Flora of New York/Crossosomatales, Sapindales


Myrtales
Flora of New York — Crossosomatales, Sapindales
Malvales
Table of
contents
Genus
index
Protected species index Invasive species index


Superorder Order Family Subfamily Tribe Genus Common names #
Myrtanae
(malvids)
Crossosomatales Staphyleaceae Staphylea bladdernut 1
Sapindales Anacardiaceae Anacardioideae Rhoeae Rhus sumac 5
Toxicodendron poison ivy, poison oak, poison sumac 4
Cotinus smoketree 2
Sapindaceae Hippocastanoideae Acereae Acer maple 15
Hippocastaneae Aesculus buckeye, horse chestnut 2
Sapindoideae Koelreuterieae Koelreuteria golden rain tree 1
Paullinieae Cardiospermum balloon vine 1
Simaroubaceae Ailantheae Ailanthus tree-of-heaven, Chinese sumac 1
Rutaceae Rutoideae Ruta rue 1
Toddalioideae Zanthoxylum prickly ash 1
Ptelea hop tree 1
Phellodendron Amur cork tree 1
Dictamnus gas plant 1
Meliaceae Melioideae Melieae Melia Chinaberry tree 1

Order CrossosomatalesEdit

The Crossosomatales Takht. ex Reveal (1993) is a small order[1] that has a single native species in New York.[2]
  1. P. F. Stevens (2001-2015). Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 13. Sep. 2013.
  2. Staphyleaceae Troy Weldy & David Werier (2013) New York Flora Atlas. New York Flora Association, Albany, New York.

Family StaphyleaceaeEdit

The Staphyleaceae (bladdernut family) has been placed in Sapindales as recently as 1981 (Cronquist) and 1997 (Takhtajan).[1] Only one species of this family is found in New York.[2]
  1. P. F. Stevens (2001-2015). Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. Version 13. Sep. 2013.
  2. Staphyleaceae Troy Weldy & David Werier (2013) New York Flora Atlas. New York Flora Association, Albany, New York.

StaphyleaEdit

Crossosomatales — Staphyleaceae — Staphylea
Staphylea Bladdernut N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Staphylea trifolia L.
1766. Staphylodendron trifoliatum Crantz
American bladdernut,
Bladder nut
Staphylier à trois folioles,
Staphylier trifolié
Native, C:7,
Secure

FAC

Perennial,
Tree, shrub,
Shade
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.
BNA
LBJ

Images, wsp

Order SapindalesEdit

The order Sapindales

Family AnacardiaceaeEdit

The Anacardiaceae (cashew or sumac family) ...[1]
  1. Anacardiaceae Troy Weldy & David Werier (2013) New York Flora Atlas. New York Flora Association, Albany, New York.

Subfamily AnacardioideaeEdit

RhusEdit

Rhus contains the sumac trees, which are all beneficial New York natives. However, the Chinese sumac or tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) in the Simaroubaceae (quassia family, below) is a potentially invasive non-native.
Sapindales — Anacardiaceae — Anacardioideae — Rhoeae — Rhus
Rhus Sumac N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
L.

1753. Datisca hirta L. (i)
1756. Rhus typhina L.
1847. Rhus typhina var. lacinata
1891. Toxicodendron typhinum Kuntze
1892. Rhus hirta (L.) Sudw. (i)
1903. Schmaltzia hirta (L.) Small (i)
Staghorn sumac,
Stag's-horn sumac,
Velvet sumac,
Vinegar tree
Sumac vinaigrier,
Sumac amaranthe,
Vinaigrier
Native, C:1,
Secure

UPL

Perennial,
Tree, shrub
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.
BNA


Images, wsp
 L.

1753. Rhus glabra L.
Smooth sumac Native, C:3,
Secure

UPL

Perennial,
Tree, shrub
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT 
ITIS

BNA
LBJ

Images, wsp
 L.
var. copallinum

1753. Rhus copallinum L.
Winged sumac Native, C:7,
Secure

FACU-UPL

Perennial,
Tree, Shrub
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN



BNA
LBJ

Images, wsp
 L.
var. latifolia Engl.

