Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...d5/2. Nc3

Queen's Pawn Game
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)
Moves: 1. d4 d5 2. Nc3

Queen's Pawn Game: Chigorin VariationEdit

The Chigorin Variation (Named after Mikhail Chigorin) is an opening that may often transpose to other lines. It is rarely played by masters and tournament players, as the c-pawn is blocked, disallowing it from contesting the d5-pawn. Nonetheless, this line is considered sound and leads to closed positions involving much slow, strategic maneuvering.

The main lines after this are the 2... Nf6 3. Bf4, the Jobava London System, and 2... Nf6 3. Bg5, the Richter–Veresov Attack (which transposes into the French Defense after 3... e6 or remains in independent lines after 3... Nbd7).

Black can also reasonably play 2... e6 (which likely leads to the aforementioned lines), 2... c6 (likely transposing to the Caro–Kann after 3. e4), 2... g6, 2... Bf5, or even 2... f5!? (the Dutch Variation) or 2... c5!? (the Irish Gambit, which is a fairly unexplored option).

2... Nc6 transposes to the Nimzowitsch Defence after 3. e4, normally reached by 1. e4 Nc6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables, see theory table and for notation, see algebraic notation..

1. d4 d5 2. Nc3

2 3 4 5
Nimzowitsch Defense ...
Nc6
e4
dxe4
d5
Nb8!?
Nxe4
c6
=
Alburt Defense ...
Bf5
Bf4
Nc6
e3
e6
g4
Bg6
=
Jobava London ...
Nf6
Bf4
a6
e3
e6
g4
Bb4
=

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ReferencesEdit