These rings are equatable to the Charms from The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap, which references the Oracle game in several other ways.

Items for pushing and liftingEdit

The Power Bracelet (or Power Bracelets) allow Link to pick up a myriad of things, including Dodongos, boulders, stones, pots, statues, sarcophagi and bushes, among other things. A variation of this, the Power Gloves, can be found in Oracle of Ages, which Link can use to lift objects too heavy for lifting with the Power Bracelet. In Ocarina of Time, Link is granted the Goron's Bracelet by Darunia. This item enables Link to pick up Bomb Flowers. Link later obtains the Silver Gauntlets and the more powerful Gold Gauntlets, both of which allow him to push and pick up (and throw!) heavy objects. In The Minish Cap, Link will find the Power Bracelets, which allow him to move normal sized objects while at his shrunken minish size, and the Grip Ring, which enables him to climb certain walls.

Magical crystals and medallionsEdit

In A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time, Link can obtain magical charms which are used to cast spells, each of which has a considerable magic power cost. In A Link to the Past, these charms are medallions, their spells target the entire screen, affecting most non-boss monsters: Bombos, which incinerates foes, Ether, which freezes them, and Quake, which transforms monsters into a weaker form like Magic Powder. The Ether and Quake are also needed to open the entrance to specific dungeons. In The Ocarina of Time, these charms are crystals obtained from Great Faries, Din's Fire is used to perform an area fire attack, Farore's Wind is used for teleportation within dungeons, and Nayru's Love, which provides invulneribility while rapidly draining magic power.

ExplosivesEdit

BombsEdit

File:ZeldaBomb.png
A bomb from Twilight Princess.

One of the most commonly used items throughout the Zelda series is Bombs. They are typically round in shape and are self-igniting. Link can use them to damage enemies, bust through walls and barriers and solve puzzles. If Link uses bombs at sea in The Wind Waker, they are shot out of a cannon that is a function of the King of Red Lions (Link's boat). In Twilight Princess, Link can purchase Water Bombs, which are identical in functionality to normal bombs except that they can be detonated underwater. They are used in solving some side-quest puzzles and in the Lakebed Temple. An upgrade of Bombs called Remote Bombs can be obtained in The Minish Cap by fusing Kinstones, which enable bombs to be detonated at will, instead of after a set period of time.

Bomb FlowersEdit

Bomb Flowers appear in Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, Oracle of Ages, Oracle of Seasons, The Wind Waker, and Phantom Hourglass as a plant that can be found and picked by Link. In Ocarina of Time, the Gorons explain that they are a carefully cultivated crop. The bombs explode shortly after being picked, and regrow soon afterwards. These features lead to it functioning as a limited-capability Bomb. In Oracle of Ages and Oracle of Seasons, Bomb Flowers are part of trading sequences, and cannot actually be used during game-play. In Twilight Princess, the spider-like Bomblings serve the same purpose as bomb flowers in the wild and can later be purchsed for use at will.

BombchuEdit

A Bombchu is a bomb in the shape of a mouse ("Chu" in Japanese). They are mechanical devices which run along floors and walls before exploding. They first appear as items in Ocarina of Time, and return in Majora's Mask. In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Bombchus can home in on nearby monsters, and are obtained through password sidequests. In Phantom Hourglass, the player is able to use the stylus to draw out a detailed path of their choosing for the Bombchu.

They have also appeared as enemies in Majora's Mask and The Wind Waker - in Majora's Mask, they are frenzied-looking rat-monsters with explosive tails, while in The Wind Waker they are simply mice that hold bombs.

Super Bombs and Powder KegsEdit

In A Link to the Past Link can purchase a powerful bomb late in the game, called a Super Bomb, which he essentially drags around and will detonate if separated from him. It can be used as a regular bomb, but the only thing for which it is actually needed is to open a room in the Pyramid of Power where Link can upgrade his sword and arrows.

In Majora's Mask, Link can purchase massive Powder Kegs to destroy obstacles that will withstand the power of regular bombs. Due to their size and weight, Link can only carry one powder keg at a time and can only use them while in Goron form.

Rune BombsEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild the Sheikah slate can generate bombs from nothing, in either spherical or cubic forms.

Musical instrumentsEdit

Main page: Musical instruments from The Legend of Zelda series

Various musical instruments are used throughout the Zelda series. Tunes played on these items may have a variety of effects, including damaging enemies, transporting Link, or revealing secrets.

OcarinaEdit

Found in Link's Awakening, and later much more prominently in games like The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time.

Wind WakerEdit

A conductors baton capable of directing the wind itself central to The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker.

Canes and rodsEdit

Throughout the Zelda series, canes and rods are occasionally obtained and serve a variety of functions.

The Cane of Byrna, Cane of Somaria, and Cane of Pacci are identical in appearance aside from their color, which would seem to suggest they are of similar origin. The Cane of Byrna and Cane of Somaria debut in A Link to the Past, and each consumes magic power when used. The Cane of Byrna is blue and creates a ring of invincibility that circles Link. It cameos as a weapon in Soul Calibur II. The Cane of Somaria is red and creates a block which Link can carry and throw around, but unlike regular blocks, Link cannot pull himself to these using the Hookshot. If Link uses the Cane of Somaria a second time (while in the same room in which he creates a block), the block explodes, sending magic shooting in each of the cardinal directions. The Cane of Somaria also appears in Oracle of Ages, although it does not require magic to use. In The Minish Cap, Link finds the yellow Cane of Pacci, the primary use of which is to flip objects over.

The Ice Rod and Fire Rod appear in A Link to the Past. They shoot elemental blasts ice and fire, respectively, and are used in puzzle solving and to defeat or incapacitate certain enemies. They can also freeze and burn things. The Fire Rod also appears in Four Swords Adventures, where it serves the same purpose.

The Magic Rod appears in Link's Awakening, and produces an effect similar to that of the Fire Rod in A Link to the Past, as it is also able to light torches.

The Rod of Seasons appears in Oracle of Seasons, and can alter the season of the surrounding area if Link stands on a tree stump and swings it. Once Link finds the spirit of each season, he receives the power to change the current season to each respective season.

The Dominion Rod (コピーロッド Copy Rod) appears in Twilight Princess. It is a magical rod that can breathe life into statues, causing them to follow Link around until he relinquishes control. One type of statue—a knight wielding a giant hammer—can attack on Link's command, breaking gates that bar his way. These statues become a key element for puzzle-solving in the Temple of Time, and they also aid Link in the boss battle against Armogohma. Once Link leaves the Temple of Time, however, the Dominion Rod loses its power and turns the color of rust. It is later restored shortly after Shad reads an inscription from the Ancient Sky Book.

Other toolsEdit

Candle, Lamp and LanternEdit

In The Legend of Zelda, the Blue Candle and Red Candle are used to light dark places and burn bushes/enemies. The Blue Candle can only be used once per room/area (Link has to exit and reenter the room/area to use the Blue candle a second time). The Red Candle, on the other hand, can be used perpetually.. A generic candle appears in The Adventure of Link, but is only for lighting dark areas. In A Link to the Past, the Magic Lamp or Lantern replaces the Candle. It is the first item Link can acquire in this game and uses magic power in the form of a Magic Meter that Link automatically gains when he acquires the Lantern. It gives a small amount of light in dark areas, and also lights torches, a function taken over by other items in games that feature no lantern. A Lantern known as the Flame Lantern appears in The Minish Cap. In addition to the aforementioned functions, the Flame Lantern can also melt ice. A regular Lantern reappears in Four Swords Adventures as the only item that can't be upgraded by a Great Fairy. Link is given a Lantern in Twilight Princess; its purpose is added to again, as it is used to light up darkened areas, set things aflame and drive away dangerous fog. Instead of magic, this Lantern uses Lantern Oil, and Link can store additional oil in bottles. Yellow Chu Jelly can also double as Lantern Oil if Link scoops it up with a bottle.

Fishing RodEdit

The Fishing Rod (sometimes called the Fishing Pole) is a tool which enables Link to fish. The Fishing Rod first appeared in Link's Awakening, where Link participated in a fishing mini-game. Link did not actually obtain the Fishing Rod, but was merely lent it by a fisherman. Link can also rent a Fishing Rod in Ocarina of Time and can obtain one of his own in Twilight Princess, along with the Fish Log, which keeps track of the fish Link has caught. In addition, like bottles from the Ocarina of Time, they can be used to distract Ganondorf to free him up for a few sword attacks. In Phantom Hourglass, Link can control a Fishing Pole using the stylus and take part in a sidequest for a new Heart Container

ShovelEdit

The Shovel first appears in A Link to the Past as an item that allows Link to dig up soft ground, sometimes revealing an item or object. In Twilight Princess, Link's wolf form can dig without aid. In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, Dampé will dig on command for Link. In The Wind Waker, giant pigs will dig if fed bait, usually uncovering Rupees (and one well-hidden Piece of Heart). In Four Swords Adventures, the level 2 shovel will alert the player to the presence of treasure by way of a beep that increases in intensity/frequency the closer Link gets to the buried item. In The Minish Cap, the Mole Mitts serve a similar purpose. If they are used while standing over grass, Rupees and other items can be found in the ground.

HammersEdit

Hammers are typically powerful, somewhat cartoon-sized weapons used primarily to destroy large rocks, inflict large amounts of damage, or smash things into the ground (such as certain types of switches). In the 3D games, hammers are usually too big for Link to hold with just one hand, preventing him from using his shield when holding it. The first hammer in the series appears in The Adventure of Link, where it allows Link to destroy boulders in his path on the overworld. In A Link to the Past, it is called the Magical Hammer and is used to pound obstacles, and can also be used as an offensive weapon. In Ocarina of Time, the hammer is the Megaton Hammer, and largely has the same function, but can send out a shockwave that damages or flips some ground borne enemies when it strikes the ground. The hammer is known as the Skull Hammer in The Wind Waker, where it can create enemy-stunning shockwaves when it strikes the ground, similar to the megaton hammer, but stuns a wider variety of enemies. In Four Swords Adventures, Link can slam the hammer to make the ground shake and reveal underground items. There is no hammer in Twilight Princess, but the Ball and Chain has a similar role. The Ball and Chain is an oversized morning star or flail and can be swung about Link's head as a damaging form of protection, and functions as a form of shield when carried. In Phantom Hourglass, a Magic Hammer is obtained in the Pyramid Temple that can strike from a distance.

Deku NutsEdit

Deku Nuts are large seeds harvested from the Great Deku Tree and obtained from certain enemies when defeated. They explode with an overpowering flash, which can blind and stun some enemies. In Ocarina of Time, Sheik and Impa use them to blind Link, allowing them to disappear. They appear as items in Super Smash Bros. Brawl.[citation needed]

HawkeyeEdit

The Hawkeye is a hawk-head shaped mask that is used in conjunction with the Hero's Bow in Twilight Princess. It works as a scope, enabling Link to pick off enemies from long range. It is bought from Malo Mart at a price of 100 rupees.

ContainersEdit

Among the items that can be obtained by Link are Containers that allow him to carry other things, such as projectiles, small objects, and even life-restoring fairies.

BottlesEdit

Bottles are an essential part to many of Link's quests. These containers are used and often required to carry various things.

Due to their usefulness, they are highly sought after. In most games in which they are featured, Link can obtain up to four bottles. The only exceptions thus far is Majora's Mask, in which there are six, and Phantom Hourglass, in which Link always has two. In Ocarina of Time, bottles are said to be made of crystal glass. Amusingly, a bottle can be used to knock back Ganondorf's magic spells in Ocarina of Time, Phantom Ganon's attacks in The Wind Waker and Ocarina of Time, and Ganon's Puppet Zelda's attacks in Twilight Princess. This is perhaps a throwback to A Link to the Past in which Link could use the Bug-Catching Net to deflect Agahnim's magic.

Recurring bottle items include green potions, which fully restore magic points, red potions, which fully restore hearts, blue potions, which fully restore both, fairies, which restore a number of hearts and can revive Link, and milk, which restores a small number of hearts, but can be used twice, making it more useful early on, before a large number of heart containers are obtained.

WalletEdit

In most Zelda games, Link uses a Wallet to contain his Rupees. Certain weapons, items, and equipment exceed Link's Rupee-carrying capacity in price, necessitating a Wallet upgrade. In these games, the Wallet can be upgraded through side quests. The highest wallet capacity so far in Zelda history is in Phantom Hourglass, in which Link can carry up to 9,999 Rupees without needing to obtain a wallet at any point in the game; the lowest capacity is in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, where Link can only hold up to 99 Rupees before obtaining upgrades.

Bomb BagsEdit

In several games, Link can obtain one or more Bomb Bags to carry various explosive devices. They are made from leather and Dodongo stomachs, among other materials, and vary in their capacities of the number and type of bombs that they can carry. See above for more information.

QuiverEdit

Link holds arrows for his bow in the Quiver. In most games, a larger Quiver can be obtained.

Dungeon itemsEdit

The following items are found only in dungeons and generally are used only in the dungeons in which they are found in the order in which they are usually obtained:

Dungeon MapEdit

The Dungeon Map shows Link the entire dungeon in which it was found. It also shows which rooms he has already visited, and where he currently is.

CompassEdit

In dungeons, the Compass allows Link to locate chests (which are sometimes invisible until Link opens them) and the dungeon's boss. In most games, the compass can also be used to tell which direction Link is facing, and from which entrance Link entered the room. In Link's Awakening, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages, the Compass makes a sound when Link enters a room containing a key.

Small KeyEdit

Small Keys are usually found throughout dungeons, not necessarily before or after the map, compass, or Big Key. Each Small Key can open only one door. In The Legend of Zelda, not all keys found in a dungeon are necessary to complete it. This is true of a lot of games in the series, but in the original, unused keys can be used in other dungeons, and extra keys can be bought at shops. They can also be used that way in The Adventure of Link. However, Link cannot buy extra keys in that game, sometimes making it impossible to complete until he obtains Fairy Magic (in fairy form, Link can fly through a door's keyhole) or the Master Key. In all subsequent Zelda games, Small Keys can only be used in the dungeon in which they are found, and frequently, all keys must be found to complete each dungeon. The Master Key appears only in the NES Zelda games, it functions as a reusable Small Key.

Big Key and Boss KeyEdit

The Big Key originated in A Link to the Past, where it unlocks specific doors with large keyholes and large treasure boxes holding one-of-a-kind items. It returns in most later games in the series, but only unlocks the door to the boss lair. In some games, it is referred to as the Boss Key; in Link's Awakening, it is referred to as the Nightmare Key; and still, in Twilight Princess, the key to the boss's room in Snowpeak Ruins is called the Bedroom Key. In 3D games, Big Keys are usually found in ornately decorated Treasure Chests. In Phantom Hourglass it is impossible to use any weapons whilst holding the Big Key. It is carried above Link's head (slightly imparing his movement) and can be dropped or thrown if there is a need for combat.

MiscellaneousEdit

Visibility itemsEdit

The Cross in The Adventure of Link is used to see the normally invisible purple Moas. Like the Magnifying Glass, the Cross is always active and does not consume magic power.

The Magnifying Glass in Link's Awakening is obtained through a trading side-quest. It allows Link to see creatures and read books that he could not before.

In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, the Lens of Truth is used to see invisible creatures and objects and see through illusionary walls. It can be switched on and off, and, while active, slowly drains magic power.

The Hawkeye is a hawk-head shaped mask in Twilight Princess. It works as a scope, enabling Link to pick off enemies from long range. It can be used in conjunction with the Hero's Bow to create an effect similar to a sniper. It is bought from Malo Mart at a price of 100 rupees.


MasksEdit

There are a number of masks in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. Some serve no to little purpose, while others can change Link's shape, speed and size. Masks are a very important part of Majora's Mask.

RupeesEdit

Heart ContainerEdit

File:HeartcontainerOOTboss.jpg
Link receives a Heart Container in Ocarina of Time.

Heart Containers are obtainable items which increase Link's maximum health meter. While it is possible to lose health (measured by an on-screen display of heart images, each of which are usually divided into quarters), it is not possible to lose a Heart Container (i.e. the maximum health) once it has been earned. The only exception is in the second quest of The Legend of Zelda, where it is possible to give up a Heart Container in order to proceed through certain dungeons.

Heart Containers can be obtained in one of two ways:

  • As full Heart Containers (generally after beating a boss) which gives Link additional HP by adding one heart to his life meter.
  • As smaller containers, found at certain locations in the game or as a reward for completing a minigame or side quest. The games refer to these items as Pieces of Heart.

In The Legend of Zelda, The Adventure of Link and Phantom Hourglass, only full Heart Containers exist. Pieces of Heart were introduced in A Link to the Past.

Most Zelda games have a limit of twenty Heart Containers, but require the player (as Link) to complete all the tasks required to get all possible Heart Containers and Pieces of Heart.

Heart Containers also appear in the Super Smash Bros. series as healing items. In Super Smash Bros. a player using a Heart Container will shed all of their damage. In all modes of Super Smash Bros. Melee except "All-Star", the container will drop the user's current damage percentage by 100%. They also appear in a few other games including UPIXO In Action: Mission in Snowdriftland and Star Tropics, serving the same purpose that they do in Zelda games.

Piece of HeartEdit

Pieces of Heart have been prominently featured throughout the Zelda series since A Link to the Past. Their purpose is to construct another heart container when Link collects a certain number. In most games thus far, the number of Pieces required for another Container Heart is four; however, in Twilight Princess, five are necessary to add to the count of heart containers that Link can earn. Phantom Hourglass returns to the original collection process—the entire piece of heart system is discarded, and only entire Heart Containers can be found.

On the subscreens in each game, the player can view the number of pieces that have been collected in progressing toward the next Heart Container.

Certain side-quests enable Link to obtain more than one piece of heart, but not more than one piece at a time. Occasional exceptions are shown, where Link is give two pieces in succession by visiting a particular character or completing another task in between, and in Majora's Mask, Link can use the all night mask to gain two pieces from the same character by listening to her stories. In The Wind Waker, pieces of heart can also be found by lowering the grappling hook at locations marked on various treasure charts.

Gossip StoneEdit

Gossip Stones are mysterious, gray stones, first introduced in Ocarina of Time. The stones were created by the Sheikah, and hold small bits of "secret" information. These small pieces of gossip, usually taken from an overheard conversation, are only discovered when the Mask of Truth is worn. The stones return with the same form and function in Majora's Mask. If Link places a bomb next to or uses the Blast Mask in front of a Gossip Stone, it will flash blue and then red, and then launch into space, eventually returning to their original spot. Gossip Stones can be flattened with the Megaton Hammer, or turned into a tall, skinny form with Din's Fire. If Link hits the stone with a sword, it briefly shakes, making a laughing noise similar to that of a Poe, and tells Link the time. If a stone is hit when it is blue or red after having been caught in a bomb explosion, it will stay that color and not launch. All item effects on the stones are temporary; the stone will re-appear in its normal form after a short time. In Ocarina of Time, if a non-transporting ocarina song is played at a Gossip Stone, a fairy will appear.