1883. Rhus copallinum var. latifolia
1891. Toxicodendron copallinum
var. latifolium
Broadleaf winged sumac Native, C:7,
No reports

FACU-UPL

Perennial,
Tree, Shrub
  NYFA-U
USDA-NN



BNA


Images, wsp
 Aiton
var. aromatica

1789. Rhus aromatica Aiton
Fragrant sumac Native, C:7,
Secure

UPL

Perennial,
Shrub
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN

ARS ITIS

BNA
LBJ

Images, wsp
 Greene (pro sp.)

Rhus glabra ×
Rhus typhina

1901. Rhus glabra var. borealis
1906. Rhus borealis Greene
1908. Rhus pulvinata Greene
Northern sumac,
Pulvinate sumac,
Hybrid of
 smooth sumac &
 staghorn sumac
Native,
Threatened
  NYFA-2?
USDA-NN


Trop.



Images, wsp
Rhus (excluded taxa) Sumac N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
var. arenaria

1905. Schmaltzia arenaria Greene
1937. Rhus trilobata var. arenaria
1940. S. trilobata var. arenaria
1941. R. aromatica var. arenaria
1945. R. arenaria (Greene) G.N.Jones
Fragrant sumac N. America native
 US midwest,
N.Y. excluded
  NYFA-XCLD
USDA-N0


Trop.



Images, wsp

ToxicodendronEdit

Toxicodendron contains the native, but often unwelcome, poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac trio. All of these produce the resin urushiol which can cause severe skin and mucous-membrane irritation in those who have a sensitivity to it.
Toxicodendron sect. ToxicodendronEdit
While both eastern poison-ivy (T. radicans) and western poison-ivy (T. rydbergii) are rhizomatous and may occur as low shrubs, only eastern poison-ivy has aerial roots, allowing it to also occur as a trailing or climbing liana.[1]

Eastern poison-ivy — In North America in general, T. radicans ssp. radicans occurs primarily east of the Appalachian Mountains and can be considered as a coastal taxon, while ssp. negundo occurs primarily west of the Appalachians. In New York, ssp. radicans occurs primarily in the southeast part of the state and up the Hudson Valley, while ssp. negundo occurs in the western and central parts of the state.[2]

Western poison-ivyToxicodendron rydbergii is closely related to eastern poison-ivy, and despite its morphological differences and lack of climbing ability, may still be considered a subspecies or variety of T. radicans.


T. radicans Leaflets Petioles Drupes Stems
ssp. radicans fairly flat, underside glabrous except on main veins; tufts of hair on vein axils glabrous pubescent, scabrous, or papillose may have aerial roots
ssp. negundo fairly flat, underside softly pubescent pubescent usually glabrous may have aerial roots
ssp. rydbergii thicker, somewhat folded, underside glabrous to sparsely strigose, upper surface glabrous glabrous larger, glabrous without aerial roots
Sapindales — Anacardiaceae — Anacardioideae — Rhoeae — Toxicodendron sect. Toxicodendron
ToxicodendronMill.sect. Toxicodendron Poison ivy N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
(L.) Kuntze
ssp. radicans

1753. Rhus radicans L.
1768. Toxicodendron vulgare Mill.
1891. Toxicodendron radicans Kuntze
1902. Rhus littoralis Mearns
1924. R. radicans var. littoralis Deam
1941. R. radicans var. malacotrichocarpa
Fernald
Eastern poison ivy
Herbe à puce de l'Est
Native, C:3,
Secure

FAC

Perennial,
Herb-forb, Vine,
Shrub, Subshrub
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.
NSE BNA


Images, wsp
(L.) Kuntze
ssp. negundo (Greene) Gillis

1905. Toxicodendron negundo Greene
1971. T. radicans ssp. negundo
1990. T. radicans var. negundo
Midwestern poison ivy,
Eastern poison ivy
Native, C:3,
Unranked

