Proto-Turkic/Vocabulary

Welcome to fifth lesson in Proto-Turkic, wikibooks!

VocabularyEdit

The fact that the Lir group still has a living language keeps its vocabulary wide for Proto-Turkic. Although there are different configurations, they are close to each other. This takes us to a language very close to Xiongnu Turkic.

However, it is necessary not to rely on the Common Turkic and Altaic configurations made unconsciously. In this way, you can prevent information pollution.

The four elements in Proto-TurkicEdit

  • water - *sub[1]
  • earth - *toprak
  • fire - *ōt[2]
  • wind - *yẹl

The words are short for the peoples who lead a nomadic life in the steppes of East Asia. Due to this lifestyle and various factors, people have formed words with one or two syllable roots. Long words are only provided with suffixes. Food and animal names are also made up of short words.

Foods in Proto-TurkicEdit

  • wheat - *bodagay[3]
  • barley - *arpa[4]
  • millet - *tạrïg[5]
  • egg - *yumurtka[6]
  • salt - *tūŕ
  • onion - *sogan
  • hen - *tiakïgu
  • meat - *et
  • milk - *sǖt
  • honey - *bạl
  • butter - *yāg
  • cherry - *yidge (complicated)[7]
  • strawberry - *yidgelek (complicated)[7]
  • bird cherry - *yïmurt
  • fruit, vegetable - *yẹ̄miĺč

In today's Turkic languages, an old Common-Turkic word *čiye and Proto-Turkic *yidgelek are blended. Therefore, there is confusion in inheritances.

Animals in Proto-TurkicEdit

  • horse - *ăt[8]
  • foal - *kulum
  • cow - *ingek[9]
  • calf - *buŕagu[10]
  • dog - *it
  • wolf - *bȫrü
  • fox - *tilkü
  • ox - *öküŕ[11]
  • bull - *buka[12]
  • worm - *kūrt
  • bird - *kuĺ
  • small bird - *torgay
  • hawk, falcon - *kïrguy
  • aquila fulva, eagle - *bürküt
  • fish - *bālïk
  • sheatfish - *yāyïn
  • carp - *sāŕgan
  • lion - *arsïlan[13]
  • snake - *yï̄lan
  • mosquito - *siŋek[14]
  • wasp, bee - *ārï
  • beetle - *koŋuŕ
  • insect - *bȫg
  • elk - *bulan
  • he-goat - *teke
  • sheep - *sarïk
  • donkey - *eĺgek (/eĺčgek)

...

Animals have a very wide range in this language. It's not strange at all, considering the years it was spoken.

Next lesson:  Genitive, accusative and dative cases

ReferencesEdit


  1. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/sub
  2. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/%C5%8Dt
  3. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/bu%C4%9Fda#Azerbaijani
  4. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/arpa
  5. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/t%E1%BA%A1r%C3%AF-g
  6. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/yumurtka
  7. a b https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/%DA%86%DB%8C%D9%84%D9%83#Ottoman_Turkish
  8. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/at
  9. [1]
  10. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/bu%C5%95agu
  11. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/%C3%B6k%C3%BC%C5%95
  12. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/buka
  13. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aslan
  14. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Turkic/si%C5%8Bek