In The Wind Waker, Gossip Stones are small, rare pendants that can be used to communicate at a distance. These advanced Gossip Stones were created by Daphnes Nohansen Hyrule. Such pendants are used by Tetra and The King of Red Lions to communicate with Link.

In Twilight Princess, there are Howling Stones, which, while somewhat similar in appearance to Gossip Stones, have a hole in their center through which Link can hear a tune being carried on the wind. In his wolf form, Link is able to howl the melody of these songs, which causes a golden wolf to appear elsewhere in Hyrule. When Link finds the wolf in human form, he is transported to a special area where he can learn up to seven Hidden Skills from a former Hylian Knight. There is another version of the Howling Stones in Twilight Princess, which, instead of a circular hole, bears the shape of the Triforce on the stone.

Gossip Stones return in Phantom Hourglass. Most offer hints when struck with a sword, however, in most dungeons, there is a gossip stone on almost every floor, which reveals how many treasure chests are on the current floor, and offers to reveal their locations for 20 Rupees.

ElementsEdit

The Elements are the "crystalline manifestations" of the four elements of earth, fire, water, and wind. In The Minish Cap, the Elements are required to forge the Four Sword. As each Element, empowers the Four Sword, it allows Link to create an additional doppelganger. In Four Swords and Four Swords Adventures, Link's clones are each colored after one of the elements. The Three Keys needed to enter the final level in Four Swords are patterned after the Elements, and the four "Royal Jewels" needed to enter the final world in Four Swords Adventures appear identical to the Elements, and are placed on pillars around the Four Sword Sanctuary exactly as they are in The Minish Cap.

ReferencesEdit



Items/Boomerang

The boomerang is a common weapon in The Legend of Zelda series. It is typically used to stun enemies, retrieve items, and trigger switches. Some weak enemies can be defeated using the boomerang, and in some games the boomerang is capable of cutting down objects. The boomerang has two versions: a normal wooden boomerang and the magical boomerang, which flies farther and faster and can be directed after it is thrown.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

The boomerang first appeared in The Legend of Zelda. It stuns large enemies such as Moblins and kills smaller ones such as Keese. The normal boomerang is found in the first dungeon and the magical boomerang is found in the second.

A Link to the PastEdit

The boomerang returns in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, found in the basement of Hyrule Castle. Link can toss the boomerang into a fairy fountain to receive the magical boomerang.

Link's AwakeningEdit

The boomerang is an optional weapon in The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening and is received late in the game. To get the boomerang, Link must trade one of his weapons to a Moblin-like creature (probably a Goriya). The boomerang is significantly more powerful in the game, capable of defeating many enemies and cutting down bushes.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

The boomerang in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is used by young Link only. The only major difference in the boomerang is that it is now thrown from a first-person perspective.

Oracle of Seasons and Ages Edit

The normal boomerang was the same as in Link's Awakening however, there was also a Level-2 boomerang and could be controlled when thrown. And sometimes could kill a weak enemy, such as a Keese.

The Wind WakerEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, the boomerang gains a significant new feature. Before throwing the boomerang, Link can select up to five targets for the boomerang to hit before returning, which is crucial for certain puzzles involving switches that need to be triggered by the boomerang.

The Minish CapEdit

The wooden and magical boomerangs return in The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap. The wooden boomerang can be bought in town, and the magical boomerang is earned by fusing kinstones with Tingle and his brothers.

Twilight PrincessEdit

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess has the Gale Boomerang, which has elemental wind power, will appear in this game. It can also target multiple things and can carry objects from one place to another.



Items/Bow and Arrow

Bows and Arrows have been featured in every Legend of Zelda game except Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages, and The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons. It is the best weapon to be used for long range attacks.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

The bow is located in the first dungeon, and the first arrow must be purchased. After one has the first arrow, each arrow one fires costs 1 rupee and is taken directly from one's wallet as one fires. Later on in the game, one obtains the Silver Arrows, which are the items one uses to finally kill the final boss, Ganon.

A Link to the PastEdit

The bow and arrow is a powerful weapon. There is an even more powerful silver bow and arrow, but that is not required to defeat the final boss.

Link's AwakeningEdit

The bow can be purchased at the shop for 998 rupees. If you do not wish to pay, you can steal the arrows, but for the rest of the game you will be called THIEF. Press the bomb and arrow buttons at the same time to shoot a bomb arrow, blowing up an enemy from a distance.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, the bow is called the Hero Bow. It is gained in the Forest Temple, and is used to kill the Poe sisters, and the final boss, Phantom Ganon. This is the first game where fire, ice, and light arrows are introduced.

Majora's MaskEdit

The bow is known as Fairy's Bow in this game, and is found in Woodfall Temple. The fire, ice, and light arrows have a higher importance in this game.

Oracle of Ages and SeasonsEdit

The bow and arrow are replaced with the slingshot/seed shooter (OoS and OoA respectively) and seeds.

The Wind WakerEdit

The bow is once again called Hero's Bow. It is found in the Tower of the Gods, and is the item used (along with bombs) to defeat the boss of the level, Gohdan. The Hero's Bow is also used to defeat the wind spirit, Cyclos in his whirlwind. After you hit him with arrows three times, he teaches you Ballad of Gales. The fire, ice, and light arrows are also in this game, but the light arrows have a new ability. When they hit an enemy, they vaporize the enemy instantly in a blinding flash of light (this works with all enemies except Ganondorf and all his forms. They just hurt him or stun him.)

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

The bow is especially useful, since it's more powerful than the slingshot. A Level 2 bow can shoot three arrows at the same time, or twelve when all four Links shoot them.

The Minish CapEdit

The bow is found in the Fortress of Winds, and is used to beat the fortress boss, Mazaal. In addition the arrows could be upgraded to light arrows.

Twilight PrincessEdit

The bow and arrow was featured in a Twilight Princess trailer, where Link shoots some sort of flying creature. However, as soon as the bolt made contact, the arrow exploded. It was later confirmed that it was a combination of an arrow and a bomb; a move that has not been featured since Link's Awakening.



Items/Hookshot

HookShot is an item featured in some of the Legend of Zelda games by Nintendo. The most common form enables Link to fire the hook at an object (pots, rocks, etc) or an enemy. If fired at an enemy, it will just act as a long range attack weapon, but is not as effective as the bow and arrow. If it hits an object, it will pull Link towards the object, even if there is a gap in the way.

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

A Link to the PastEdit

This item made its debut in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. Link finds the hookshot in the Flooded Palace. While Link shoots it, he is invincible, and cannot be harmed. It is used to stun enemies, but mainly to pull Link across gaps. It hooks on the wooden items (trees, treasure boxes, etc.)

Link's AwakeningEdit

The hookshot is found in Catfish Maw, and is used to beat the boss, Slime Eel. When you enter the room to fight the mini-boss (Master Stalfos), he flees, and you do not receive the hook shot. When you go out, you will find a note say he found the "special item" that was there. Chase him down (he travels around a few different rooms) to finally beat him to gain the hookshot. It is used the same way, and is needed in order to learn the Frog's Song of Soul.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

For the first time, the plane is 3D, so you can now shoot the hook shot up in order to get to higher grounds. It won't hook to all woods; mainly on wooden bulls-eyes. It is obtained once you beat or at least nearly match Dampe in the graveyard race. In addition to its aid in travel, the hookshot can be used as a weapon, replacing young Link's boomerang as adult Link's unlimited ammo ranged weapon that can retrieve items it hits. To enter the Forest Temple, the Hookshot must be obtained. Later, for the first time in the series, the hookshot is upgraded, becoming the longshot. The longshot is twice as long as the original hookshot. It is used to get to the boss of the Water Temple, and in order to beat its boss. When you get captured by Gerudos, the longshot is needed in order to get out of their jail.

Majora's MaskEdit

The hookshot is located in Gerudo Lagoon. The Gerudo are talking with one another, with the hook shot in the room. Have Link shoot an arrow at the bee hive above them to scare them out. Go around and get the hookshot. It is need to get the Zora egg in the tank.

Oracle of AgesEdit

Whilst Oracle of Ages didn't actually feature a Hookshot, it featured a very similar item, the Switch Hook (and, later, the long hook). This still gives the ability to travel across gaps, but differs in the fact that, rather than being pulled towards the object, you switch places with it. This allowed for some interesting new puzzles for the game. You also switch places with enemies, rather than attacking them.

Wind WakerEdit

The hookshot makes another appearance in the Wind Waker. This time, it can hook to many different wooden objects. It is used to beat the boss of the Wind Temple, Molgera, and is needed to get on top of Ganon's Tower. The game also has a weaker version called the grappling hook which is found earlier in the game in Dragonroost Cavern upon finding Midli.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In Twilight Princess, an similar item called the Clawshot is used instead of the hookshot.

Super Smash Bros. SeriesEdit

In Super Smash Brothers, Link uses the hookshot to grab other players, stunning them and pulling them to him so he grabs them, upon which he can throw them to the ground, or throw them over his back and give them a back kick. In Melee, Young Link has the weapon as well, presumably referring to his use of the item in Majora's Mask. In addition to its previous abilities, the hookshot can be used to grab onto the edge of the platform when thrown off to the side, like Samus Aran's Grapple beam.



Items/Musical instruments

Musical instruments have been featured in every game of The Legend of Zelda series, except in Four Swords, Four Swords Adventures and Phantom Hourglass. Within the games, the instruments have been given different powers, ranging from summoning a creature, to changing the course of time.

OverviewEdit

While musical instruments have been featured in almost all of the Legend of Zelda games, and their use in musical puzzles has been widespread,[1] they tended to serve as triggers to game events. For example, triggering the recorder in the original Legend of Zelda will result in the revelation of "secret" areas. Application involved little more effort than selecting the instrument at the appropriate time. However, with the release of Ocarina of Time, mastering the instruments became a core part of the game, with the player required to learn to play the instrument through the use of the game controller in order to succeed.[2] Ocarina of Time was "the first contemporary nondance title to feature music-making as part of its gameplay"[3], employing music as a heuristic device and requiring the player to memorize songs in order to proceed through the game[4] - a game mechanic that reappeared in Majora's Mask[5] and, in different forms, The Wind Waker[6] and Twilight Princess.[7]

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

In the original Legend of Zelda, Link obtains a recorder. When the recorder is played while wandering the overworld, it will either summon a Whirlwind to teleport Link to an entrance of a dungeon (in order rather than randomly), or will reveal certain secrets. It is also necessary to use this flute to defeat the boss of the fifth dungeon, Digdogger. The Recorder is referenced in Super Mario Bros. 3 as the Warp Whistle. In addition to having a similar purpose, it plays the same tune.[8] The recorder's song is also mixed into the title screen music of Ocarina of Time.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

The recorder makes another appearance in The Adventure of Link.[9] It is used to scare off the river guardian so Link can access Southern Hyrule, and at a later time to reveal the entrance to the sixth palace.

A Link to the PastEdit

The flute looks more like an ocarina in A Link to the Past.[10] Playing it in front of the rooster statue in Kakariko releases a bird, which can be summoned by Link in any open-air area in the Light World to fly him to any one of eight pre-determined warp points.[10] It is also automatically used after the second battle with Agahnim to transport Link to the Pyramid of Power, where his showdown with Ganon takes place.

Link's AwakeningEdit

In Link's Awakening, the flute is called an Ocarina. Link must enter the Dream Shrine and go to sleep there, and then make his way through the shrine until he finally reaches the Ocarina. In the course of his journey Link will learn three songs: the "Ballad of the Wind Fish", "Manbo's Mambo", and "The Frog's Song of Soul". The Ballad of the Wind Fish is taught to Link by Marin, and is used to enter the Wind Fish's egg. It may also be used to instantly destroy all Pols Voice enemies on the screen. Manbo's Mambo teleports Link to Manbo's Pond (near Crazy Tracy's Health Spa) or to the entrance of the dungeon that Link is currently in, and The Frog's Song of Soul restores the Flying Rooster and allows Link to enter the eighth dungeon, Turtle Rock.

Additionally, Link must collect the eight Instruments of the Sirens from the dungeons in his quest to wake the Wind Fish. These are in order of the dungeons in which they are received:

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Early on in Ocarina of Time, Link is given the Fairy Ocarina by Saria as he leaves the forest after defeating Gohma in the Great Deku Tree, but the key instrument in this game is the titular Ocarina of Time, which Link receives from Princess Zelda as she flees Hyrule Castle with Impa.

Instruments are focused upon more in Ocarina of Time than in games released previously. Both ocarinas (but more especially the Ocarina of Time) possess several magical abilities that are come into play when certain songs are performed.[4] With either ocarina, Link can summon his horse and Fairies both great and small. After he obtains the Ocarina of Time, Link can additionally summon a scarecrow or a rainstorm, as well as transport large blue blocks that open new paths or are part of the puzzle element common to most Zelda games. He can also use the Ocarina of Time to transport himself to various locations in Hyrule. The ocarinas in the game rely a basic five-note (or pentatonic) scale which corresponds to different buttons on the game controller. However, with practice it is possible to reproduce a full scale.[4]

The use of an ocarina in the game produced a resurgence of interest in the instrument. Sales were reported to have increased dramatically, although interest tended to focus on the ceramic models, as featured within the game, rather than other styles.[11]

The character Sheik also demonstrates the ability to play a lyre, which she brings out when she teaches Link the various warp songs; however, Link cannot play it.

Majora's MaskEdit

The Ocarina of Time makes another appearance in Majora's Mask. It is stolen from Link by Skull Kid at the outset of the game, but Link retrieves it soon after. It has much the same functionality[12] with a few changes. Link not only has one teleporting song, which teleports him to multiple points, but a song that awakens, a song that puts people to sleep, a song that affects sea creatures, and a song that makes copies of himself, among others. As Link uses transformation masks, namely the Deku, Goron and Zora masks, the ocarina converts itself into a set of pipes, a set of drums and a bone guitar, respectively. The "Song of Storms" and "Epona's Song" return from Ocarina of Time, as does the "Song of Time" (though it now has a different, and a more vital purpose; it allows Link to rewind, fast forward, and slow down time, as well as save the game). At one point, Link plays the "Ballad of the Wind Fish" (a different tune which only shares the name of the song in Link's Awakening) using all of the instruments in order to obtain a mask.

Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of AgesEdit

In Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, Link receives the "Strange Flute", which serves primarily to summon one of his animal friends. The animal friend summoned depends on choices made in the game that determine his permanent friend. As part of the trading sequence in Oracle of Seasons, Link may also obtain a Phonograph that plays the "Song of Storms".

Harp of AgesEdit

The Harp of Ages is a musical item used to navigate time in Oracle of Ages. Link finds this item in the house of Nayru, the Oracle of Ages, and it is given to him to assist him on his journey after Nayru is kidnapped by Veran. At first, Link's only song is the "Tune of Echoes", which Nayru teaches to him telepathically when he obtains the Harp. The "Tune of Echoes" only allows Link to travel through time by activating dormant time portals found throughout Labrynna. Later, the composer Tokkey uses the Tune of Echoes Link plays for him to complete the composition of the "Tune of Currents", which allows Link to travel from the past to the present from anywhere in the overworld. Near the end of the game, Nayru teaches Link the third and final song, the "Tune of Ages", which allows Link to travel in either direction through time from nearly anywhere. The Tune of Currents and the Tune of Ages leave behind one-time-use portals back to the period Link came from when used. Like the Rod of Seasons in Oracle of Seasons, it is used to navigate the game and solve puzzles.

The Harp's abilities do not work in the Black Tower, Yoll Graveyard, and Sea of No Return areas.

The Wind WakerEdit

While not an actual musical instrument, The Wind Waker, which shares its name with the game's title, is a conductor's baton, the main purpose of which is to endow Link with the ability to control the winds.[13] The baton provides a unique game experience, as the player "conducts" music in 3/4, 4/4, and 6/8 time.[14]The baton serves a range of secondary purposes as well, from allowing Link to control statues and people (i.e. Makar and Medli), changing day into night and vice versa,[15] and opening doors to some dungeons. The Wind Waker is bestowed upon Link by the King of Red Lions, and is said to have been used in ancient times to conduct music for the gods.[16] Although the baton itself is not an instrument, there are featured instruments such as the violin (Makar and Fado) and the harp (Medli and Laruto), which are used to open Link's way forward at certain points during the game.. Fado tells Link that the King of Hyrule once used the Wind Waker to conduct the sages.

The Minish CapEdit

In The Minish Cap, the Ocarina of Wind is acquired halfway through the game; it summons a bird that flies Link to a chosen location as long as he has already gone to the place he is flying to and has smashed the Wind Crest there to unlock that destination.[17] The tune Link plays on the Ocarina of Wind is that of the recorder in The Legend of Zelda.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, the focus is much more on animals and more immediate, physical puzzles than music. However, in both human form and wolf form, Link can make use of reeds. The reeds, which can be found in set locations and only used when picked at that location, are shaped in a manner indicating the animal they used to summon. One calls a hawk (hence the reed is bird shaped), and the other summons Link's horse, Epona (and is therefore shaped like a horseshoe). The song Link plays on the hawk grass is new, while the song played on the horse grass is the traditional "Epona's Song".

As a wolf, Link can stand near grass or howling stones and howl a tune. The tune the grass normally plays is drawn in blue lines.

In addition to howling tunes from grass, Link in wolf form can also find oddly shaped rocks, messengers for the Hero's Spirit, that whistle oddly familiar tunes to summon the Hero's Spirit. When sitting next to these rocks, Link can listen to the song being played and howl it himself, and in turn learn a new attack. However, Link never gains the ability to retain any given melody.

The music system is different as well. When howling, Link holds one of three pitches for a set amount of time in order to play the song, as opposed to playing multiple short notes. When standing in a patch of grass, Link will howl the song it plays. When standing before a howling stone, Link will howl other songs (such as the "Song of Healing" from Majora's Mask).