FAC

Perennial,
Herb-forb, Vine,
Shrub, Subshrub
  NYFA-U
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ITIS
Trop.
BNA


Images, wsp
(Small ex Rydb.) Greene

1900. Rhus rydbergii Small ex Rydb.
1905. Toxicodendron rydbergii Greene
1927. Rhus toxicodendron var. rydbergii
Garrett
1939. Rhus radicans var. rydbergii
1961. T. radicans var. rydbergii
[1]
1981. Rhus radicans ssp. rydbergii
1982. T. radicans ssp. rydbergii
Western poison ivy,
Rydberg's poison ivy,
Northern poison oak
Herbe à puce de Rydberg,
Sumac de Rydberg
Native, C:4,
Vulnerable

FAC

Perennial,
Herb-forb, Vine,
Shrub, Subshrub
  NYFA-3?
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.
NSE BNA


Images, wsp
Toxicodendronsect. Toxicodendron (excluded taxa) Poison ivy N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
Mill.

1768. T. pubescens Mill.
    
    
Atlantic poison oak
Eastern poison-oak

N. America native
 southeast U.S.,
N.Y. excluded
  NYFA-XCLD
USDA-N0






Images, wsp
Toxicodendron sect. VenenataEdit
Sapindales — Anacardiaceae — Anacardioideae — Rhoeae — Toxicodendron sect. Venenata
ToxicodendronMill.sect. Venenata Poison sumac N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 (L.) Kuntze

Poison sumac Native,
Likely secure,
Perennial,
Shrub-tree
  NYFA-4
USDA-NN
NPT 
ITIS




Images, wsp

CotinusEdit

Sapindales — Anacardiaceae — Anacardioideae — Rhoeae — Cotinus
Cotinus Smoke tree N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Scop.

1753. Rhus cotinus L.
1771. Cotinus coggygria Scop.
1891. Cotinus cotinus Sarg.
Smoketree,
Smokebush,
Venetian sumac,
Wigtree
Introduced from
 Eurasia
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX

ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
 Raf.

1840. Cotinus obovatus Raf.
1849. Cotinus americanus Nutt.
1859. Rhus cotinoides Nutt. ex J.G.Cooper
1892. Rhus americana Sudw.
1894. Cotinus cotinoides Britton
American smoketree,
Chittamwood
Introduced from
 US South,
N. America native,
Cultivated in NY,
Not naturalized

Perennial,
Tree, shrub
  NYFA-0
USDA-N0
NPT 
ARS ITIS
Trop.
NSE BNA


Images, wsp

Family SapindaceaeEdit

The Sapindaceae (soapberry family) ...[1]

Subfamily HippocastanoideaeEdit

Tribe AcereaeEdit

AcerEdit
The genus Acer is represented by about fifteen native or naturalized species in New York. These species are here separated into sections following de Jong (2002).[2] These sections are further organized into three tables corresponding to the three clusters (aceroid, palmatoid, and platanoid) described by Grimm et. al. (2006).[3]

Most Acer species go by the common name maple, and all have opposite leaves. Maples are represented by the initial letter 'M' in the mnemonic "MADCap Horse," which can be used to remember which trees have opposite leaves. The other opposite-leave trees represented are Ash, Dogwood, Caprifoliaceae, and Horse chestnut. Of course there are exceptions.


  1. Sapindaceae Troy Weldy & David Werier (2013) New York Flora Atlas. New York Flora Association, Albany, New York.
  2. P. C. de Jong, 2002. World maple diversity, pp.2–11, in: Wiegrefe, S. J., H. Angus, D. Otis, and P. Gregorey (eds.). Proceedings of the 2002 International Maple Symposium held at Westonbirt Arboretum and the Royal Agricultural College in Gloucestershire, England.
  3. Guido W. Grimm, Susanne S. Renner, Alexandros Stamatakis & Vera Hemleben, 2006. A Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Phylogeny of Acer Inferred with Maximum Likelihood, Splits Graphs, and Motif Analysis of 606 Sequences.
Aceroid sect. AcerEdit
 
Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) leaves, fruits, and flowers.

Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and black maple (Acer nigrum) are often treated as conspecific, with black maple identified as a subspecies of sugar maple. There are significant morphological differences, but little genetic difference between the two trees, which commonly hybridize. So it's thought that the morphological differences may be more the result of local conditions.[1] The range of black maple does not extend much farther east than New York, while sugar maple is common in both New England and the Mid-west.

The Eurasian sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus), also in the Acer section, is not common in New York, but it can become weedy and is now prohibited due to its demonstrated invasive potential.


Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Aceroid sect. Acer
Acersect. Acerser. Saccharodendron Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Marshall

1785. Acer saccharum Marshall
Sugar maple,
Hard maple,
Rock maple
Érable à sucre,
Érable franc,
Érable franche
Native,
Secure

FACU

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS 




Images, wsp
 F.Michx.

1812. Acer nigrum F.Michx.
1838. Acer saccharinum var. nigrum
1889. Acer saccharum var. nigrum
1933. Saccharodendron nigrum Small
1952. Acer saccharum ssp. nigrum
1983. Acer saccharum var. viride
Black maple,
Black sugar maple
Érable noir
Native,
Secure

FACU

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
Acer nigrum × saccharum

Acer nigrum ×
Acer saccharum

Hybrid of
 black maple &
 sugar maple
Hybride de
 érable noir et de
 érable à sucre
Native,
Unranked
 
Can





Images, wsp
Acersect. Acerser. Acer Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Acer pseudoplatanus L.
Sycamore maple,
False planetree
Érable sycomore
Introduced from
 Eurasia,
Highly invasive,
NYIS: 71%[1],
iMapInvasives,
Prohibited[2],
CP-5[3] NE-4[4]
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT Can





Images, wsp
Aceroid sect. RubraEdit
Silver maple (Acer saccharinum) and red maple (Acer rubrum) are also closely related and hybridize as Freeman maple (Acer × freemanii)
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Aceroid sect. Rubra
Acersect. Rubra Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Acer saccharinum L.
1789. Acer dasycarpum Ehrh.
1803. Acer eriocarpum Michx.
1881. Acer album hort. ex G. Nicholson
1933. Argentacer saccharinum Small
Silver maple,
Soft maple,
White maple,
River maple
Érable argenté,
Érable blanc,
Plaine blanche
Native,
Secure

FACW

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp
 L.
var. rubrum

1753. Acer rubrum L.
Red maple,
Scarlet maple,
Soft maple,
Swamp maple
Native,
Secure

FAC

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS




Images, wsp
 L.
var. trilobum Torr. & A.Gray ex K.Koch

    Acer carolinianum
    Rufacer carolinianum
    Acer rubrum var. tridens
Trident red maple Native,
Vulnerable

FACW-OBL

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-3-4
USDA-NN
NPT 
ARS ITIS




Images, wsp
 A.E.Murray

Acer rubrum ×
Acer saccharinum

1969. Acer × freemani A.E.Murray
Freeman maple,
Freeman's maple,
Soft maple
Native,
Threatened
  NYFA-2
USDA-NN

ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp
Aceroid sect. GinnalaEdit
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Aceroid sect. Ginnala
Acersect. Ginnala Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Maxim.