Later in the game, Link receives the Horse Call, an instrument modeled after the horseshoe-shaped grass that allows Link to summon his horse from virtually all outdoor locations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Pichlmair, Martin; Kayali, Fares (2007). "Levels of Sound: On the Principles of Interactivity in Music Video Games". Situated Play, Proceedings of DiGRA 2007 Conference. http://www.digra.org/dl/db/07311.14286.pdf. 
  2. Lane, Pete (26 February, 1999). "Review: Legend of Zelda". BBC News. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/278662.stm. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  3. McDonald, Glenn (26 February, 1999). "A Brief Timeline of Video Game Music". Gamespot. http://www.gamespot.com/gamespot/features/video/vg_music/index.html. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  4. a b c Whalen, Zach (2007). "Play Along - An Approach to Videogame Music". Game Studies 4 (1). http://www.gamestudies.org/0401/whalen/. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  5. Mirabella, Fran. "Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask". IGN. http://ign64.ign.com/articles/151/151933p1.html. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  6. Bander, John (23 January, 2004). "Mighty Wind". The Daily Targum. http://media.www.dailytargum.com/media/storage/paper168/news/2004/01/23/InsideBeat/Mighty.Wind-586474.shtml. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  7. Buffa, Chris (November 17, 2006). "The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Review". Game Daily. http://ign64.ign.com/articles/151/151933p1.html. Retrieved 2008-04-06. 
  8. "Top 20 Nintendo cameos". CVG. February 10, 2008. http://www.computerandvideogames.com/article.php?id=181927. Retrieved 2008-03-06. 
  9. "Zelda II: The Adventure of Link". GameSpot. December 28, 2006. http://au.gamespot.com/nes/adventure/zelda2theadventureoflink/player_review.html?id=405098. Retrieved 2008-03-07. 
  10. a b Stratton, Bryan (2002). The Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past. Prima Games. 
  11. King, Sharon R. (March 5, 2008). "Compressed Data; Can You Play 'Feelings' On the Ocarina?". The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C00E0DE133AF936A25751C0A96F958260. Retrieved 2008-03-06. 
  12. "Majora's Mask". The Washington Post. 2000. 
  13. Davenport, Reid (April 4, 2003). "Link captures the hearts of America's gaming industry". The Daily Collegian. http://media.www.dailycollegian.com/media/storage/paper874/news/2003/04/04/ArtsLiving/Press.Start.To.Play-1553017.shtml. Retrieved 2008-03-06. 
  14. "'Zelda' returns to awaken moribund GameCube sales". Chicago Sun-Times. March 26, 2003. 
  15. Gerstmann, Jeff (March 21, 2003). "The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GameCube)". The New York Times. http://cnet.nytimes.com/gamecube-games/the-legend-of-zelda/4505-9583_7-30960407-2.html. Retrieved 2008-03-07. 
  16. Nintendo (2003), The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, in Chuen-Tsai Sun; Holin Lin & Cheng-Hong Ho, "Game Tips as Gifts: Social Interactions and Rational Calculations in Computer Gaming", DIGRA Conference 2003 
  17. "Zelda Universse". The Great Hyrule Encyclopedia. http://www.zelda.com/universe/pedia/o.jsp. Retrieved 2008-03-07. 



Items/Rupee

File:Zelda rupees.png
Rupees from the first and third Legend of Zelda installments

Rupees are the unit of currency in the fictional lands of Hyrule, Koholint Island, Termina, Labrynna, and Holodrum in The Legend of Zelda series of video games by Nintendo, acquired primarily by defeating enemies, by cutting tall grasses or bushes, or from treasure chests, and used primarily to purchase items in shops.

ValuesEdit

With the exception of The Adventure of Link and Four Swords Adventures, Rupees were included in all Zelda titles. The value of a Rupee is denoted by its color. In Four Swords and The Minish Cap, both size and color denote value. Link's Awakening, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages specify the Rupee value through text rather than color, because the Game Boy pallette was limited. The following lists the values of each Rupee color. Because the value of each color is inconsistent throughout the games, they are not listed in order of value. The list begins with the colors that appeared in the most Zelda titles.

Green Rupee
Small green Rupees are worth one, and large green Rupees are worth fifty. The green Rupee appears in seven games.

Blue Rupee
Small blue Rupees are worth five, and large blue Rupees are worth one hundred. The blue Rupee appears in eight games.

Red Rupee
Small red Rupees are worth twenty, and large red Rupees are worth two hundred. The red Rupee appears in seven games.

Purple Rupee
The purple Rupee exists in all four 3D Zelda games.

Silver Rupee
Debuting in Ocarina of Time, where collecting all five silver Rupees solved a puzzle in a particular room, the silver Rupee exists in all four 3D Zelda titles.

Yellow Rupee
Debuting in the original title, the yellow Rupee has appeared in three games.

Orange Rupee
The orange Rupee exists in the three of the four 3D Zelda titles.

Huge Rupee
Appearing either gold or dark orange, this Rupee's color is not specified textually and is simply called "huge." It exists in three games, although in Twilight Princess it can be found just once, at a very well hidden place.

Other Rupee Types

  • Black: In Four Swords, the black Rupee removes a random, negative amount of Rupees from the team wallet.
  • Rupee Shard: In Four Swords, Rupee shards are individually worthless but collecting eight creates a gem worth 500 Rupees.

Wallet SizeEdit

Link can carry a maximum amount of Rupees which varies among titles. In The Legend of Zelda, players are limited to carrying 255 Rupees (the maximum value an unsigned 8-bit integer can hold). In A Link to the Past, Link's Awakening, Oracle of Seasons, and Oracle of Ages, the Rupee limit is 999. Four Swords allows a maximum of 9999 Rupees shared among all players.

In five Zelda titles, the wallet size can be expanded, which increases the maximum amount of Rupees the player can carry. Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask first implemented this feature, where the initial maximum is 99 Rupees. Upgrading to the adult's wallet or to the giant's wallet increases the limit to 200 or 500 Rupees, respectively. In Majora's Mask, Rupees are one of the items that cannot be taken back in time with Link. However, there is a bank which retains deposited Rupees despite Link's time travel. The bank will not accept deposits if the balance meets or exceeds 5000 Rupees. Therefore, the maximum balance of 5499 Rupees occurs when the balance begins at 4999 and the player deposits an additional 500 Rupees.

The Wind Waker starts the capacity at 200, with wallet upgrades to 1000 and 5000. In The Minish Cap, capacity begins at 100, and increases to 300, 500, and finally 999. Twilight Princess begins Rupee capacity at 300, which can be upgraded to 600 and finally 1000.

BS The Legend of Zelda: Stone Tablets of Antiquity featured a maximum of 99,999 Rupees, more than any other Zelda game, but strict time limits reduced the chances of reaching this maximum.

SpellingEdit

Although later games have been more consistent, the manual for the original Legend of Zelda referred to the gems as rubies, while the scrolling screen in the game itself called them rupies (singular rupy). Thus, the origin of this word is likely a misinterpretation of the word ruby rather than an intentional reference to the real-life Indian currency, the rupee. This is supported by the similarity between the ビ (bi) and ピ (pi) characters in Japanese. Also note that the name of the currency in the French and German translation of the Zelda no Densetsu games is rubies. The spellings rupees and rupies are often used interchangeably.

UseEdit

Although Rupees are used most often to buy items in shops, occasionally they have other uses. In the original Legend of Zelda, one rupee is used up every time Link shoots an arrow. In A Link to the Past, if a set amount (100) of Rupees were thrown into a certain fairy fountain, a fairy would appear and increase Link's carrying capacity for bombs or arrows, at the player's choice. In Ocarina of Time, collecting all the Silver Rupees in a particular dungeon room unlocks the locked doors. Rupees are also central to the gameplay in the multiplayer Four Swords. As such, this game adds Black Rupees, which causes rupees to scatter across the ground; and Rupee Shards, which when collected eight of can add up to a Rupee of great value. In Twilight Princess, the optional Magic Armor is powered by Rupees, and when Link is hit, he loses Rupees instead of hearts. If Link runs out of Rupees while wearing the armor, his mobility is greatly reduced.

The only titles to feature monetary systems other than Rupees are Oracle of Seasons, where the Subrosians would only accept Ore Chunks as currency, and Four Swords Adventures, where the player(s) collects Force Gems rather than Rupees and although not an official currency in Hyrule, they are sometimes spent in exchange for something (such as a divination in Kakariko). Rupees were also absent in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, which had no currency system.

Appearances in other gamesEdit

  • Ingots, from Clu Clu Land, highly resemble Rupees from the original game. However, Clu Clu Land came first, meaning it is most likely intended as a cameo, much like the Book of Magic originating from Devil World.
  • Sometimes when looking through drawers in Animal Crossing, a message will say "You found 100 rupees! Too bad you can't use them here."
  • In Donkey Kong Country 3, after the refusal to buy a shell from Bazaar Bear, he claims that some guy named Link didn't have enough Bear Coins but wanted to pay in Rupees instead. After that he left, muttering about his shell being the wrong shape or something, which also references the shells Link collects in Link's Awakening.



Weapons/Master Sword

File:MasterSword.PNG
The Master Sword in its pedestal, as seen in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, its first official appearance.

The Master Sword (マスターソード, Masutā Sōdo) is a fictional magic sword from Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda series. Created by Shigeru Miyamoto, The Legend of Zelda is one of Nintendo's flagship game franchises, which sold over 47 million copies worldwide as of 2007.[1] The series' enduring popularity has led to many incarnations of the Zelda story and of the Master Sword itself. It was first fully introduced in the third game in the series, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. The sword traditionally rests in sacrosanct locations indigenous to Hyrule, such as the Temple of Time or the Lost Woods. It is alternatively known as "The Blade of Evil's Bane". In the French versions of the games, the Master Sword has always been named after legendary sword Excalibur. In general, it acts as the ultimate weapon for the chief protagonist, Link. It has a tendency to either decrease in power between games, as in The Wind Waker and the Oracle series, needing to be "recharged" in some way, or increase in power during the games beyond its standard level, as in Twilight Princess and A Link to the Past.

The sword also doubles as a key to the Sacred Realm. While it impedes evil's ability to act, its seal is not inviolable. A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, and The Wind Waker all begin just as Ganon is finding a way around the sword's power. In the latter two games, drawing the sword from its pedestal releases the seal completely, allowing evil to act. However, it also anoints the hero, and with the sword in hand, he is ultimately able to defeat Ganon.

The Master Sword has the power to "repel evil", which enables it to overcome powerful dark magic, curses and so on. Evil people and beings cannot touch or wield the sword.

IdentificationEdit

The Master Sword (a.k.a Blade of Evil's Bane) is a double-edged one-handed sword created by the Sages of Hyrule. The blade cross-section is hexagonal with no fuller. On the flats of the blade near the hilt is a Triforce symbol, etched into the steel or emblazoned in gold. The section of the blade nearest the hilt (between the Triforce and the crossguard) is narrowed, possibly for use as an extra grip though Link never uses it this way. The crossguard is blue/purple and curved slightly away from the hilt. A jewel resembling a yellow cat's eye is set where the hilt meets the crossguard. The hilt is often padded red with a non-ornate blue pommel. In Twilight Princess (and Super Smash Bros. Brawl), the hilt is purple rather than blue. In The Wind Waker, the sword is considerably shorter in length (probably to fit the younger Link's hands) and the edges of hilt are close together until the sword has been charged. When fully charged, the blade glows and the jewel on the hilt is a bright yellow. The glowing effect is retained in Twilight Princess, though to a lesser extent.

When not in use by Link, the sword is either stored in a scabbard across Link's back or in a sacred location within Hyrule. In Ocarina of Time, it was originally stored in the Temple of Time, protected by the Door of Time. Later, in Twilight Princess, the sword is retrieved from the ruins of the same temple in the Sacred Grove. Finally, in A Link to the Past, the sword is once again found in a pedestal in the Sacred Grove, though no other ruins are present. The grove is proportioned similar to the Temple of Time from Ocarina of Time, with the pedestal occupying the same position. In The Wind Waker, the sword is stored within a secret chamber in Hyrule Castle at the bottom of the ocean.

AppearancesEdit

A Link to the PastEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

The sword that was destined to slay Ganon was sealed in a pedestal deep within the Lost Woods. This pedestal would only relinquish the Master Sword to one who had shown true courage (similar in nature to the legend of the Sword in the Stone). After gathering the Pendants of Courage, Wisdom, and Power, Link was able to draw the blade and use it to fight the forces of darkness. When Link's health was full, the sword allowed Link to shoot spiraling waves of magic energy from it in an attack called the Beam Attack, and does twice as much damage as Link's starting sword (the beams are no more powerful than the starting blade). The Dwarven Smithies turned the Master Sword into the Tempered Sword, and the Great Fairy in the Pyramid of Power, upon having the Tempered Sword thrown into her Fairy Fountain, transformed it into the stronger Golden Sword, giving it unknown mystical abilities for future heroes to discover. After defeating Ganon at the end of the game, Link returned the sword to its pedestal, where it rested forever, according to the text at the end of the game. (Though the "forever" part was removed in the GBA version.)

In the Japanese language version, the Tempered and Golden Swords are simply called the "Level 3" and "Level 4" Master Sword.

Link's AwakeningEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

There is no mention of the Master Sword in this game. However, Link can obtain the Seashell Blade, also noted as the Level-2 sword; the DX version of the game names this the Master Sword, and depicts it using a different sprite. It is otherwise the same.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

The Spiritual Stones — the Kokiri's Emerald, the Goron's Ruby, and the Zora's Sapphire — along with the Ocarina of Time and Song of Time, are the keys to the Door of Time which protects the Master Sword. The sword serves both as an entryway to the Sacred Realm, and as a controller of the flow of time, allowing Link to travel between the future and the past. Its magical properties are the key to locking the King of Evil, Ganondorf, into exile.

As in A Link to the Past, the Master Sword has the ability to deflect magical bolts (notably in the battle with Phantom Ganon and Ganondorf). However, it does not fire bolts unless Link is at full health, the feature was implemented in the beta version, but removed.

Only the Biggoron's Sword is stronger, but it must be wielded with both hands and cannot be used with a shield. In addition, in the final boss battle, it does not matter how many times players strike Ganon with any weapon, he cannot be defeated until the last blow is struck with the Master Sword.

The pedestal before the door of the chamber that holds the sword bears the following inscription:

Ye who owns 3 Spiritual Stones,
Stand with the Ocarina of Time and play the Song of Time.

Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of AgesEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages

In a password-linked game, players are able to give their sword new power, and it is renamed from the Noble Sword to the Master Sword. The Master Sword is initially found broken in two, or hidden deep within the Lost Woods, depending on which game was played first. The Master Sword is the Level 3 Sword of the game, second only to the Biggoron's Sword in attack power. The Master Sword is the only weapon capable of damaging Ganon without charging a spin attack.

In Oracle of Ages, the Noble Sword is an heirloom given to the Zoras, and if this game is played first, then it can be "sharpened" by Zoran royalty to become the Master Sword, indicating that the Noble Sword may be a weakened Master Sword, much like its appearance in The Wind Waker. In Oracle of Seasons, the Noble Sword is found in a shrine hidden in the Lost Woods, echoing its location in A Link to the Past, and if this game is played first, an old man living under the Clock Shop will give it "new power" if Link completes a monster slaying mini-game.

Because the Master Sword has no role in the plot, and is only available through exchanging passwords, its canonicity, is uncertain, as is its relationship (if any) to the Master Sword of the other games.

The Wind WakerEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

After Link has proven his worth, the gods open the way to Hyrule and its castle, Hyrule Castle, now located deep beneath the sea. When he first arrives there, the entire castle is frozen in time, a whole army of enemies locked in one moment during an attack on the castle. The Master Sword is located in a hidden chamber in the basement of the castle (located underneath the statue of the Link in Ocarina of Time) and, when removed, this army is unfrozen. Ganon soon reveals that the sword was sealing back his powers, and that furthermore, the sword has lost its power, and is unable to harm him. A major part of the quest in The Wind Waker involves restoring the power of the Master Sword by returning sages to the temples, the Earth Temple and the Wind Temple, in order to pray for the Master Sword and the hero who wields it. When the two sages have been returned, the Master Sword returns to its full power and enables Link to break the barrier between the castle and the path to Ganon's lair, the final dungeon of the game. At the very end, Link plunges the Master Sword into Ganon's forehead, which turns him to stone. The Master Sword is then seemingly lost in the ocean, still stuck in Ganon's head as he is swallowed by the rising water.

When the Master Sword is first acquired, its hilt guard is locked upwards and the gem in the center is black (also being much smaller than other Master Sword incarnations). Later on in the game, the guards are extended outwards, the gem becomes yellow, and the sword glows when unsheathed. The sword is notably shorter than previous interpretations, most likely due to the art style.

Twilight PrincessEdit

See also: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess

In Twilight Princess, the Master Sword is found at the Sacred Grove, in the ruins of the Temple of Time. It is used to purge the curse on Link, allowing him to return to his human form after he has been locked in his wolf form by Zant (and, once again, to give him the power to defeat Ganon, like in previous games). After that, he has the ability to change between his two forms which includes the human, and wolf form at his own will. It is later upgraded to hold the light of a Sol, the equivalent of a sun in the Twilight Realm, which glows with an evil-destroying aura which can break Shadow Crystals. It shines brightest in the Twilight Realm, where it can dissipate the fog that previously required Link to be in wolf form to navigate. In addition, the light-infused Master Sword has its power multiplied many times against creatures of twilight, slaying most if not all of them in a single blow.

The sword also has a few cosmetic changes done to it in the game similar to the aesthetics in the Temple of Time dungeon. In addition to the fact that the metal comprising the weapon appears completely immune to corrosion, (as per being exposed to the elements for centuries) while the Temple of Time had crumbled into ruins in the Faron Woods, it is also noted that the Master Sword in Twilight Princess appears comparatively longer than the Master Sword wielded by Link in Ocarina of Time and The Wind Waker, and again gives of a glow of light similar to in The Wind Waker. Also, there appears to be zig-zagging gold trim upon the blade, near its Triforce symbol.

Super Smash Bros. seriesEdit

See also: Super Smash Bros. series

In Super Smash Bros. and Super Smash Bros. Melee, Link is similar to his appearance in Ocarina of Time, armed with the Master Sword. In Melee, "Young Link" is also available as a playable character and appears as he does in Ocarina of Time, armed with the Kokiri Sword. In Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Link appears as he does in Twilight Princess, again with the Master Sword, and "Toon Link", based on Link's The Wind Waker appearance, wields the The Wind Waker version of the Master Sword. It is interesting to note, however, that the fairy following Twilight Princess Link as he pulls the Master sword in Subspace Emissary mode bears a striking resemblance to Navi, the fairy from Ocarina of Time, and that the place he pulls it from looks nothing like the Sacred Grove from Twilight Princess, resembling more of the Lost Woods from A Link to the Past.

In Super Smash Bros. Melee's Adventure Mode, the Underground Maze stage involves the player searching for the Triforce in a labyrinth. There are seven rooms in the labyrinth where it may be found at which point the stage ends. The location is random; instead of the Triforce, one is more likely to come across the Master Sword set into a small pedestal. It vanishes when approached, at which point Link appears and forces a battle. There are five such swords in this stage, and thus up to five battles with Link (in every possible color, unless the player is playing as Link) that the player may experience.

The description of the Master Sword trophy in the NTSC version erroneously states that the Master Sword first appears in Ocarina of Time, as the game was intended to be, at that time, the earliest in the storyline.[citation needed] The first game released that features the "Master Sword" is A Link to the Past. This error was corrected in the PAL and NTSC Player's Choice versions.