1856. Acer ginnala Maxim.
1857. Acer tataricum var. laciniatum
1859. Acer tataricum var. ginnala
1890. Acer tataricum ssp. ginnala
Amur maple,
Ginnala maple
Érable du fleuve Amour
Introduced from
 east Asia,
Moderately invasive,
NYIS: 66%[1],
iMapInvasives,
CP-3[2] NE-4[3],
WW
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT 
ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
  1. New York non-native plant invasiveness assessmentAcer ginnala: Moderate 66 (MCLH).
  2. Appendix 3. Plant species that are considered moderately to highly invasive to natural areas in the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)
  3. Category 4 Plants - local concern and monitoring - Eastern Region invasive plants, ranked by degree of invasiveness as based on information from States (1998) US Forest Service
Aceroid sect. PentaphyllaEdit
 
Acer buergerianum var. formosanum
Section Pentaphylla contains two East Asian maples that are commonly cultivated in New York, but are not known to naturalize in the state.
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Aceroid sect. Pentaphylla
Acersect. Pentaphylla Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Miq.

1865. Acer buergerianum Miq.
 auct. Acer trifidumnon Thunb. (1784)
Trident maple Introduced from
 China,
 Taiwan,
Cultivated,
Not naturalized
  NYFA-U
USDA-00

ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
 (Franch.) Pax

1894. Acer nikoense var. griseum
1902. Acer griseum (Franch.) Pax
Paperbark maple,
Chinese paperbark maple
Introduced from
 China,
Cultivated,
Not naturalized
  NYFA-U
USDA-00

ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
Palmatoid sect. NegundoEdit
 
Acer negundo
Box-elder (Acer negundo) is a common, often weedy tree that may be native to only the south-central portion of New York State, in the vicinity of Binghamton and Ithaca. Elsewhere in the state it is considered to be introduced. Box-elder is considered to be introduced and invasive in parts of Canada.

Boxelder is the only locally native or naturalized Acer species with compound leaves, which often superficially resemble poison ivy (Toxicodendron spp.)


Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Palmatoid sect. Negundo
Acersect. Negundo Boxelder maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.
var. negundo

1753. Acer negundo L.
1794. Negundo aceroides (L.) Moench
1882. Negundo negundo (L.) Karst.
Box-elder,
Manitoba maple,
Ash-leaved maple
Érable à Giguère,
Érable négondo,
Érable argilière
Native, C:1,
Secure,
Note [1]

FACW-FAC

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS 
Trop.
BNA


Images, wsp
Acer (excluded taxa) Boxelder maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.
var. violaceum (G.Kirchn.) H.Jaeger

1864. N. aceroides var. violaceum
1884. Acer negundo var. violaceum
1908. Acer violaceum Simonk.
1982. Negundo aceroides
ssp. violaceus W.A.Weber
Box elder Native, C:1,
Unranked,
Note:[2]

FACW-FAC

Perennial,
Tree
  NYFA-?
USDA-N0
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp
  1. Acer negundo is thought to be native to only parts of the state, mainly in the south-central part. It is considered to be introduced elsewhere and may be weedy.
  2. VASCAN, citing FNA Ed. Comm., in prep. f., considers Acer negundo var. violaceum to be a synonym of Acer negundo.
Palmatoid sect. SpicataEdit
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Palmatoid sect. Spicata
Acersect. Spicata Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Lam.

1771. Acer pensylvanicum Du Roi
non L.
1784. Acer parviflorum Ehrh.
non Franch. & Sav.
1786. Acer spicatum Lam.
1811. Acer montanum W.T.Aiton
non Lam.
Mountain maple,
Moose maple,
White maple
Érable à épis,
Érable bâtard,
Plaine bâtarde,
Plaine bleue
Native,
Likely secure
  NYFA-4-5
USDA-NN
NPT 
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp
Palmatoid sect. PalmataEdit
Japanese maple, a popular ornamental tree has been found to naturalize in forest understories in the southeastern part of the state, and is considered invasive there.
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Palmatoid sect. Palmata
Acersect. Palmata Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Thunb.

1784. Acer palmatum Thunb.
1867. Acer sanguineum Carrière
Japanese maple Introduced from
 temperate Asia,
Moderately invasive,
NYIS: 50%[1],
iMapInvasives,
NE-4[2] VT
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT 
ARS ITIS




Images, wsp
  1. New York non-native plant invasiveness assessmentAcer palmatum: Moderate (50%).
  2. Category 4 Plants - local concern and monitoring - Eastern Region invasive plants, ranked by degree of invasiveness as based on information from States (1998) US Forest Service
Platanoid sect. MacranthaEdit
 
Acer pensylvanicum
striped maple
As the name suggests, the main stems of striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum, the only New York native in sect. Macrantha) have vertical white stripes on green-to-brown bark.
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Platanoid sect. Macrantha
Acersect. Macrantha Snakebark maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Acer pensylvanicum L.
1755. Acer canadense Duhamel
1771. Acer striatum Du Roi
Striped maple,
Green-striped maple,
Moosewood,
Whistlewood,
Goosefoot maple,
Pennsylvania maple
Èrable de Pennsylvanie
Native, C:7,
Secure

FACU

Perennial,
Shrub-tree,
Part shade - shade
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
Platanoid sect. PlatanoideaEdit
 
Acer platanoides
Norway Maple
Norway maple (Acer platanoides) is a widly-used street tree but has escaped cultivation near northeastern cities and has become a major threat to nearby forests and other habitats, where it can become the dominant tree and displace native vegetation.
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Acereae — Acer – Platanoid sect. Platanoidea
Acersect. Platanoidea Maple N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

    
Norway maple Introduced,
Very highly invasive,
NYIS: 82%[1],
iMapInvasives,
Regulated[2],
CP-2[3] NE-1[4]
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX






Images, wsp

Hedge maple,
Field maple
Introduced,
Moderately invasive,
CP-3[5]
  NYFA-X
USDA-X






Images, wsp
 Bunge

1833. Acer truncatum Bunge
    Acer platanoides var. truncatum
    
Painted maple,
Shantung maple,
Purple-blow maple
Introduced from
 temperate Asia
  NYFA-U

ARS 
Trop.



Images, wsp
  1. New York non-native plant invasiveness assessmentAcer platanoides: Very high (82).
  2. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Regulation 6 NYCRR Part 575 Prohibited and Regulated Invasive Species
  3. Appendix 2. Plant species that are considered highly invasive to natural areas in the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)
  4. Category 1 Plants - highly invasive - Eastern Region invasive plants, ranked by degree of invasiveness as based on information from States (1998) US Forest Service
  5. Appendix 3. Plant species that are considered moderately to highly invasive to natural areas in the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)

Tribe HippocastaneaeEdit

AesculusEdit

The genus Aesculus is sometimes included in its own Hippocastanaceae (horse chestnut or buckeye family).

Aesculus sect. AesculusEdit
 
Aesculus hippocastanum
horse chestnut
Horse chestnuts (Aesculus hippocastanum) were introduced from Europe, and are not closely related to Castanea (chestnuts), which are in the Fagaceae with Quercus (oak) and Fagus (beech). The horse chestnut is on the Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council Plant List.[1]

Horse chestnuts are commonly planted in New York State. The New York Flora Atlas questions whether they truly naturalize or just repeatedly escape cultivation.


Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Hippocastaneae — Aesculus sect. Aesculus
Aesculussect. Aesculus Horse chestnut N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT

Horse chestnut Introduced from
 S.E. Europe,
Potentially invasive,
CP-5[1],
WW
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT 


NSE BNA


Images, wsp
  1. Appendix 5. Plant species of concern (Watch List) within the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)
Aesculus sect. PaviaEdit
 
Aesculus glabra
Ohio buckeye

Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Hippocastanoideae — Hippocastaneae — Aesculus sect. Pavia
Aesculussect. Pavia Buckeye N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Willd.
var. glabra

Ohio buckeye Introduced,
Midwest native,
CP-5[1]
  NYFA-X
USDA-NN
NPT 


NSE BNA


Images, wsp
 Walter

1788. Aesculus parviflora Walter
    
Bottlebrush buckeye
Pavier blanc
N. America native
 US South,
Not naturalized,
Cultivated

Perennial,
Shrub-tree
  NYFA-Xm
USDA-N0
NEW-0
ARS 

NSE BNA


Images, wsp
Aesculussect. Pavia (excluded taxa) Buckeye N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Aesculus pavia L.
Red buckeye
Pavier rouge
N. America native
 US South,
No specimens,
Cultivated
  NYFA-0
USDA-NX

ARS 

NSE BNA


Images, wsp
 Sol.