Appearances in other mediaEdit

  • In Soulcalibur II, the Master Sword is Link's basic and most balanced weapon and companion to the Hylian Shield. The Magical Sword from the original The Legend of Zelda is also available as a weapon. The Master Sword is also used as the sword when the Mirror Shield is selected.
  • There is a piece of furniture called the Master Sword in Animal Crossing for the Nintendo GameCube and Animal Crossing: Wild World for the Nintendo DS. On the DS game, if the player touches the sword, the trademark Zelda "new item" sound plays.
  • There is a microgame in WarioWare: Smooth Moves where the player re-enacts the drawing of the Master Sword in Ocarina of Time. While the scene plays out normally on level 1, on level 2 Link is turned into an old man and level 3 Link is turned into a Cucco.
  • In the MMORPG World of Warcraft, there is a character named Linken, a left-handed Gnome who dresses in a green hat and tunic. Through the quest "It's dangerous to go alone" (a tribute to the first The Legend of Zelda) it is possible to obtain "Linken's Sword of Mastery", a nod from Blizzard Entertainment's developers to Link's Master Sword and the Legend of Zelda series. Players that complete the quest also obtain "Linken's Boomerang", a nod to the boomerang Link uses in nearly every game.
  • The Master Sword appears in Shining Soul II, and it can only be wielded by Warrior and Ninja classes.
  • In Hamtaro: Ham-Ham Heartbreak, a dark cave with paths leading back to the beginning (similar to the Lost Woods) hides a pedestal with three missing jewels (marbles) in the center (resembling the Spiritual Stones of Ocarina of Time), and when all three are placed, a sword can be removed from the pedestal, revealing it to be but a spoon with a fancy hilt.

ReferencesEdit

  1. David (2005). "Nintendo reveal sales figures". Australia's PAL Gaming Network. http://palgn.com.au/article.php?id=3605&sid=4cea9e5e814470cb7ea6fd462d04a13e. Retrieved 2006-02-12. 



Locations/Hyrule

Hyrule (ハイラル, Hairaru) is a fantasy world portrayed in The Legend of Zelda video game series created by Nintendo and Nintendo's leading game designer, Shigeru Miyamoto, and the setting where most Zelda games take place. It most commonly refers to the Kingdom of Hyrule where the Royal Family of Hyrule resides, but can also apply to the surrounding lands and world not governed by the kingdom. Template:TOClimit

Hyrule in the seriesEdit

The land of Hyrule, first depicted in The Legend of Zelda, released in February 1986 for the Famicom Disk System, is the backdrop for the adventures of the boy-to-hero protagonist Link. During the events of the game, Link progresses through Hyrule, and nine dungeons, the latter of which have become a staple of the series, appearing in every game since.

Many designated areas of Hyrule appear throughout the series, such as the Lost Woods, Kakariko Village, Death Mountain, and Lake Hylia. Several games in the series take place in lands other than Hyrule, including Link's Awakening, set on Koholint Island, Majora's Mask, set in Termina, Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages, set in Holodrum and Labrynna respectively, and The Wind Waker and Phantom Hourglass, both set on the Great Sea, a flooded Hyrule.

Formation of HyruleEdit

Hyrule was formed by the goddesses Din, Farore, and Nayru. According to Hylian legend as depicted in Ocarina of Time, Din created the physical geography of the realm, Nayru set forth the laws that would govern the land, and Farore created the many races who would uphold the law, as well as the flora, and fauna that inhabit the world. Once the goddesses had completed their tasks, they departed for the heavens, and left behind them three golden triangles. Into these they put their power to govern all things; this relic became known as the Triforce.[1] The realm itself was eventually named after its dominant race, the Hylia.[2]

Hylian languageEdit

Hylian is also the name of the constructed language created by Nintendo to be used by the Hylians. The characters are composed mostly of square-like symbols and dots with a small number of curved or diagonal lines, and changes slightly from game to game. The written form of Hylian is derived from Japanese hiragana, katakana, and romaji in its first appearances (and also is reminiscent of Cyrillic languages), though is based on English in Twilight Princess.

Hylian first appeared in A Link to the Past, though just identified as "the ancient language of the Hylians". Its written form was made up of nonsensical symbols that had to be translated by Link using the mysterious "Book of Mudora" to progress in the game.

In Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask, the scripting appeared on signs, gravestones and more. While no official translations or character sets have been released by Nintendo, some fans have created versions themselves[3] by observing and translating the inscriptions in the game and on the game's box art. The script used in The Wind Waker (see below) is also used on the headbands of Kotake and Koume.

In The Wind Waker, the intro sequence had paintings with the language below it, throughout the game there are three spirits (the angler fish-like Jabun, the dragon Valoo, and the Deku Tree), who are all able to speak it. Once the game is finished there is an option for a second quest, in this version of the game all Hylian speech is translated. In Japan, an explanation on the Hylian alphabet was printed on the back of the instruction manual, proving that the language is actually written like Japanese, but using different symbols.[4][5]

In Twilight Princess, the language is represented by an alphabet based directly upon the Latin one, and the Hylian language in the game is in English[6]. The script used in The Wind Waker is also used on tombstones in Kakariko Village Graveyard.

CurrencyEdit

The currency of the Zelda series is called the Rupee, and is used in Hyrule, the Great Sea, Koholint Island, Termina, Labrynna, and Holodrum. Rupees resemble hexagonal crystals or gems, and come in various colors which determine value. Rupees are acquired primarily by defeating enemies, cutting tall grass or bushes, or by opening treasure chests, and are used primarily to purchase items in shops and play minigames. It is revealed in The Minish Cap that the reason why Rupees are usually hidden in grass is because the tiny Minish race hide them in bushes as gifts for humans to find. Link cannot hold more Rupees than his current wallet size (each wallet holding only a certain number of Rupees), and Rupees collected after the wallet reaches capacity are not accumulated. Availability and sizes of Link's wallets vary from game to game, and Link's Rupee-carrying capacity generally starts off small with upgrades to larger wallet sizes available throughout the game (with the exception of The Legend of Zelda, where there is no wallet system, as only 255 Rupees can be collected at any time, as well as A Link to the Past and Link's Awakening, where the player can carry up to 999 Rupees, and Phantom Hourglass, where the maximum Link can carry is 9,999).

Although Rupees are used most often to buy items in shops, occasionally they have other uses. In the original The Legend of Zelda, Link's quiver capacity is limited to the number of Rupees he carries; therefore, when his Rupee stash is depleted, he can no longer use arrows until he collects more. In A Link to the Past, if Link throws 100 Rupees into a certain fairy fountain, a Great Fairy appears to increase his carrying capacity for bombs or arrows, at the player's choice. In Ocarina of Time, collecting five Silver Rupees in a particular room in certain dungeons is a type of puzzle. Rupees are also central to the gameplay in the multiplayer stages of Four Swords. This game contains Black Rupees — which cause the player to drop Rupees all over the ground — and Rupee Shards, which, when eight are collected, become a Rupee of great value. In Phantom Hourglass, the Black Rupee is given the name "Rupoor", and depletes Rupees depending on what size it is whenever Link comes into contact with one. In Twilight Princess, the Magic Armor is magically powered by Rupees, and when Link is hit while wearing it, he loses Rupees instead of hearts. If Link runs out of Rupees while wearing the armor, his mobility is greatly reduced, and he starts taking life damage again when hit.

The only titles so far that feature monetary systems other than Rupees is Oracle of Seasons, where, in addition to Rupees, the Subrosian race accepts only Ore Chunks as currency, and Four Swords Adventures, where the lead characters collect Force Gems rather than Rupees. Rupees are also absent in The Adventure of Link, which has no apparent in-game currency system, but which is generally still assumed to be using the same Rupee-based economy within the kingdom as The Legend of Zelda.

Colors and valueEdit

The original The Legend of Zelda only has flashing Rupees, worth one, and blue Rupees, worth five. Subsequent games introduced more colors and sizes for Rupees, each denoting a specific value. Generally, green Rupees have the least value, while huge gold or silver Rupees have the most. There are also Rupees that serve puzzle purposes, like the Silver Rupees in Ocarina of Time, and Rupees that drain Link's wallet, like the Rupoors in Phantom Hourglass.

Appearance Value (Rupees) Game
Green 1 The value of Blue and Green Rupees is reversed in Link's Awakening DX
Blue 5
Silver 5 Ocarina of Time (in puzzles)
Yellow 10 The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess
Red 20
Purple 50 Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, The Wind Waker, and Twilight Princess
Orange 100 The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess
Silver 100 Majora's Mask
Big green 100 Phantom Hourglass
Big red 100 Oracle of Seasons and Oracle of Ages
Silver 200 The Wind Waker and Twilight Princess
Big orange/gold 200 Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask and The Wind Waker
Big red 200 Phantom Hourglass
Big gold 300 Phantom Hourglass
Black Removes 10 Phantom Hourglass (referred to as "Rupoor")
Big black Removes 50 Phantom Hourglass (referred to as "Rupoor")

Demographics and governmentEdit

Main page: Races in The Legend of Zelda series

Hylian geographyEdit

Recurring locationsEdit

Hyrule FieldEdit

Otherwise known generally as the overworld or Hyrule overworld, Hyrule Field is the term for the land of Hyrule as a whole, or, more accurately, as the area that connects all of the various locations around Hyrule. Hyrule Field is essential to all of the Zelda games set in the land of Hyrule, as it is where much of the non-dungeon-based gameplay takes place. Valuable items can often be found in holes and under rocks, as well as in bushes and grass scattered throughout Hyrule Field, and all of these things will further Link's various quests. In addition, many enemies can be found in Hyrule Field, many of which yield rewards when defeated. In A Link to the Past and Four Swords Adventures, it is enmeshed with the swamp.

Death MountainEdit

File:SpectacleRock.png
Spectacle Rock at the summit of Death Mountain, as seen in A Link to the Past.

Death Mountain (デスマウンテン, Desu-Maunten) is a large mountain (occasionally a volcano, as well) that first appeared in the original The Legend of Zelda for the Famicom Disk System and NES, and has subsequently appeared in several games since in the series.

Death Mountain, in all of its appearances, is riddled with caves and dungeons, including Ganon's lair in The Legend of Zelda and Goron City, the Fire Temple and Dodongo's Cavern in Ocarina of Time. When viewed from afar (as in Ocarina of Time), Death Mountain appears as an ominous volcano, with a ring of smoke surrounding its peak. It is said in Ocarina of Time that the ring of smoke reflects the state of affairs at the mount: when all is peaceful, the ring is white and calm, but when things go awry, it turns violently ashen, and seemingly aflame. A large number of Tektites and Lynels exist on the outside of the mountain. Boulders also constantly fall from above in certain places. A recurring part of Death Mountain is Spectacle Rock, two large rock formations next to each other that appear in most games along with the mountain itself.

In The Legend of Zelda, Spectacle Rock is the entrance to Ganon's lair, and is heavily guarded. In A Link to the Past, it blocks the way to the Mountain Tower. Two rocks resembling Spectacle Rock appear in Ocarina of Time, inside Death Mountain Crater. One of the rocks has a Piece of Heart on top, but other than that, they hold little importance in the game. In quadrant B-3 of The Wind Waker's Great Sea, there is Spectacle Island, that bears some similar geography to the recurring Spectacle Rock. The island is composed of two circular regions placed closely enough together to form one island.

File:Zelda1 Spectacle Rock.png
Spectacle Rock in The Legend of Zelda.

In The Legend of Zelda, Death Mountain is an area occupying much of the northwestern part of the map. It contains some of the most difficult enemies in the game, and is also where Link enters Levels 5 and 9. Level 9 — Ganon's lair, and the final level in the game — is discovered by bombing a portion of Spectacle Rock, and even then is only accessible after completing all other levels and assembling the Triforce. Death Mountain is inhabited by Tektites, Lynels, and falling rocks. There is a lake on the east end which flows into a waterfall, which in turn flows into a river flowing into Lake Hylia. The Lost Hills are located directly east of the Death Mountain area.

In The Adventure of Link, Death Mountain is in the southwest portion of the map. This area consists of a maze of caves. Here, Spectacle Rock makes its second appearance in the series.

In A Link to the Past, Death Mountain is the area which occupies much of the upper area of the map. It is the location of the Tower of Hera in the Light World, and Ganon's Tower and Turtle Rock in the Dark World. It is again inhabited by Tektites, Lynels, and falling rocks. When first visiting the mountain, Link encounters a lost old man in the cave-system leading to the area. After guiding him through the paths, the old man will heal Link when he visits. Spectacle Rock only exists in the Light World, where it blocks the route to the Tower of Hera, forcing Link to temporarily enter the Dark World to bypass it. Between the rocks is a cave route that leads down and out of the mountain. The Japanese game refers only to the Dark World mountain as Death Mountain, calling the ones in the Light World "Hebra Mountain" instead. This has never happened in any later Zelda games, so it is assumed the change during translation was deliberate and intended by the creators.

In Ocarina of Time, Death Mountain is a volcano located in the far northeast reaches of Hyrule, and is only accessible through Kakariko Village and the Lost Woods (via warp). The Fire Temple is located inside Death Mountain Crater, and houses Volvagia, an ancient dragon. Two rocks resembling Spectacle Rock appear inside Death Mountain Crater, in front of the entrance to the Fire Temple. Their appearance is more conic and heaped, and a Piece of Heart rests on top of one of them. Volcanic smoke billows out of the tips of each rock, though there are no natural chimney stacks visible at the peaks. It is evident from its structure and that of the Fire Temple that the upper floors of the Fire Temple may extend into the interior of these two mounds.

Ocarina of Time also introduces Death Mountain as the place where Gorons live. The Gorons live inside a cave network with four levels called Goron City. Their stable supply of rock (for nourishment) comes from Dodongo's Cavern, which, in the time just before Ganondorf's invasion, had been overrun by the extinct race of Dodongos and the mighty King Dodongo. Beyond Goron City, Death Mountain can be climbed, although Tektites and falling rocks will impede Link's path. Along with an entrance to Death Mountain Crater, a Great Fairy's Fountain is hidden at the summit; the Great Fairy there grants Link her magic power. Inside the crater is a second Great Fairy's Fountain, where Link's magic meter can be doubled.

In The Wind Waker, a location similar to Death Mountain, Dragon Roost Island, exists in the north-east area of the map, and contains a cavern similar to Ocarina of Time's Death Mountain Crater.

In Twilight Princess, Death Mountain is a volcano once again, located close to Kakariko Village. The Goron race live mostly on the outside of the mountain, but also have a volcanic mine area known as the Goron Mines. Lava flows inside the mines, and there is a hot spring located outside behind its entrance. Link is not able to enter the mine at first, but as the story progresses, Gor Coron, a Goron elder temporarily ruling in the patriarch's stead, will allow Link to enter after defeating him at sumo wrestling, to search for their possessed leader Darbus. The entrance to a cavern resembling Ocarina of Time's Dodongo's Cavern can be seen in the distance, near the peak of Death Mountain.

Ganon's TowerEdit

In A Link to the Past, Ganon's Tower stands atop Death Mountain in the Dark World, in the same location the Tower of Hera resides in the Light World. Link vanquishes Ganon's alter-ego Agahnim at the peak of the tower, but Ganon rises from the remains and flies to the Pyramid, where Link destroys him.

In the adult half of Ocarina of Time, Ganon's Castle has replaced Hyrule Castle as a dark fortress floating above a lake of lava. Once Link awakens the six sages, they are able to create a rainbow bridge across the lake and into the castle. Inside, Link must destroy six barriers based on the six temples in the game in order to destroy a magical barrier around Ganon's Tower, the central spire of the castle. After Link defeats Ganondorf at the top, the castle crumbles, and Link again fights Ganon in the ruins.

In The Wind Waker, Ganon's Tower lies at the end of a broken road from Hyrule Castle that is cordoned by a magical barrier. After Link shatters the barrier with the Master Sword, he can enter the tower, where he must rematch against the four dungeon bosses in order to proceed into the rest of the tower, in a scenario reminiscent of Ocarina of Time. The tower also possesses an underground labyrinth, and a portal to the Forsaken Fortress. Ganondorf himself waits at the peak of the tower.

While Ganon's Tower does not appear in Twilight Princess, Zant and Ganondorf have taken over Hyrule Castle and warped it to be functionally similar. Undead monsters and ghosts have overrun the graveyard, while Bublins have set up a camp in the gardens. Much of the castle structure, primarily the staircases, has been destroyed since Zant's attack. There is also a perpetual storm in the immediate area of the castle. The background music of the castle also denotes this metamorphosis — while it begins as the traditional "Hyrule Castle" theme, it becomes a mixture of both it and the "Ganon's Castle" theme as Link progresses through the castle, and at the end, is solely Ganon's theme.

Gerudo ValleyEdit

Gerudo Valley (ゲルドの谷, Gerudo no Tani) is a desert are that appears in A Link to the Past, Ocarina of Time, Four Swords Adventures, and Twilight Princess. It is commonly the home of the Gerudo, a race of female thieves.

The desert first appears in A Link to the Past, in which it is known as the "Desert of Mystery". The desert is located to the west of the swamp, with a narrow canyon connecting it to the rest of the kingdom. It contains the Desert Palace, the hiding place of the Pendant of Power. Thieves, instead, are located mostly in the Lost Woods as well as certain caves.

In Ocarina of Time, Gerudo Valley is located to the west of Hyrule Field, across a ravine carved out by Zora's River, which flows from Hyrule Castle, through the ravine, and to Lake Hylia in a series of cataracts. Just across the ravine is the Gerudo Fortress, where the Gerudo keep their lodging, prison, and training centers. At the other side of the fortress is a large gate leading into the Haunted Wasteland, a large expanse of desert haunted by ghosts. At the other end of the wasteland is the Desert Colossus, and the Spirit Temple within it. The Desert Colossus is an immense statue of the Gerudos' "Goddess of Sand", a naga-like female figure with her palms opened and raised upwards. A replica of the statue lies within the temple. In the child-half of the game, the Spirit Temple is used as a base for Ganon's evil operations, but in the adult, he has moved on to destroy Hyrule Castle, and build a castle of his own there.

In Four Swords Adventures, the "Desert of Doubt" is the home of the Gerudo and Zuna villages. A strong wind blows through the desert, and the Gerudo claim it is meant to keep intruders from the Pyramid. The Pyramid, built by the Zuna, is sacred to both tribes, and is said to contain an evil spirit. The Desert Temple, very similar to both the Desert Palace, is claimed to have been built in order to guard the Pyramid.

In Twilight Princess, which takes place about a century after Ocarina of Time, only the Gerudo Desert remains. It is a barren wasteland, with little of interest except for the Cave of Ordeals, a Bulblin encampment, and the Arbiter's Grounds, an ancient execution site, home to the Sages and Mirror of Twilight. The Arbiter's Grounds, especially the Mirror Chamber, contain many similar snake motifs that imply that it may be a renamed Spirit Temple, or else the original form of the Desert Palace from A Link to the Past, very closely geographically corresponding as it does to the palace's location in the later game. The Twili were once sent here to be imprisoned in the Twilight Realm. Some time after the events of Ocarina of Time, Ganondorf was taken to the Arbiter's Grounds, and after a botched execution, was also imprisoned in the Twilight Realm.

Hyrule CastleEdit

Hyrule Castle (ハイラル城, Hairaru-jō) is the home and seat of the royal family of Hyrule. The castle's first appearance was in A Link to the Past, the third game in the series. Each game that contains a Hyrule Castle either features a different layout, or denies the player access to parts that are available in other games.

Though the appearance and architecture of Hyrule Castle vary somewhat, several aspects are consistent throughout multiple Zelda titles. It generally appears as a cross between a motte-and-bailey and concentric castle, with an outer wall surrounding the inner residence, and is usually surrounded by a moat. Especially in the more recent The Legend of Zelda titles, it is a primarily white castle with tall, angular spires covered in bluish rooftops.

File:Hyrule Castle courtyard in A Link to the Past.png
Screenshot of Hyrule Castle courtyard in the Light World in A Link to the Past.

Hyrule Castle first appears in A Link to the Past, where it is situated in the middle of Hyrule, and appears to be the seat of power of the government, as well as the home of Princess Zelda. During the course of the game, Link must break into the castle. He manages to gain entrance via a secret passage on the eastern side of the castle. It has a total of six floors, and features a courtyard and moat. There is also a secret passage within that leads to a sanctuary north of the castle. The castle's counterpart in the Dark World, is the Pyramid of Power, where Ganon received the Triforce.

In Ocarina of Time, the castle is first seen during the opening credits. The castle is situated west of Death Mountain and just directly north of Hyrule Castle Town (which also contains the Market area). The entrance to Hyrule Castle Town alone is protected by a moat and a drawbridge, which lowers only during the day. Beyond Hyrule Castle Town is a path which leads eventually to Hyrule Castle, but features a gate, and several guards along the way. In order to infiltrate the castle, Link must sneak past each guard until he gets to the castle itself, which is surrounded by a moat. Link never directly enters any "important" parts of the castle, but he does manage to enter the courtyard (where he meets Zelda) using a secret entrance on the east side (similar to his infiltration in A Link to the Past). Sometime during the seven years that pass after Link's disappearance, Ganon destroys Hyrule Castle, and replaces it with Ganon's Castle.

File:OoT Hyrule Castle.png
The castle itself, as it appears in Ocarina of Time, stands on a hilltop and has a small moat (not visible from the angle this image was taken).

The castle is a monarchical castle lying north of Hyrule Field, and is the center of most of the game's events. It appears as a cross between a motte-and-bailey and concentric castle, with the moat and outer walls surrounding Hyrule Castle Town, the Temple of Time, and the royalty's inner castle, which stands on a meadowed plateau. The inner castle itself is surrounded by a small moat, and contains extensive gardens. Both the outer and inner castles use drawbridges at their gates.

In The Wind Waker, Hyrule Castle is at first frozen in time, under the Great Sea, and is accessible at the site of the Tower of the Gods. Only the large main hall and a small courtyard may be visited. The main hall contains a statue of the Hero of Time, Link, from Ocarina of Time, that hides the entrance to a basement room housing the Master Sword. Nine stained-glass windows depict the Triforce, Ganon, and the six sages from Ocarina of Time. When Link takes the Master Sword, the castle and the land around it unfreeze. Enemies who were assaulting the castle at the time it was frozen reawaken, and attempt to stop Link from escaping. Additionally, this particular Hyrule Castle does not have the Castle Town from Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess in its immediate vicinity, and stands alone in the midst of the surrounding countryside.

In Four Swords Adventures, Hyrule Castle lies south of Death Mountain, and near the center of Hyrule. The interior is very similar to its A Link to the Past incarnation, while the exterior, as shown on the world map, is based on that in The Wind Waker.

Hyrule Castle also has a significant presence in The Minish Cap. To restore power in the magic sword broken by Vaati, Link must find four elemental artifacts, and imbue the blade with their essence at an Elemental Sanctuary, which can be found in the courtyard of Hyrule Castle. As the story progresses, Vaati disguises himself as the King of Hyrule, possessing control of its guards, and making it harder for Link to enter the castle. Toward the game's end, Vaati transforms the entire castle into Dark Hyrule Castle, which is much larger than normal Hyrule Castle, and filled with many traps and enemies. The normal castle does still possess the upper floors, but they are not shown as the door to them is locked until the transfiguration.

Hyrule Castle plays a central role in Twilight Princess, both geographically and within the storyline. Many of the game's more dramatic moments and plot twists take place within its walls. The structure itself is visible from almost any point in Hyrule, and its grounds and interior are far larger than in any previous Zelda game. The castle also serves as the game's final dungeon, and is possibly the largest dungeon of the game, in terms of sheer floor-space. Link first explores the outer sections, jumping from roof to roof as a wolf, then in his normal form, as the final dungeon. The castle appears to have been besieged by Ganondorf, Zant, or both in succession; there are large amounts of structural damage to the walls.

The castle appears largely concentric, with an outer wall with towers at six points, and a large, strong keep. The castle has four main wings on its ground level; the eastern wing is used by the Bublins in Ganondorf's army as a base camp, with many poorly-constructed towers and walls, which can be torn down by using a large boar to smash them. The western wing and southern wings appear largely intact, the player entering through the southern wing adorned with three towers of the Triforce. The western wing is the place where the player has a final duel with the Bublin leader, who gives Link the key to the keep after recognizing him as "the strongest". The castle also has a throne room with chandeliers, and a platform for the throne, which has been moved for the purposes of gameplay. The upper levels have modest hallways accessible by balcony. The causeway to two of the major six towers can be walked upon, but the towers cannot be explored. Finally, the keep is a long, winding tower, with a second, massive throne room at the top of the tower. The castle also has a hidden graveyard.

Kakariko VillageEdit

Kakariko Village (カカリコ村, Kakariko-mura) is a small, peaceful village that first appeared in A Link to the Past, and has since reappeared in Ocarina of Time, Four Swords Adventures, and Twilight Princess. Kakariko Village's geographical and historical situation changes in each game, but it retains some signature characteristics throughout all of its appearances. Its background music shares a basic motif (A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time feature similar arrangements, while Twilight Princess only employs brief quotes of the opening melody, the rest being a remix of the Dark World music), all the roofs of the houses are familiarly colored red, the town features a characteristic graveyard, and Cuccos roam the town.

In A Link to the Past, Kakariko Village is west of Hyrule Castle, north of the Desert of Mystery, south of the Lost Woods, and southwest of Death Mountain. Hoping to meet with the sage Sahasrahla, Link can inquire about him throughout the village, though guards are stationed to capture Link, accused of abducting Princess Zelda. Sahasrahla's presumed wife, however, informs Link that the elder has left for the region around Eastern Palace. Exploring the village anyway is still profitable; many side-quests are tied into the village. Later in the game, Link takes the Book of Mudora from the library to the south, though Link is not required to return to the village after clearing the Desert Palace until much later in the game, namely before Misery Mire. This is because Link must awaken the bird trapped within the weather vane in the village by playing the Flute. Once this bird is awakened, Link can use the Flute to warp about the Light World.

A thief named Blind used to have a permanent residence in the village, but by the time Link sees it, it has been abandoned. Blind is the boss of the fourth Dark World dungeon, Blind's Hideout. The Dark World equivalent of Kakariko Village is the "Village of Outcasts", overrun with thieves, gambling establishments, and Moblins. In the place of the weather vane of Kakariko is a demon statue, and several trees have the ability to talk.

The Kakariko Village of Ocarina of Time is located directly at the foot of the Death Mountain, in the north of Hyrule. Villagers there recall Impa, Zelda's nursemaid, opening the formerly Sheikah-exclusive village to the commoners of Hyrule. The villagers also claim that long ago, Impa drove out the Gerudos from the Kakariko area. Dominating the landscape is a windmill, which is used to draw water up from the village's well, the source of water for the villagers. Sheikah legend tells that Impa sealed a great evil in the bottom of the well. Later, when Link learns the Song of Storms as an adult, playing it can overwork the windmill, making it draw up all the water, and, in effect, dry up the well. Another legend tells that a wise man with an eye that could see the truth lived where the well is located now; thus, playing the Song of Storms opens up the well for exploration as a child to find this Lens of Truth.

In Link's adulthood, the great evil imprisoned in Kakariko's well escapes, setting fire to the village, and beating Link and Sheik considerably before retreating into the Shadow Temple, the entrance to which is found in the graveyard adjacent to the village. Impa then goes off to imprison the great evil again by going into the Shadow Temple, but seemingly fails. Link must rescue her by defeating this great evil, an invisible "Phantom Shadow Beast", Bongo Bongo. In defeating the monster, Link rescues and awakens Impa as the Sage of the Shadow Temple.

During the seven-year period of turmoil in Hyrule between Link's drawing of the Master Sword and his awakening, many residents of the capital fled to the village to escape persecution. Talon, the previous proprietor of Lon Lon Ranch, also goes to Kakariko Village when Ingo evicts him. Before Link pulls the Master Sword, it is revealed that Impa wanted the village to be constructed into a "true city", and hired carpenters to do so — however, when Link returns seven years later, the carpenters are gone, and only one building has been made.

In Four Swords Adventures, Kakariko Village is overrun by thieves, and large parts of it are on fire.

In Twilight Princess, Kakariko Village is a barren wasteland inside a canyon. When Link reaches the village, its inhabitants have all been killed, or turned into Twilight creatures, with the exceptions of Renado, the village shaman, his daughter Luda, and Barnes, the owner of a bomb shop. The houses that line the path to Death Mountain are uninhabited and in disrepair. After Link saves the possessed leader of the Goron tribe, Darbus, Gorons come down to the village and help Link reach higher areas of the valley by launching him into the air from their backs. It is also revealed through the Zora queen, Rutela, that the graveyard of the village is sacred to the Zora, because it is a place of peace for them. The graveyard is also where most Zoras of royal blood go to be buried. Like the Gorons, Zora come to the village after Link comes to their aid, though they spend most of their times in the inn's hot spring.

Lake HyliaEdit

Lake Hylia (ハイリア湖, Hairia-ko) is a large lake located in Hyrule. In most games, it is fed by a river which flows from a waterfall which flows from a mountain (usually Death Mountain).

In A Link to the Past, Lake Hylia is located in southeast Hyrule, and has a network of small caves coming off it. In the center of the lake is an island featuring a fairy pond inhabited by Venus, Queen of the Fairies, who upgrades Link's ability to carry bombs or arrows if given enough money. The lake itself is fed from Zora's River, which in turn flows from Death Mountain. The lake as it appears in this game resembles a maar.

In Ocarina of Time, Lake Hylia is a lake in the south of Hyrule, and is is fed by water from Zora's River. It is closed off by a gate which can be jumped over on horse back or ignored via a hidden ladder. There are numerous small islands in the lake linked by bridges, the largest containing the Water Temple. During the seven years of Link's sleep, Lake Hylia loses most of its water, due to the presence of Morpha inside the Water Temple. The water returns after Link slays Morpha, however. On the coast of the lake, there is a laboratory and access to a fishing pond.

Lake Hylia is the first level in Four Swords Adventures, and is located in the east of Hyrule. Unlike in other games, where Lake Hylia is a single body of water, this iteration is a series of small lakes connected by rivers.

In The Minish Cap, Lake Hylia is located in the east of Hyrule, and is sourced from Veil Falls, to the north. To the south is the Minish Woods, and to the west Lon Lon Ranch. The lake's most important feature is the Temple of Droplets, the fourth dungeon.

In Twilight Princess, Lake Hylia is one of the three major focal points of Lanayru Province. It is fed by Zora's River, which flows from Zora's Domain. Beneath the surface lies the Lakebed Temple, the motifs and location of which suggest it to be a renamed Water Temple. When Link first enters Lake Hylia in the Twilight Realm, it is almost completely drained of water, due to Zora's Domain being frozen over. On the southern edge of the lake lies the spring of the Light Spirit Lanayru. The Great Bridge of Hylia is the only way to cross Lake Hylia from Hyrule Field. The bridge connects with a rock islet. The lake itself, however, is noticeably deeper and larger than Ocarina of Time's, almost as large as Ocarina of Time's Hyrule Field, and is at the bottom of a large basin, which it barely fills halfway.

Lon Lon RanchEdit

Lon Lon Ranch (ロンロン牧場, Ron Ron Bokujō) is a ranch that appears in several games of the series.

In Ocarina of Time, Lon Lon Ranch is located in the center of Hyrule Field. The four main buildings are the house, the stables, the Cucco coop, and the storage shed. The ranch raises Cuccos, dairy cattle, and horses, including Epona. The interior of the ranch, which is the largest space, boasts a corral for training and raising the horses, where they also graze. The entire ranch is situated on a rocky plateau, and is protected by a high, wooden fence crowned by metal spires. The fence keeps out trespassers and intruders, while maintaining and protecting the livestock within.

When Link is a child, the ranch is owned by Talon and operated by him, his daughter Malon, and their hard-working ranch hand, Ingo. Seven years later, Link learns that Ganondorf has kicked Talon out, then transferred ownership of the ranch to Ingo. "The Fabulous Ingo's 'Ingo Ranch'" has actually prospered, but Malon is forced to work under Ingo, or else he will "treat the horses very badly." During Ganon's reign, Talon is forced to live elsewhere. Taking up residence in Kakariko Village, Talon copes with his depression over losing his daughter and ranch to Ingo by constantly sleeping.

When Link frees Epona and Malon from Ingo's holding, Talon returns home and promises to turn over a new leaf, and to "work hard from now on." Within days, Ingo mysteriously transforms into a nice person, and returns to work as a ranch hand. He and Talon befriend each other, and Malon's relationship with her father is restored and improved.

In Majora's Mask, Link finds Epona in a place called Romani Ranch, which is owned by two young women. One, Romani, looks like the child Malon in Ocarina of Time, and the other, Cremia, looks like the adult Malon. The music in the ranch is the same as the music in Lon Lon Ranch in Ocarina of Time, but without Malon's singing.

In The Minish Cap, Lon Lon Ranch remains much the same, but it is much smaller and only farms dairy cows. It is located to the east of Hyrule Town, instead of the center of Hyrule Field.

Lost WoodsEdit

File:LinkLostWoods.jpg
Silhouette of Link in the Lost Woods

The Lost Woods (迷いの森, Mayoi no Mori) is a large, maze-like forest.

In The Legend of Zelda, the Lost Woods is a single-screen, repeating area filled with trees. The path forms a cross. It requires a certain pattern of directions (north, west, south, west) in order for the player to pass through successfully. If the player does not know the correct pattern, they are unable to reach western Hyrule without crossing the river north of the large lake.

In A Link to the Past, the Lost Woods is located in the northwestern section of Hyrule, directly north of Kakariko Village. The Master Sword is placed in a large hidden shrine, though numerous fakes are also present. The dark shadows of the trees are also good growing conditions for the Sleepy Mushroom, which can be turned into Magic Powder. The Lost Woods is also inhabited by several thieves, who won't hesitate to rob passersby of their Rupees, should they come too close.

In Link's Awakening, the "Mysterious Forest" is found just north of the village of Mabe. Link's Awakening is set on Koholint Island rather than Hyrule, so these are not the same Lost Woods as are seen in other Zelda games, hence the name change. However, it is likely the forest was inspired by, and intended to remind players of, the Lost Woods.

In Ocarina of Time, the Lost Woods lies directly to the west and north of Kokiri Forest, and is inhabited by Skull Kids. It is a maze of trees that can be navigated by following the sound of Saria's Song. Taking a wrong path leads the player back to the entrance in Kokiri Forest. Portals to Goron City and Zora's River are hidden within the Lost Woods. Located in the northern portion of the woods is the Sacred Forest Meadow. This is the favorite haunt of Saria, Link's friend and the Forest Sage. It is also where the Forest Temple is hidden. According to local lore, whoever enters the forest will turn into a Stalfos (if Hylian) or a Skull Kid (if Kokiri). A Gossip Stone reveals that only Kokiri who have fairy partners may enter the forest and not become lost.

In Majora's Mask, the game begins in the Lost Woods, where Link is ambushed by the Skull Kid. The Terminan equivalent of the Lost Woods is the "Woods of Mystery", located in the Southern Swamp. As with Ocarina of Time, the player must take the correct path through the woods. If they go the wrong way, they are returned to the entrance of the woods. The Woods of Mystery featured a different path on each of the three days in the game's cycle. However, it was possible for a monkey to guide Link through the woods, should he ever need to reach the end. Unlike the Lost Woods from Ocarina of Time, the Woods of Mystery had a minor role in the story, as Link only had to explore the Woods of Mystery to help Koume and, optionally, look for mushrooms with the Mask of Scents.

In Oracle of Seasons, an area called the Lost Woods is the location of the Noble Sword, though it is obviously a different Lost Woods, seeing as the game is set in the land of Holodrum, not Hyrule.

The Lost Woods do not appear in The Wind Waker, as the forest was submerged when the gods flooded Hyrule. Instead, the "Forbidden Woods" appear — however, it is a dungeon, rather than a labyrinth-like overworld area. Early in the game, a Korok also mentions that his race had lived there in the past, until it became overrun by monsters, and they were forced to leave. The boss creature of the dungeon is a plant-monster named Kalle Demos. Also, as mentioned in the Death Mountain section, the map loosely resembles that of Ocarina of Time; the Forbidden Woods are in the southeastern area, much like the map in Ocarina of Time.

The Lost Woods do not appear in The Minish Cap. Instead, a place called "Minish Woods" exists adjacent to Lake Hylia.

The Lost Woods do not appear in Twilight Princess either, but the "Sacred Grove" shares its convoluted design and lack of a mini-map, making it easy to confuse players, and the music is similar to Ocarina of Time's Lost Woods. It is also the residence of a Skull Kid, along with the ruins of a Temple of Time. Link also finds the Master Sword in a forest clearing within the ruins of the temple, which resembles the area in the Lost Woods where the Master Sword was found in A Link to the Past.

By gameEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

File:Zelda1Overworld.png
A map of Hyrule in The Legend of Zelda
Physical geographyEdit

In the first game, The Legend of Zelda, Death Mountain is located in the north, and the major body of water is in the center of the land, the Lost Woods are in the southwest, a graveyard is in the far west, and some desert regions are in the northeast. A large portion of the map in the southeast is forested, and there are no obvious plains. The reason there are no towns is because Ganon's creatures have swept the land, ravaging the southern region of the kingdom, with the approximate site of the graveyard roughly geographically corresponding to the location of Kakariko Village in A Link to the Past. In Hyrulean legends, it is said that once Ganon's army invaded, all the settlements and people moved north, beyond Death Mountain, as seen in The Adventure of Link. Many towns exist in the north of Hyrule in the game, with the North Castle being where the royalty resides.

Human geographyEdit

In this area, there is no Hyrule Castle, and all the people Link encounters are elderly, and live in caves or dungeons. In The Adventure of Link, which occurs immediately afterward chronologically, towns were introduced to the series for the first time.