1778. Aesculus flava Sol.
1785. A. octandra Marshall
Yellow buckeye,
Sweet buckeye,
Big buckeye
Marronnier jaune
N. America native
 US South,
No specimens,
Cultivated

Perennial,
Shrub-tree
  NYFA-0
USDA-N0
NEW-0
ARS 

NSE BNA


Images, wsp
Aesculussect. (cross) Cross-sect. hybrid N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT

Aesculus pavia ×
Aesculus hippocastanum

    
    
    
Red horsechestnut,
Hybrid of
 red buckeye &
 horse chestnut
Introduced,
No specimens,
Cultivated

Perennial,
Tree
 






Images, wsp
  1. Appendix 5. Plant species of concern (Watch List) within the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)

Subfamily SapindoideaeEdit

Tribe KoelreuterieaeEdit

KoelreuteriaEdit
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Sapindoideae — Koelreuterieae — Koelreuteria
Koelreuteria Koelreuteria N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Laxm.

Golden rain-tree Introduced,
Invasive in US South
  NYFA-X
USDA-X0






Images, wsp

Tribe PaullinieaeEdit

CardiospermumEdit
 
Cardiospermum halicacabum
balloon vine, heartseed
Cardiospermum is a small genus of primarily tropical and subtropical herbaceous vines. C. halicacabum (balloon vine) is thought to be a neotropical native but has been cultivated as an ornamental as far north as New York State. Presumed garden escapes were collected in Queens and Warren counties around 1900, but the species is not thought to have naturalized in the state. Balloon vine is considered to be a noxious weed in more southern states, as far north as Missouri and Delaware, so it may be of concern in New York at some point.
Sapindales — Sapindaceae — Sapindoideae — Paullinieae — Cardiospermum
Cardiospermum Balloonvine N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
L. (1753)

Balloon vine,
Heartseed,
Heart-pea,
Love in a puff
Introduced,
Not naturalized,
Noxious US South
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT 
ARS 

BNA


Images, wsp

Family SimaroubaceaeEdit

The Simaroubaceae (quassia family) is represented by a single species persisting outside of cultivation in New York.

AilanthusEdit

 
Ailanthus altissima
tree-of-heaven
Ailanthus contains probably no more that ten species, which are native to various parts of Asia and Australasia.

Tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima) is a successful urban tree that was introduced to North America from China as early as 1751. It is now considered to be highly invasive in New York State and elsewhere outside its native range.


Sapindales — Simaroubaceae — Ailantheae — Ailanthus
AilanthusDesf. Ailanthus N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
(Mill.) Swingle (1916)

Ailanthus glandulosa Desf.
Tree-of-heaven,
Chinese sumac,
Varnish-tree,
Copa-tree
Vernis de la Chine
Introduced from
 temperate China,
Highly invasive,
NYIS: 68%[1],
iMapInvasives,
CP-2[2] NE-1[3]
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT 
ARS ITIS




Images, wsp
  1. New York non-native plant invasiveness assessmentAilanthus altissima: Moderate (68).
  2. Appendix 2. Plant species that are considered highly invasive to natural areas in the central Finger Lakes region. Policy on the use of non-native plants in Cornell Botanic Gardens' accessioned collections (2009)
  3. Category 1 Plants - highly invasive - Eastern Region invasive plants, ranked by degree of invasiveness as based on information from States (1998) US Forest Service

Family RutaceaeEdit

The Rutaceae (rue or citrus family) ...