Races and governmentsEdit

The only friendly creatures encountered in The Legend of Zelda are humans, in the form of old men, old women, and shopkeepers. There is a race known as the Zola, which was a mistranslation of the "Zora" race in many other Zelda games, but in this game they are only portrayed as enemies.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

File:180px-Zelda2 west continent.png
A map of the Western Continent of Hyrule during The Adventure of Link

The Adventure of Link takes place north of the locations of The Legend of Zelda. The expanded Hyrule is divided by sea into two main continents (called the Eastern and Western Continents), and supports at least eight towns. Five of the towns bear the same names of sages from Ocarina of Time (Rauru, Ruto, Saria, Nabooru, and Darunia). Another town, Mido, shares the name of a bossy character in Ocarina of Time's Kokiri Forest.

A Link to the PastEdit

File:LttPMap.jpg
A map of Hyrule in A Link to the Past

In A Link to the Past, Hyrule's geography has changed once again. Death Mountain is still on the northern border of Hyrule, with the Lost Woods at its base in the northwest and Zora's River at its base in the northeast. This was the first The Legend of Zelda game to feature Hyrule Castle, which lies in the central fields of the kingdom. Lake Hylia is located in the southeast border of the map, and the Desert of Mystery covers the southwestern corner, with the Great Swamp between them. The main human settlement of Hyrule is Kakariko Village, surrounded by forest on the western side of Hyrule.

There are three prominent temples spread across this Hyrule. The Eastern Palace lies on the far eastern border of Hyrule, north of Lake Hylia, the Desert Palace lies deep in the Desert of Mystery, and the Tower of Hera stands atop the highest peaks of Death Mountain. Each of these temples holds one of the sacred Pendants. There is also a Haunted Grove south-west of the castle where the Flute Boy plays his instrument, and a Sacred Grove deep in the Lost Woods where the Master Sword is hidden.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Physical geographyEdit

The land of Hyrule in the time of Ocarina of Time is very diverse. The landscape is dominated by a large volcanic mountain range and its principal volcano, Death Mountain, in the northeast of the country. To the far west is a large area of desert, known as the Haunted Wasteland, bordered by a canyon, named Gerudo Valley that is a feeder river for a large lake, Lake Hylia in the southwest. Immediately east of Lake Hylia is a large woodland area, known as the Lost Woods. The major water source in Hyrule is the Zora's River, which flows in almost a circle, starting at at Zora's Fountain, forking into Hyrule Castle Town, and into the Lost Woods, where part of the river can be seen in Kokiri Forest. It then flows from Hyrule Castle Town, through Gerudo Valley and into Lake Hylia. The center region of the country is occupied by Hyrule Field, with a hill at its center, on which Lon Lon Ranch is located.

File:Hyrule.gif
A map of Hyrule in Ocarina of Time
Political geographyEdit

Human activity in Hyrule has been somewhat limited. There is evidence of farming, by the Magic Beans of Ocarina of Time, though the bean salesman says they aren't selling very well. The Hyrulian economy, judging from the state of Hyrule Castle, seems fairly strong, but dependent on fisheries and trade.

Several settlements have sprung up around Hyrule, the capital generally being based around Hyrule Castle, with other major settlements such as Kakariko Village and various settlements created by races such as the Gorons, Zoras, Gerudo, Kokiri, and others. The Gorons are known to be secluded, and separated from the rest of Hyrule, being high atop Death Mountain, and unreachable by many citizens; the Gerudo people of Ocarina of Time bar access to their settlement, the only entrance to them being a single rope bridge spanning a deep valley, and the Zora only allow entry to their domain by those serving the Royal Family. The Kokiri hold beliefs forbidding them from leaving the forest, and strangers who enter are cursed by the woods into becoming monsters. Some major buildings in Hyrule include Hyrule Castle and the Temple of Time.

The Wind Waker and Phantom HourglassEdit

By the time of The Wind Waker in the series' mythos, Hyrule has been flooded by a deluge, and has become the Great Sea. Only a collection of mountaintops are still visible above the water, and these form the 65 islands and archipelagos of the Great Sea. The largest of these are Outset Island, Windfall Island, the Forest Haven, the Forsaken Fortress, Mercay Island, Molida Island, and the Isle of Ruins. Some of these islands are references to locations in the Hyrule of other parts of the series, and bear similarities to these places in their locations, cultures and inhabitants.[7] Due to the relatively small size of many of the islands, there are large expanses of ocean between each island, making travel time-consuming until alternate means of travel can be obtained.

Due to the vast nature of the sea, most navigation requires the use of charts. Both The Wind Waker and Phantom Hourglass have a main Sea Chart which maps the entire area of the Great Sea playable in that game, though neither of them are initially filled in; The Wind Waker requires Link to find and feed Fishmen, who will fill out one of the 49 sections in return (though this is not required to progress in the game), while Phantom Hourglass forces Link to obtain the four sections of its chart by exploring the Temple of the Ocean King. This is a main part of the storyline, as unlike The Wind Waker, these areas can not be explored without the corresponding section of the Sea Chart.

There are also various other charts that Link may find as treasure, or through side-quests, that reveal the locations of sunken treasure or important areas.

Twilight PrincessEdit

File:Hyrule2.png
A map of Hyrule in the Nintendo GameCube version of Twilight Princess. The map on the Wii version is a mirror image.

In Twilight Princess, many locations are carried over from Ocarina of Time and other games, although they have been completely redone. Hyrule Castle and Hyrule Castle Town now sit in the middle of the map, surrounded by Hyrule Field, which has been broken up into multiple locations. In addition, the kingdom has now been divided into six political provinces, four of which have been named after their respective light spirits (who have names similar to the goddesses in Ocarina of Time). Other locations include Kakariko Village and Death Mountain, in the Eldin Province, to the east, Ordon Village and Faron Woods, in the Ordona and Faron Provinces respectively, to the south, Zora's Domain to the north, and Lake Hylia, Gerudo Desert and Snowpeak to the west (all locations are mirrored on the Wii version). The Ordona Province is referred to as an annex, and some still refer to it as neighbouring region that is not part of Hyrule itself.

Zora's River (most of which is only accessible during minigames) runs from Zora's Domain to Lake Hylia through a very deep gorge that partially surrounds the eastern section of Hyrule Field. Lake Hylia itself lies far below the western section of Hyrule Field. Notably, Lon Lon Ranch is absent from this game, and the Temple of Time, which, in Ocarina of Time, was located in Hyrule Castle Town to the north, is now found in ruins in the Faron Woods to the south of the map.

For control reasons, the east and west directions in the GameCube and Wii versions of the game are inverted, as the Wii version of the game was mirrored from the original GameCube version. As a result, the Wii version had a considerably altered geographic location of many landmarks in the game (in comparison to previous games).

ReferencesEdit

  1. Template:Cite video game
  2. A Link to the Past, Japanese Manual: In books left behind for their Hyrulian descendants by the race once closest to the gods, the Hylians (the root word for Hyrule), it is written that the three gods, the "god of power", the "god of wisdom," and the "god of courage," created the state of heaven and earth. (かつて神に最も近い民 族とされたハイリア人(ハイラルの語源でもあります)が、ハイラルの子孫に残した書物の中に三人の神々「力の神」「知恵の神」「勇気の神」による天地創造の様子が書かれています。)
  3. Omniglot.com Ocarina of Time Hylian. Obtained May 28, 2007.
  4. IGN.com Article on Hylian. Obtained May 28, 2007.
  5. Omniglot.com The Wind Waker Hylian. Obtained May 28, 2007.
  6. Omniglot.com Twilight Princess Hylian. Obtained May 28, 2007.
  7. For example, Dragon Roost Island is in the same general area as Death Mountain Crater in Ocarina of Time, and both are large volcanoes that grow the only Bomb Flowers in the overworld.



Locations/Hyrule Castle

Hyrule Castle (ハイラル城, Hairaru-jō) is the home of the royal family of Hyrule, a mythical land in The Legend of Zelda games. The castle first appears in A Link to the Past, the third in the series. Each game that contains a Hyrule Castle either features a different layout, or denies the player access to parts that are available in other games. There are grounds for speculation that the castle is actually a different castle in each game, or that it is the same castle but was changed in each game for aesthetic or gameplay purposes.

Though the appearance and architecture of Hyrule Castle vary somewhat, several aspects have remained consistent throughout multiple Legend of Zelda titles. For one, it has consistently sported the appearance of a generic European castle. In most of the more recent Legend of Zelda titles, Hyrule Castle is portrayed as a white (and sometimes gray) castle with tall, angular spires and green or purple rooftops, as can be seen in the various pictures below.

Game appearancesEdit

Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda

Though there is no actual "Hyrule Castle" in this game, the central location of the fourth dungeon, along with its moat-like surroundings has led to speculation that it may be the ruins of Hyrule Castle.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

Main page: Zelda II: The Adventure of Link

Again, no formal Hyrule Castle is seen in this game, but its equivalent is generally thought to be the North Castle, the resting place of Princess Zelda. Though it does not appear to be at the same central location as the true Hyrule Castles, it is the only "friendly" palace in the game and is surrounded by the traditional moat.

A Link to the PastEdit

File:Hyrule Castle courtyard in A Link to the Past.png
Screenshot of Hyrule Castle courtyard in the World of Light in A Link to the Past.
Main page: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

The third game in the series was the first to name a location Hyrule Castle. It is situated in the middle of Hyrule and appears to be the seat of power of the government as well as the home of Princess Zelda. During the course of the game, Link must break into the castle. He manages to gain entrance via a secret passage on the eastern side of the castle. It has a total of six floors and features a courtyard and moat. There is also a secret passage within that leads to a sanctuary north of the castle.

In the Dark World/Golden Land, Hyrule Castle becomes the Pyramid of Power where Ganon received the Triforce.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

The castle is first seen during the opening credits. The castle is situated west of Death Mountain and just directly north of Hyrule Castle Town. The entrance to Hyrule Castle Town alone is protected by a moat and a drawbridge which lowers only during the day. Beyond Hyrule Castle Town is a path which leads eventually to Hyrule Castle, but features a gate and several guards along the way. In order to infiltrate the castle, Link must sneak past each guard until he gets to the castle itself, surrounded by a moat. Link never directly enters any "important" parts of the castle, but he does manage to enter the courtyard (where he meets Zelda) using a secret entrance on the east side (similar to his infiltration in A Link to the Past). Hyrule Castle is later destroyed and replaced by Ganon's Castle.

File:OoT Hyrule Castle.png
The castle itself, as it appeared in Ocarina of Time, stands on a hilltop and has a small moat (not visible from the angle this image was taken).

The castle and its surrounding area is the arguably most prominent and important place in the game, housing the Temple of Time, a town, many of the game's plot twists, and the game's final bosses, Ganon and Ganondorf. Surrounded by a small village, drawbridge, and moat, it models the stereotypical monarchial or feudalist castle. The king of Hyrule is never seen in the game, although Ganondorf is seen inside the castle at one point, apparently pledging allegiance to the King. The Castles defences are relatively minimal, as it is designed more as a residence then as a fortress, and due to the long peace that Hyrule had enjoyed, large levels of security where generally un-needed. Unfortunatly this made Ganondorfs "coup" relatively simple, with the castle surrendering shortly after it was attacked.

Most of the castle is never seen or explored. The extensive castle gardens and the castle courtyard are the only areas available to explore. The castle courtyard serves several purposes, both as introducing the characters of Princess Zelda and Impa, and as a staging point for embarking on the next series of quests. One curious feature of the courtyard is the paintings of several Nintendo characters, including Mario and Yoshi, as can be seen through one window.

The Beta Quest, a game mode unlockable through usage of a Gameshark, reveals the complete Triforce hidden under the courtyard. This find, although not an answer to obtaining the Triforce sought by gamers, was an interesting twist to players' understanding of the game's original intent to make the Triforce an obtainable item.

File:Hyrule Castle Four Swords Adventures.jpg
Hyrule Castle from Four Swords Adventures.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures

Hyrule Castle lies just south of Death Mountain, somewhat near the center of Hyrule (seemingly a combination of its locations in A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time).

The interior is very similar to its A Link to the Past incarnation, while the exterior (shown) is based on that in The Wind Waker.

The Minish CapEdit

File:Hyrulecastle minishcap.png
Screenshot of Hyrule Castle in The Minish Cap.
Main page: The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap

Hyrule Castle has a fairly large presence in the game. To restore power in the magic sword broken by Vaati, Link must find four elemental artifacts and imbue the blade with their essence at an Elemental Sanctuary, which can be found in Hyrule Castle. As the story progresses, Vaati disguises himself as the king, making getting into the Elemental Sanctuary more difficult, requiring some stealth to make it in successfully. Finally, toward the game's completion, Vaati transforms the entire castle into Dark Hyrule Castle, which is much larger than normal Hyrule Castle and is by far the most difficult dungeon in the game.

The Wind WakerEdit

Hyrule Castle, at first frozen in time, is situated under the Great Sea and accessible at the site of the Tower of the Gods. Only the main hall, which contains a secret passage to a room where the Master Sword is found, and a small courtyard may be visited. When Link takes the Master Sword, the castle and the land around it unfreezes. Enemies who were assaulting the castle at the time it was frozen reawaken and must be defeated. As time continues in the game, an area outside the castle is made accessible for Link to explore. In the basement room housing the Master Sword, 9 stained glass windows depict the Triforce, Ganondorf, and the six sages from Ocarina of Time. The music played in this Hyrule castle can be heard again in Twilight Princess, in the flashback of Zant attacking the castle.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Hyrule Castle plays a central role in Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, both geographically and plot-wise. Located in the center of Lanayru Province, many of the game's more dramatic moments and plot twists take place within its walls. The structure itself is visible from almost any point in Hyrule, and its grounds and interior are far larger than in any previous Zelda game. The castle also serves as the game's final dungeon, and is possibly the largest dungeon of the game in terms of sheer floor space, although it is a relatively short dungeon compared to the rest. In this dungeon, a small contingent of ghosts appear when Link's heightened wolf senses are used to help Link on certain puzzles-in one room, they point to a painting that must be shot with a bomb arrow; in another, Link must follow the pointing fingers of Hyrule's undead elite, as deviating from the path they indicate places link on floors that will drop out from under him.

After transforming into a wolf, Link is thrown into the castle dungeon, but escapes with Midna to Princess Zelda's chamber, where Zelda explains the castle was overrun by twilight creatures led by Zant. Later in the game, a force field surrounds the castle. At the end of the game, the true nature of the force field is explained. Ganondorf has returned to Hyrule and captured the castle. The final fight with Ganondorf partly takes place in the throne room of the castle, where the first two phases of the battle are fought--Ganondorf first possesses Zelda, but Link is able to defeat him without harming her. Ganondorf then takes the form of a raging boar. After Ganon's exterior form is destroyed, his "spirit" battles Midna, and as a result, the castle seemingly explodes. Ganondorf survives, reforms himself into his true Gerudo form, and the rest of the battle takes place in Hyrule Field.

While it appears to be destroyed in a cutscene near the end of the game, it is seen intact in the credit sequence, possibly rebuilt or restored by the light spirits. The Hyrule Castle throne room itself is seen in pristine condition.

Breath of the WildEdit

Hyrule Castle lies in ruins in the Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

Super Smash Bros.Edit

Hyrule Castle also appears as an arena in Super Smash Bros., but not in the sequel, Super Smash Bros. Melee, where it was replaced by Hyrule Temple. The Hyrule Castle in Super Smash Bros. is the one present in Ocarina of Time, which at the time was the latest The Legend of Zelda game. The Hyrule Temple in Melee is seemingly based off of the general layout of the temple dungeons in The Adventure of Link, including what could be an "elevator" at the bottom.



Locations/Kakariko Village

Kakariko Village (カカリコ村, Kakariko-mura) is a fictional village in the Legend of Zelda series. It first appeared in The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, but it has since reappeared in The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures,The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, and remakes thereof. It may have been inspired by various towns in Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, and in turn may have served as the inspiration for such future towns of the series — Mabe Village, Clock Town, Lynna City, Horon Village, Windfall Island, Hyrule Town, and various minor villages (for example, Symmetry City). Kakariko Village's geographical and historical situation seems to change in each game, and so many fans assert that these villages are not the same, but merely share the same name. However, it retains some signature characteristics throughout all of its appearances. Its background music shares a basic motif (A Link to the Past and Ocarina of Time feature similar arrangements, while Twilight Princess only employs brief quotes of the opening melody), all the roofs of the houses are familiarly colored red, and Cuccos roam the town.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, protagonist Link first visits Kakariko Village, which is west of Hyrule Castle, north of the Desert of Mystery, south of the Lost Woods, and southwest of Death Mountain Foothills, on the advice of the monk working at the Sanctuary. Hoping to meet with reputed sage Sahasrahla, Link can inquire about the local celebrity throughout the village, though guards are stationed all around (or in the vicinity) to capture Link, accused of abducting Princess Zelda. Sahasrahla's presumed wife, however, informs Link that the wise elder has left for the region around Eastern Palace. Exploring the village anyway is still profitable; many side quests are tied into the village. Later in the game, Link takes the Book of Mudora from the library to the south, though Link is not required to return to the village after clearing the Desert Palace until much later in the game — before Misery Mire. This is because Link must awaken the bird trapped within the weather vane in the village by playing the Flute (which is given to him by the son of a villager in the Haunted Grove section of the Dark World). Once this bird is awakened, Link can use the Flute to warp about the Light World. Kakariko Village is the third of the eight warp sites.

As stated before, Kakariko Village is south of Lost Woods, which is notorious for the thieves who reside there, and so it's not surprising that one thief, Blind, had a permanent residence in the village. By the time Link sees it, it has been abandoned, though treasures can still be found within. Blind turns out to be boss of the fourth Dark World dungeon, Blind's Hideout (notably, Blind's allegiance to Ganon seems to imply that the Lost Woods thieves are related to the Gerudo, though this is not the case in later games). Blind's Hideout is called "Thieves' Town" in the GBA remake.

The Dark World equivalent of Kakariko Village is the Village of Outcasts, overrun with thieves, gambling establishments, and Moblins. The weather vane has been replaced by a demon statue, and several trees now talk. One shop begins selling Good Bees (called Golden Bees in the remake) if Link shows the merchant there one from the ice cave in northeastern Lake Hylia (Light World). The Good/Golden Bee could be unleashed to attack enemies on the screen.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Kakariko Village of Ocarina of Time is radically different from the village of A Link to the Past. Now located directly at the foot of the Death Mountain, quite distant from the Lost Woods and the Haunted Wasteland (the Ocarina of Time equivalent of the Desert of Mystery), Kakariko Village seems to have been founded recently. Villagers there recall that Impa, Zelda's nursemaid, opened the formerly Sheikah-exclusive village to the poor commoners of Hyrule (presumably not rich enough to live in the Market outside Hyrule Castle). The villagers also claim that long ago, Impa drove out the Gerudos from the Kakariko area. Dominating the landscape is a windmill, which is used to draw water up from the Well of Three Features (Dark! Narrow! Scary!), the source of water for the villagers. Sheikah legend tells that Impa sealed a great evil in the Bottom of the Well. Later, when Link learns the Song of Storms as an adult, playing it can overwork the windmill, making it draw up all the water and in effect dry up the well. Another legend tells that a wise man with an eye that could see the truth lived where the well is located now; thus, playing the Song of Storms opens up the well for exploration as a child to find this Lens of Truth.

In Link's adulthood, the great evil imprisoned in the Well of Three Features escapes, setting fire to the village and beating Link and Sheik considerably before retreating into the Shadow Temple, the entrance to which is found in the Graveyard adjoined to the village. Impa then goes off to imprison the great evil again, but seemingly fails. Link must rescue her by defeating this great evil, which turns out to be an invisible "Phantom Shadow Beast," Bongo Bongo. Link uses the Lens of Truth to see the monster and slash its vulnerable eye. In defeating the monster, Link rescues and awakens Impa as the Sage of the Shadow Temple.

During the seven-year period of turmoil in Hyrule between Link's drawing of the Master Sword and his awakening, many residents of the Market fled to the village to escape persecution. Although not in the game itself, the ReDead trophy in Super Smash Bros. Melee states that no residents of the Market died. Talon, the previous proprietor of Lon Lon Ranch, also runs off to Kakariko Village when Ingo kicks him out. Before Link pulls the Master Sword, it is revealed that Impa wanted the village to be constructed into a "true city," and hired carpenters to do so, however, when Link returns seven long years later, the carpenters are gone and only one building has been made, which becomes the new Hyrule Shooting Gallery.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

Kakariko Village is the setting of a level in The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures. The village is overrun by thieves, and covered in fire. The four Links are required to capture them in order to advance north of the city, to a place where they can summon rain and thus quell the fire started by the antagonist Shadow Link. Here Kakariko Village has no prominent features and is simply a collection of houses with a few residents. A stream outside the city leads the Links to fight a Stalfos, and in so doing recover the Green Royal Jewel. The numerous thieves present could relate to the Village of Outcasts in A Link to the Past, and the vast Cucco population may also relate to the amount of Cuccos present in Kakariko Village in Ocarina of Time. The fact that Kakariko Village is nearer to The Lost Woods may also account for the presence of thieves in the village.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess, Kakariko Village has greatly changed since its last appearance. Instead of having green grass and a surplus of people, it has changed to a barren wasteland inside a canyon. By the time Link reaches the village, its inhabitants have all been killed or turned into twilight creatures, with the exceptions of Renado, the village shaman, his daughter Luda and Barnes, the owner of a bomb shop. The houses that line the path to Death Mountain are uninhabited and in severe disrepair, perhaps due to the attack of the twilight monsters. After Link saves the possessed leader of the Goron tribe, Darbus, Gorons will come down to the village and help Link reach higher areas of the valley by launching him with their backs. It is also revealed through the Zora queen, Rutela, that the graveyard of the village is sacred to the Zora, because it is a place of peace for them. The graveyard is also where most Zoras of royal blood go to be buried.

It is theorized that the Hidden Village is the original Kakariko Village, because not only was it founded by a member of an ancient race who served the royal family (presumably Impa, whose name is similar to that of the lady who lives in the Hidden Village, Impaz), but also because one of the billboards in the village, when translated, reads "Welcome to Old Kakariko". However, the town that is actually named Kakariko Village in this game shares several features with the one from Ocarina of Time, especially the presence of a graveyard and its proximity to Death Mountain.

TriviaEdit

  • The village was renamed "Cocorico" in France to match with the French interpretation of a cock's "Cock-a-doodle-doo", because of the chicken-like Cuccos which are a constant characteristic of the village throughout the series. Other languages usually kept the name "Kakariko".



Locations/Lake Hylia

Lake Hylia is the name of a fictional area in the Zelda series. In most games, the lake is fed by a river which flows from a waterfall which flows from a mountain (usually Death Mountain).

Appearances in the SeriesEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Though it is never officially named in The Legend of Zelda, many fans of the series theorize that the lake in central Hyrule on which Level 1 and Level 4 are located is Lake Hylia. This is due in part to its resemblance to Lake Hylia in other games. Though the area around the lake is inhabited by various creatures, the lake itself seems to be inhabited solely by Zoras.

The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past Lake Hylia is in southeast Hyrule and has small caves coming off it. In the center of the lake is an island featuring a fairy pond that is inhabited by Venus, Queen of the Fairies, who will upgrade your ability to carry bombs or arrows if you give her enough money. Outside the pond is a warp tile that grants access to the Ice Palace in the Dark World. In addition, the Ice Rod is found in a cave in the northeast, as is the Good/Golden Bee, a bottled insect that can be unleashed to attack foes.

The lake itself is fed from Zora's River, which in turn flows from Death Mountain.

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Lake Hylia is a lake in the south of Hyrule, towards the west. It is closed off by a gate but can be entered on Epona or by scaling a ladder hidden behind one gate pillar. There is also portal from Zora's Domain and it is possible to float down river from Gerudo Valley. Lake Hylia is fed by water from Zora's River. There are numerous small islands in the lake linked by bridges. The largest island is the warp point for the Serenade of Water and below it lies in the Water Temple. During the seven years of Link's sleep, Lake Hylia loses most of its water due to the boss of the Water Temple, Morpha. Also in Lake Hylia, there is a laboratory and a fishing pond.

Four Swords AdventuresEdit

Lake Hylia is the first level in Four Swords Adventures. It is located in the east of Hyrule. Unlike in the previous games where Lake Hylia is one massive lake, Lake Hylia in Four Swords Adventures is a series of small lakes connected by rivers.

The Legend of Zelda: The Minish CapEdit

In The Minish Cap, Lake Hylia is located in the east of Hyrule. The water enters the Lake by river from Veil Falls to the north. To the south is the Minish Woods, and to the west Lon Lon Ranch. Stockwell, the shop-owner from Hyrule Town, owns property here, and his dog Fifi lives there. Librari, the Minish elder of the library, The Lake's most important feature is the Temple of Droplets, the fourth dungeon (a Minish-sized one).

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight PrincessEdit

Lake Hylia returns in Twilight Princess, being one of the three major focus points of Lanayru Province. Lake Hylia is fed by Zora's River, flowing out of the waterfalls in Zora's Domain. Beneath the surface of the lake lies the Lakebed Temple. When Link first encounters Lake Hylia in the Twilight Realm, it is almost completely drained of water due to Zora's Domain being frozen over. On the edge of the lake lies the spring of the Light spirit Lanayru.

The Great Bridge of Hylia is the only way to cross Lake Hylia from Hyrule Field. It is possible that the gigantic tree on the south side of the Great Bridge of Hylia is the same tree on the island above Water Temple in Ocarina of Time; this would suggest centuries of erosion drove the lakebed deeper and deeper into a chasm until it was far below the rest of Hyrule, also explaining the Gorges around Zora's River and it's tributaries. It looks like the entrance to Lanayru's shrine may have been the Ocarina of Time Water Temple entrance.

GeologyEdit

Though Lake Hylia in A Link to the Past is a fictional lake, aspects about it suggest it is a maar lake, a kind of volcanic cone. The evident details include:

  • Hyrule has other volcanic activity nearby, such as Death Mountain, establishing volcanism in the area.
  • The lake is small, round and very deep, typical of a bowl-shaped maar.
  • Some of the lake edges are surrounded with steep walls, typical of maar formations, formed by a maar's initial bowl-shaping eruption.
  • The lake's faerie spring island could conceivably be a man-made (or faerie-made) degassing pump, to prevent carbon dioxide from oversaturating the lake water. Such pumps work to fountain water from the bottom of the lake to the top, expelling excess gas before it can build up at the bottom. Though real degassing pumps (such as at Lake Nyos) are fountains that spray water from the lake bottom up into the air, the noted absence of a fountain at Lake Hylia could mean either that:
    • The maar is inactive. Considering Ocarina of Time and the presence of fish in Lake Hylia, this is likely.
    • The faerie spring decarbonates the water and releases the gas into the air. This is less likely, as carbon dioxide sinks in atmosphere, and would blanket the surrounding ground and lake surface with a thin layer of unbreathable air. Swimming would be impossible. This assumes that the faerie spring doesn't teleport the gas to a separate location.

It is not known whether Lake Hylia is or was ever intended to be a maar or not. For comparison, see Lake Nyos, an active maar in Cameroon with many similarities to Lake Hylia.



Locations/Death Mountain

Death Mountain (Japanese: デスマウンテン, Desu-Maunten) is a fictional mountain (occasionally a volcano as well), located in the fictional land of Hyrule in The Legend of Zelda series of video games. Its first appearance was in the original The Legend of Zelda video game for the Famicom Disk System and has subsequently appeared in several games in the series.
Spoiler warning: Plot and/or ending details follow.

Based on the events detailed in The Wind Waker, it is possible that Death Mountain is in fact two different locations: one being the volcano shown in Ocarina of Time and the other being the mountain that appears in the games that fall later in series chronology. However, the continued existence of Spectacle Rock is a point against such a theory, as is the return of the Master Sword, and Ganon from the bottom of the Great Sea, which would suggest that Hyrule is in fact the same location, and the Sea drains at some point, thus, Death Mountain remaining the same Mountain or Mountain Range.

Characteristics of Death MountainEdit

Death Mountain is one of the most important and memorable locations in the Zelda series. Certain things stand out about it.

When viewed from afar, (as seen in Ocarina of Time) Death Mountain appears as an ominous volcano with a ring of smoke surrounding its peak. It is said that the ring of smoke reflects the state of affairs at the mount: when all is peaceful, the ring is white and calm, but when things go awry, it turns violently ashen and seemingly aflame.

Atop the mountain, a large rock formation exists known as Spectacle Rock. In The Legend of Zelda, Spectacle Rock was the entrance to Ganon's lair, and was heavily guarded. In A Link to the Past, it blocks the way to the Tower of Hera. Spectacle Rock was also accessible in Ocarina of Time, inside the crater of Death Mountain. However, it could only be reached using a magic bean plant as Adult Link. It is evident by its structure that the Fire Temple, which was built into the bedrock of the mountain and is accessible within the crater, extends in its fourth and fifth levels into each of the two peaks of Spectacle Rock. One of the rocks has a heart piece on top, but other than that they hold little importance. It may be possible that in Legend of Zelda, the Fire Temple becomes converted into Ganon's main base, "Level 9."

Death Mountain, in all of its appearances, is riddled with caves and dungeons, from Goron City and Dodongo's Cavern in Ocarina of Time to Ganon's lair in The Legend of Zelda.

Climbing the mountain, one is certain to encounter a large number of Tektites, as well as Lynels. To make matters worse, boulders constantly fall from the mountain onto any potential climbers.

Death Mountain is also traditionally the home of the Gorons. They first appeared as an enemy in A Link to the Past which would turn to stone when attacked; they were later fleshed out as a sentient race and given a city inside the mountain in Ocarina of Time.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

In The Legend of Zelda, Death Mountain is an area in the first game occupying much of the northwestern part of the map. It contains some of the most difficult enemies in the game, and is also where the player will discover Levels 6 and 9. Level 9, Ganon's lair and the final level in the game, is discovered by bombing a portion of Spectacle Rock, and even then is only accessible when completing all other levels and assembling the Triforce. Death Mountain is inhabited by Tektites, Lynels, and falling rocks. There is a lake on the east end which flows into a waterfall, which in turns flows into a river which flows into Lake Hylia. The Lost Hills are located directly east of the Death Mountain area.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

In Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, Death Mountain is in the southwest portion of the map. This area consists of a maze of caves. The proper exit of the maze leads the player to an area similar to the overworld of The Legend of Zelda. Here, Spectacle Rock makes a second appearance in the series.

A Link to the PastEdit

In A Link to the Past, Death Mountain is the area which occupies much of the upper area of the map in this game. It is location of Hera's Tower in the Light World, and Ganon's Tower and Turtle Rock in the Dark World. It's inhabited by Tektites, Lynels, and falling rocks. When first visiting the mountain, Link encounters a lost old man in the cave system leading to the area. After guiding him through the paths, the old man will heal Link when he visits.

Spectacle Rock makes another appearance in this version of Death Mountain.

Though no lake is actually seen on Death Mountain itself, there is a waterfall in the northeastern corner of Hyrule which, judging from its position, most likely comes from a body of water on Death Mountain. The waterfall flows into a river which flows into Lake Hylia, possibly a throwback to The Legend of Zelda.

The Japanese game refers only to the Dark World mountains as Death Mountain, calling the ones in the Light World Hebra Mountain instead. This has never happened in any later Zelda games, so it is assumed the change during translation was deliberate and intended by the creators.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

In Ocarina of Time, Death Mountain is a volcano located in the far Northeast reaches of the country. The Fire Temple is located inside the Death Mountain Crater, where Link must kill Volvagia, an old dragon that once was destroyed by the ancestral hero of the Goron people. Spectacle Rock also appears inside the Death Mountain Crater.

The Goron race occupies Death Mountain inside a cave network with four levels called Goron City. Their staple supply of rock (for nourishment) comes from Dodongo's Cavern, which in the time just before Ganondorf's invasion had been overrun by the extinct race of Dodongos and the mighty King Dodongo.

Beyond Goron City, Death Mountain can be climbed, although Tektites and falling rocks will impede Link's path. Along with an entrance to Death Mountain Crater, a Great Fairy's Fountain is hidden at the summit; the Great Fairy there grants Link his magic power. Inside the crater is a second Great Fairy's Fountain where Link's magic meter can be doubled.

Twilight PrincessEdit

In Twilight Princess, Death Mountain is a volcano once again, located close to Kakariko Village. Below the enormous mountain lies Spectacle Rock (as north as the player can get in the Death Mountain area). Spectacle Rock is the home of the Goron race, and also houses their Goron Mines. Lava flows inside, and there is a hot spring located behind Spectacle Rock itself. Subsequently Link is not able to enter the mine at first, but as the story progresses, Gor Coron, a Goron elder temporarily ruling in the patriarch's stead, will allow Link to enter after defeating him at sumo wrestling, to search for their possessed leader Darbus. The entrance to Ocarina of Time's Dodongo's Cavern can be seen in the distance if the camera is faced north-west.

Other Death MountainsEdit

There also appear to be places named Death Mountain in Labrynna, Holodrum and Koholint Island. This could perhaps indicate that at sometime all these islands were a part of some shared landmass. In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, Dragon Roost Island is speculated to be part of Death Mountain, due to being a volcano, having Bomb Flowers, and being surrounded by a smoke ring very similar to the one in Ocarina of Time when you first see it.



Locations/Great Sea

The Great Sea is the setting of the Nintendo GameCube video game The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, and its Nintendo DS sequel, The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass.

Physical geographyEdit

By the time of The Wind Waker in Zelda's (i.e. Hyrule's) chronology, Hyrule has been sealed beneath the ocean, and only a collection of mountaintops are visible above the water. These mountaintops form the islands and archipelagos of the Great Sea. There are 49 islands and archipelagos in all, the largest of which are Outset Island, Dragon Roost Island, Windfall Island, Forest Haven and the Forsaken Fortress, which is one of the game's major dungeons. Some of these islands are references to places in the Hyrule of Ocarina of Time and bear similarities to these places in their locations, cultures and inhabitants. Due to the relatively small size of many of the islands, there are large expanses of ocean between each island, making travel long and tedious until alternate means of travel can be obtained (as opposed to manually sailing between destinations.)

Human geographyEdit

On the islands of the Great Sea, local commerce is quite advanced. Most of the food is gathered from fishing and small farms. There is also a large trade boom with the Gorons, who live somewhere outside the boundaries of the Great Sea.

There is only one major town in the Great Sea, which is on Windfall Island. Prior to the events of the game, a large base of pirates competing with Tetra and crew thrived on the island that is now the Forsaken Fortress; they were subsequently wiped out by Tetra's pirates. Later, Ganondorf took it over and made it his base of operations. A large tower is raised from the depths about halfway through the game's duration, in the center of the ocean, but barring that, there is not much else of great stature, except the small settlements on Outset, Dragon Roost, and Forest Haven. There was once a similar settlement on Greatfish Island, but it was decimated by Ganondorf before Link ever visits it.

Races and governmentsEdit

The governments of this time are limited to local governments consisting of a village mayor or elder. One of the reasons for this is that there are very few people (and a severe dry-land shortage) in post-deluge Hyrule. But there are still many diverse races living on the Great Sea.

Anouki and YookEdit

The Akouki and Yook live on the wintry Isle of Frost.

Cobble KingdomEdit

The Cobble Kingdom covers the Northwest Quadrant of Phantom Hourglass's Great Sea, and is a long-dead kingdom populated only by the dead during the events of this game.

FishmenEdit

Strange creatures which live in the ocean and draw maps. They like Beedle's All-Purpose Bait. They are very knowledgeable about the Great Sea and adept cartographers, but they tend to hint and imply when talking to Link, instead of being concise and directly giving useful information. It is revealed that the Fishmen (or one particular Fishman) were in some way indebted to the King of Red Lions, although the actual details are not disclosed. One of the fishmen will allow you to participate in a game in which Link tries to strike the fishman with an arrow, whilst the fishman leaps from the sea at varying heights. Their prime purpose consists of drawing locations on Link's map if the location is not already there; they will only comply to this after a single helping of All-Purpose Bait.

GerudoEdit

The Gerudo as a tribe do not appear in the game, though Ganondorf, an ancient Gerudo King, appears in The Wind Waker, and Astrid, Jolene, and Joanne, three characters resembling Gerudo, appear in Phantom Hourglass.

Golden FrogsEdit

The Golden Frogs mainly live in a fountain on the Uncharted Isle, though six of them are abroad on the Great Sea, where they can summon cyclones.

GoronsEdit

Most of the Gorons now live on Goron Island, visitable only in Phantom Hourglass, but there are three wayfaring traders in The Wind Waker.

HoHo TribeEdit

Hailing from the land of Wayaway, the HoHos are seafarers that are constantly on the look for treasure. In The Wind Waker, it at first seems that there is only one, constantly traveling Old Man HoHo, while Phantom Hourglass reveals that they are actually a full tribe of people.


KoroksEdit

The Koroks live on a small island with the Deku Tree, who is implied to have been the Deku Sprout in Ocarina of Time. Under the orders of the Deku Tree, the Koroks move among the islands of the Great Sea, planting seeds in the hope that it will allow the expansion of the mountaintops to create one large island, combining all the current ones. It is heavily implied that the Koroks have descended from the Kokiri. The Deku Tree tells Link that their appearance changed as an adaptation to living on the Great Sea.