Subfamily RutoideaeEdit

RutaEdit

 
Ruta graveolens
rue
Rue (Ruta graveolens) is cultivated as a ornamental, culinary, and medicinal herb, and its few discoveries in the wilds of New York are not thought to have naturalized.
Sapindales — Rutaceae — Rutoideae — Ruta
Ruta Rue N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Ruta graveolens L.
1770. Ruta hortensis Mill.
Rue,
Common rue,
Garden rue,
Herb-of-grace
Rue des jardins,
Rue officinale,
Rue fétide
Introduced from
 Europe,
Not naturalized
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp

Subfamily ToddalioideaeEdit

The foliage of the two New York native members of this subfamily, prickly-ash (Zanthoxylum americanum) and wafer-ash (Ptelea trifoliata), are important food for giant swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) caterpillars.

ZanthoxylumEdit

 
Zanthoxylum americanum
prickly ash

Sapindales — Rutaceae — Toddalioideae — Zanthoxylum
Zanthoxylum Pricklyash N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Mill.

1768. Zanthoxylum americanum Mill.
1806. Zanthoxylum fraxinifolium Willd.
1830. Thylax fraxineum Raf.
Northern prickly-ash,
Common prickly-ash,
Toothachetree
Clavalier d'Amérique,
Frêne épineux
Native,
Secure
  NYFA-5
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp

PteleaEdit

 
Ptelea trifoliata
wafer ash
In New York State, the hoptree or wafer-ash is considered to be native near the shores of Lake Erie and western Lake Ontario. Elsewhere in the state, naturalized populations are probably escapes from cultivation.
Sapindales — Rutaceae — Toddalioideae — Ptelea
Ptelea Hoptree N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.
ssp. trifoliata

1753. Ptelea trifoliata L.
1838. Ptelea baldwinii Torr. & A.Gray
2001. Ptelea trifoliata var. baldwinii
Common hoptree,
Wafer-ash,
Stinking ash,
Three-leaved hop tree
Ptéléa trifolié,
Orme de Samarie
Native, C:8,
Endangered

FAC-FACU

Perennial,
Tree,
Sun-shade
  NYFA-1-2
USDA-NN
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp

PhellodendronEdit

Sapindales — Rutaceae — Toddalioideae — Phellodendron
Phellodendron Corktree N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 Rupr.

1857. Phellodendron amurense Rupr.
1871. Phellodendron japonicum Maxim.
1905. Phellodendron sachalinense Sarg.
1909. Phellodendron lavallei Dode
Amur corktree,
Chinese corktree
Phellodendron de l'Amour,
Arbre liège de Chine,
Phellodendron de Sibérie
Introduced from
 temperate Asia,
Highly invasive,
NYIS: 75%[1],
Prohibited[2]
  NYFA-X
USDA-XX
NPT Can
ARS ITIS
Trop.



Images, wsp

DictamnusEdit

The gasplant gets its name from the volatile citrus-scented oil produced by its leaves.

Sapindales — Rutaceae — Toddalioideae — Dictamnus
Dictamnus Dictamnus N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT
 L.

1753. Dictamnus albus L.
1805. Dictamnus fraxinellus Pers.
1840. Dictamnus fraxinellus var. caucasicus
Fisch. & C.A.Mey.
1932. Dictamnus caucasicus Grossh.
Gasplant,
Dittany,
Burningbush
Introduced from
 Eurasia,
Not naturalized

Perennial,
Herb-forb
  NYFA-X
USDA-X0
NPT 
ARS 




Images, wsp

Family MeliaceaeEdit

The Meliaceae (mahogany family)...

Subfamily MelioideaeEdit

Tribe MelieaeEdit

MeliaEdit
Sapindales — Meliacea — Melioideae — Melieae
Melia Melia N.Y. Status Images Distribution NY NPT

Chinaberry tree Introduced,
No specimens
  NYFA-X
USDA-X






Images, wsp

Myrtales
Flora of New York — Crossosomatales, Sapindales
Malvales
Table of
contents
Genus
index
Protected species index Invasive species index