PiratesEdit

Pirates plunder the ocean in search of treasure, of which there is certainly an abundance. One group of pirates is led by a young girl named Tetra. She has some knowledge of the ancient past of Hyrule and is searching a way to recover these ancient and valuable relics. They are loyal to Tetra, and they show some acts of nobility through the game, despite their profession. They temporarily adopt Aryll and seem to offer caring hospitality.

RitoEdit

A strange race of avians apparently descended from the Zora, the Rito have developed a strong culture on Dragon Roost Island. They are fairly populous and have a strong relationship with the Humans. They are merely beaked humanoid beings until they are given a scale by the Sky Spirit Valoo, which allows them to grow wings. Until this rite of passage, each of the young Rito children use a Grappling Hook as a temporary substitute. The Ritos conduct the postal service across the Great Sea, an obvious choice since they can traverse the Great Sea with ease using their wings. Quill is the most featured of the postmen in the game. It is heavily implied throughout the game that the Rito are descendents of the Zora, who are noticably absent from this installment. For example, Medli, the eventually awakened reincarnation of the Earth Sage of Laruto, who is a Zora, wears the crest of the Zora on her robes, and Laruto calls her "my descendant".

ZoraEdit

No living Zora appears in either game, but Laruto appears as a ghost in The Wind Waker, and the Zola Warrior appears as a rare enemy in Phantom Hourglass.

Islands in The Wind WakerEdit

The islands listed below are arranged as they appear on the map of the overworld, known in the game as the Great Sea. Islands of particular importance to the plot are listed in bold. Almost every island has some use or distinguishing feature; albeit some are not integral to the game.

Map of The Wind Waker's Great Sea.

Outset IslandEdit

Located in the southwest corner of the Great Sea, Outset Island is the island where Link was raised. It is one of the game's largest islands, and is divided into an east and west section, connected by two bridges. In the lower areas of the island live the people of Outset. The population of the island is eleven people (including Link), and they live in wooden houses along the coast and walls. The island is largely composed of two large cliffs, with a rope bridge connecting them. On the western cliff there is a mysterious forest that houses a fairy spring, and, on a lower cliff, is the Savage Labyrinth. There is a lookout tower on the east side of the island. Link also retrieves Nayru's Pearl in a concealed cave towards the rear of the island. The mystical beast, Jabun, finds refuge here after fleeing Greatfish Isle.

Windfall IslandEdit

Windfall Island is the site of the game's main settlement. Located in the north of the sea, the town is located on a rather small area of land, but is built up rather high. There is a grassy plain upon landing on the island. On the far side of the plain is a Bomb Shop. There is a main gate to the town, and the path through the city winds up somewhat counterclockwise. The island's most notable feature is its ferris wheel (which is easily mistaken for a windmill) that also serves as a lighthouse. There are many important locations on the island, including the Potion Shop, Lenzo's (the photographer) home, the mansion, and the jail cell where Tingle is held. It is here where the most non-playable characters inhabit, most of whom have some sort of storyline or back-story, Link can earn many valuables such as treasure maps and heart pieces via running errands relating to these characters.

The island bears a strong resemblance to Kakariko Village from Ocarina of Time, as seen by the windmill-like ferris wheel, and the island's theme is a remix of the Village's tune.

Dragon Roost IslandEdit

Located in the northeast of the Great Sea, Dragon Roost Island is a mountain-island that towers hundreds of feet above the sea. Its name comes from the fact that Valoo, a great dragon, makes his home at the top of the peak. The island is home to the bird folk, the Rito, who reside in a large cavern. Behind the cavern, within the walls of the island, is a spring filled with water, and beyond the spring lies the entrance to Dragon Roost Cavern, a magma-filled cavern that gives access to the top of the island. Bomb Flowers also grow on the mountain. At the base of the mountain is a shrine to the Wind Deities, Zephos and Cyclos. It resembles the Death Mountain of Ocarina of Time, due to the fact it shares a similar map position, has Bomb Flowers, and bears similar internal areas.

Forest HavenEdit

Located in the southeast area of the Great Sea, the Forest Haven is an island in the shape of a humongous tree, and is home to the Deku Tree, who lives inside the island with the Korok race. From the Deku Tree's central location flows forest water, out of an opening in the side of the island and into the sea.

The Forest Haven is similar to Kokiri Forest in Ocarina of Time, due to the presence of the Great Deku Tree and the similarity of the overworld music to Saria's Song.

Nintendo GalleryEdit

The Nintendo Gallery is a room on an island of relatively high elevation near Forest Haven. Link can take a color pictograph of any character and show it to Carlov, the figurine creator, and if he determines the picture to be sufficiently detailed, he will carve a figurine based on the picture, which will be completed after a day in the game world passes.


Dungeons in The Wind WakerEdit

Forsaken FortressEdit

A dismal island located in the northwest of the Great Sea. Primarily, the fortress serves as an enemy stronghold for most of the duration of the game. The master of the island, and also the main antagonist, is Ganondorf. It is heavily guarded from all points of entry, with many shipwrecks surrounding the area as ominous warnings to those that venture near. The security is so tight that Link has to be fired in via a cannon to infiltrate the fortress. Inside the walls of the fortress are many of Ganondorf's minions, including Bokoblins, Moblins, and thieving rats. The most fearsome enemy inside the fortress (excluding Ganondorf) is the Helmaroc King, who keeps close watch of the island from its roost when it is not on searching duties. Phantom Ganon also makes an appearance here.

Aside from its role as Ganondorf's base of operations, the Forsaken Fortress also protects a holding cell situated deep within the premises. It is here that two girls from Windfall Island, Maggie and Mila, and Link's younger sister, Aryll, were held for being suspected of being descendants of Princess Zelda. After saving Aryll, Link battles the giant bird, the Helmaroc King. It is this dungeon where Link gains the Skull Hammer after defeating the Phantom Ganon.

Dragon Roost CavernEdit

This is the first proper dungeon of the game, and, as the name implies, is a large cavern found inside Dragon Roost Island. The entrance to the cavern lies beyond the island's spring. The inside of the cavern is filled with lava and contains bomb flowers, and extends to the very top of the island. It is in this dungeon that Link investigates what is making the dragon, Valoo, angry. As it turns out, Valoo's tail is being tormented by Gohma, a giant lava centipede. Here, Link receives the Grappling Hook from Medli after he rescues her from a gang of Bokoblins and Moblins. Through the remainder of the dungeon, Link uses the Grappling Hook to proceed past previously unreachable places, and ultimately defeates Gohma with its help.

Forbidden WoodsEdit

Located just outside the Forest Haven, the Forbidden Woods looks like a giant, rotting tree from the outside. Link has to use the Wind Waker baton and the Deku Leaf to reach this secluded spot. On the inside, the dungeon is filled with trees and vegetation of all varieties, as the dungeon adopts the customary plant theme. Some water rests in the lower levels of the woods. The Koroks say that they once lived in these woods when they took their previous forms (presumably the Kokiri), and tree-like houses can be found in the woods. Link braves this dungeon to save Makar, who falls into the woods. He then finds Makar and has to save him from a giant monster plant, Kalle Demos. Inside the dungeon Link also obtains the Boomerang.

Tower of the GodsEdit

This gigantic tower rises out of the depths of the ocean when Link places all three of the Goddesses' Pearls on their respective Triangle Islands. Located roughly in the center of the Great Sea, the Tower of Gods is distinguishable from a large radius, given its distinct appearance. To enter it, one must have a boat, as the ocean water flows into the first floor of the tower. The first floor of the tower is somewhat flooded, but the floors above it are dry. Curiously, many of the enemies in the tower are statues such as Beamos and Armos. Most of the puzzles involve Link controlling small statues to help them reach a designated marker. At the highest chamber of the tower, Link fights Gohdan, a giant statue crafted by the gods, and is the only boss who is not technically an enemy of Link, acting as a "test" to prove him worthy of being the "Hero of Winds". After the battle, Link is transported to the top of the tower where he utilises the Grappling Hook to ring the giant bell that opens the path to Hyrule. Also, it is inside this dungeon where Link acquires the Hero's Bow.

Earth TempleEdit

Located deep within Headstone Island in the south of the Great Sea, the Earth Temple was a once great temple that was ruined by Ganondorf's minions after he ordered the death of Laruto, the Zora sage. The inside of the temple is gloomy and lacks light, save for some light beams which emphasize a constant use of mirror light reflection in the dungeon, a technique in which many of the puzzles center around and aid in the acquisition of the Mirror Shield. The majority of the enemies in the dungeon are undead. Link ventures into this temple with Medli, who also has a reflective instrument, and at the end of the temple he fights Jalhalla, the King of Poes. Like the Wind Temple and Makar, some puzzles revolve around Link working in conjunction with his partner, Medli, and keeping her safe.

Wind TempleEdit

Located deep within Gale Island in the north of the Great Sea, the Wind Temple served as the place where the Kokiri sage, Fado, once prayed before he was slain by Ganondorf's minions. Link ventures into this temple with Makar, and inside the temple he finds the Hookshot and battles the giant Molgera, a sand-worm type monster apparently related to the Lanmolas of previous Zelda games. The inside of the temple is grassy and full of trees, which serves as a basis for one of the puzzle themes. As the name suggests, the Wind Temple is full of wind currents, including an enormous fan in one of its largest rooms. Like the Earth Temple and Medli, some puzzles involve Link co-operating with his partner, Makar, to achieve goals, and keeping Makar safe.

Dungeons in Phantom HourglassEdit

Temple of the Ocean KingEdit

The Temple of the Ocean King is an extensive labyrinth located in the northern forest of Mercay Island. It is a shrine to the Ocean King, and where he is worshipped.

Sites on the Great SeaEdit

Travelers' ShipsEdit

There are many wayfarers living on the Great Sea, and Link can visit them on their boats to help them with their troubles for various rewards. For example, in Phantom Hourglass, there are two wayfarers (Nyeve and the Man of Smiles) whose houseboats are constantly attacked by monster Pirates.

The Ghost Ship (The Wind Waker)Edit

At night, by certain islands, a legendary ghost ship will appear sailing in circles by several select islands. It is a dark, glowing ship surrounded by blue flames, and from it can be heard cries of singing or moaning. A chart of the ship was once written, though the writer is said to have died right after writing it. This chart can be found, however, telling where and when the ghost ship appears. It also allows Link to enter the ghost ship, which is not possible without.

SubmarinesEdit

There are several submarines run by enemies. By clearing them out, treasures can be found.

Sea PlatformsEdit

Out in the sea, various sea platforms can be found, run by Bokoblins. Defeating all the enemies can earn Link treasures.

Template:Zelda places



Locations/Ganon's Castle

Ganon's Castle is usually the last stage in The Legend of Zelda series of video games (although it does not always go by that exact name). There, Link, the protagonist of the series, meets with the toughest puzzles and enemies of the game. At the end of the stage, Link usually battles Ganon, the most powerful boss in the game.

Appearances and descriptions by gameEdit

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

File:Zelda1 Spectacle Rock.png
Link standing just outside of Level 9 in The Legend of Zelda right next to Spectacle Rock.

Ganon's lair in The Legend of Zelda (officially known as Level 9, Death Mountain) is more of an underground dungeon than a castle, and is accessible through Spectacle Rock on Death Mountain.

A Link to the PastEdit

Ganon's Tower is on top of Death Mountain in the Dark World, where Hera's Tower is in the Light World. Link's battle with Ganon begins here, against his minion Agahnim, but, after defeat, Ganon escapes from his body and goes to the Pyramid of Power, where Link fights and defeats him as the final boss.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Ganon's Castle replaces Hyrule Castle in the future, after Ganondorf has taken hold of the kingdom. It floats over what appears to be a lake of lava. Link cannot access it without the aid of the six sages, who create a shining rainbow bridge to allow access. Inside, he must deal with tests (or "barriers") pertaining to each sage before entering the central tower itself. During his climb up the tower, Link deals with some of the strongest enemies in the game before reaching Ganondorf, whom he then battles and defeats. After the battle, Ganondorf uses the last of his strength to collapse the castle, prompting Link to escape with Zelda. The castle collapses, but Ganondorf survives and transforms into Ganon on the ruins, but is then defeated again by Link and Zelda.

The Wind WakerEdit

Known in this game as Ganon's Tower, Ganon's lair is located in underwater Hyrule. It cannot be accessed until the Master Sword has finally been restored to its original power, thus allowing Link to remove the invisible barrier blocking the path. The path to Ganon's Tower begins at a bridge behind Hyrule Castle and winds through a canyon, ending at the castle entrance. Ganon's Tower in The Wind Waker shares some characteristics from the previous versions of Ganon's lairs, such as mini-dungeons based on previous dungeons in the game. There are four of these areas, and at the end of each, a black-and-white version of the dungeon's boss must be fought. After passing these areas, Link must enter a maze and survive multiple battles with Phantom Ganon, ending Phantom Ganon's life permanently with a Light Arrow. After this section is complete, Link then fights Puppet Ganon on the floor of the tower, who appears in several monstrous forms. After defeating Puppet Ganon, Link scales the tower and engages Ganondorf in a final showdown at the top of the tower, aided by Zelda. Ganondorf is finally pierced with the Master Sword in the head, turning to stone.

Twilight PrincessEdit

Instead of his own lair, Ganondorf resides in Hyrule Castle at the end of the game, which has suffered considerable structural damage in certain areas. Bulblins have set up a base camp in the eastern wing of the castle, and Link fights their leader in the western wing. The stairwells are decrepit and increasingly absent, and appear to have either eroded or fallen away completely, despite the fact that they must have been intact recently, when the Royal Family was in control. The graveyard of the castle is haunted with multiple Stalfos and other skeletal enemies, and the spirits of several dead soldiers are seen in a room, as well as outside. When Link is outside the castle on lower levels, it is always clouded over and raining, but when he is on the highest external level, the world appears to have gained high winds, black clouds and thunderstorms covering the horizon and sky. The statues at the very highest room have also been destroyed, as Link notes the head of a large statue while approaching the throne. Ganondorf has not been in possession of the castle for very long, but the influence is already very apparent. Notable is also the music of the castle; while it begins as the usual "Hyrule Castle" music, it becomes a mixture of both it and the "Ganon's Castle" music as the player progresses, and in the final stages is has become only Ganon's music.



Moves/Spin Attack

The spin attack is one of Link's signature moves in The Legend of Zelda games.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

In The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Link acquires the spin attack in Death Mountain's top, after bombing a secret entrance to a Great Fairy Fountain and playing the Zelda's Lullaby song. The Great Fairy will then proceed to explain how to use it and about magic usage, conservation and refill.

The spin attack was a chargeable attack that used one magic point. By pressing and holding B, Link could charge his sword. He could still move, but in a really slow and clumsy way. Also, Link could unleash a blue charge if he didn't hold it enough time, or a red charge after max charging. The spin attack always has a limit damage and won't keep increasing the damage it will do to enemies by holding it.

Majora's MaskEdit

In Majora's Mask, Link acquired the Spin Attack in the Great Fairy Shrine in Clock Town. However, as the Fairy's power had been reduced by Skull Kid's attack, she could only give Link the blue, low damage charge. After finding all the Stray Fairies in Woodfall Temple, the Great Fairy of that area will give you the complete charge. Fierce Deity Link won't produce any charge from pressing B and hold.



Songs

The Legend of Zelda is a series of video games developed by Nintendo. Musical instruments are a common part of the gameplay, having appeared in the very first game as well as every other one since (with the exceptions of Four Swords, Four Swords Adventures and Phantom Hourglass). They are most commonly used to teleport Link from one place to another. They can be used for a variety of other tasks, including defeating enemies, summoning and awakening characters, and manipulating time. In his various quests, Link obtains or encounters many instruments upon which these songs are played, and several games cannot be completed without their aid. While it may not always be required to learn or use every song in the game in order to beat it, it is always to the player's advantage.

The Legend of ZeldaEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda

In The Legend of Zelda, Link plays a melody on his Recorder. In the Overworld, this summons a whirlwind which will carry Link to a dungeon entrance he has already visited (in numerical order). It is also used to open one dungeon and reveal certain secrets. In dungeons, particular enemies are vulnerable to the sound of the Recorder. The melody is also mixed into the background music in the title screen of Ocarina of Time, and is also featured as the tune of the Warp Whistle in Super Mario Bros. 3, which also summons a warping whirlwind when played. The Wind Ocarina in The Minish Cap also plays this tune to warp Link to various points around Hyrule.

The Adventure of LinkEdit

Main page: Zelda II: The Adventure of Link

In The Adventure of Link, playing the Recorder will get Link past certain obstacles in the overworld. It is also used to open the sixth dungeon.

A Link to the PastEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past

In the Light World of A Link to the Past, the ocarina is used to summon a bird that can carry Link to eight different locations, some of which require the use of the ocarina to teleport to in order to complete the game. Though the instrument has always been called an ocarina in the Japanese releases of the game, the US releases all refer to it as a flute.

Link's AwakeningEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening

In Link's Awakening, Link obtains an ocarina. He can play it before he learns any songs but will only produce a flat, tuneless string of notes with no coherent melody. Interestingly, though, it does bear a slight resemblance to the recorder melody from The Legend of Zelda.

Ballad of the Wind FishEdit

This is used to open the entrance to the final dungeon, as well as to kill Pols Voices. A tune of the same name is featured in Majora's Mask, but the two tunes are the same in name only ("the tune played by the Wind Fish" is merely mentioned as the Zora band's biggest hit, by their manager).

Manbo's MamboEdit

This song is used to teleport Link to Manbo's Pond next to Crazy Tracy's house, which is approximately in the center of the island map. He can also use it in dungeons to warp to the dungeon entrance.

The Frog's Song of SoulEdit

Learned from the frog Mamu. This song is used to resurrect the dead and animate the non-living.

Ocarina of TimeEdit

Main page: The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time
Button Note
A D
File:Ocarina down.PNG F
File:Ocarina right.PNG A
File:Ocarina left.PNG B
File:Ocarina up.PNG D

In Ocarina of Time, Link initially makes use of the Fairy Ocarina, which is soon replaced by the Ocarina of Time. There are twelve predefined songs that can be learned and played in the game, but it is also possible to play a songs of the player's creation. This phenomenon is due to the fact that the player must input a sequence of notes that may thereafter be recognized as a valid song, called the Scarecrow's Song. This method contrasts to those of previous games of the series, wherein all songs were created as part of the game.

The songs of the ocarina are based on five notes which correspond to five buttons on the game controller when Link uses it. Therefore, in order for Link to play a song, the player presses the corresponing C button (or direction on the C-stick or other button in the Gamecube versions) to make Link whip out the Ocarina, and then the buttons for the song (s)he wants Link to play. To play Zelda's Lullaby, for instance, the player will tap the corresponding C buttons (or directions or other buttons, in the case of the Gamecube versions), which are C left, C up, C right, C left, C up, C right (which, in the C-Major scale, corresponds to BDABDA). Although not required at any point in the game, the player can use the R and Z buttons to play various other notes by pressing the R or Z buttons, and can alter regular notes by moving the joystick,