History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Publications/Wireless Weekly/Issues/1928 03 30

Link to Issue PDF edit

WorldRadioHistory.com's scan of Australasian Radio World - Vol. 01 No. 04 - August 1936 has been utilised to create the partial content for this page and can be downloaded at this link to further extend the content and enable further text correction of this issue: ARW 1936 08

In general, only content which is required for other articles in this Wikibook has been entered here and text corrected. The material has been extensively used, inter alia, for compilation of biographical articles, radio club articles and station articles.

P.01 - Front Page edit

WIRELESS WEEKLY Broadcast Programmes a Week in advance VOLUME I I Registered at the G.P.0., Sydney, for transmission by Dost as a Newspaper. NUMBER 23 Friday, March 30, 1928 Price Threepence


o 4 COMBINED I ACCUMULATOR CHARGER II 11111111111111 l w; i; 1 m ii in

i !'i|

, ' *\'l I its II

  • 5

\ \oav;v.v- : K:::!:v.iss:n AND now comes still another Philips Battery Charger —this time to aid the man who has both accumulator “A” and “B” Batteries. We make no sensational claims for the No. 1009, but merely say that it is an honest to goodness Charger that will keep both accumulators in first-class trim, —year in, year out. Of course all the features of the by-now famous « FOUR-FIFTY " are incorporated. A unique switching device, by which at a turn of the “ wrist, “A” or “B" battery is charged at will, lends simplicity to its other sterling qualities. Let your nearest Radio Dealer give you further ticulars. SOLD BY EVERY RADIO DEALER P> INI 111 Ilia 111 RADIO APPARATUS S'*"* vs M >


i he Popularity of RADIOKES QUALITY KITS Has been amply demonstrated at the Radio Exhibition. R. F Chokes , 8, 6 each Almost everyone of Radio importance from City, Country, and even Interstate has visited stand No. 20 in Great Hall, to offer us their congratulations and enthusiastically tell us of the wonderful results they are obtaining from Radiokes equipment. We invite you. If you have not already visited us at Stand No. 20, you still have a few days left in which to do so. We shall be pleased to meet you and talk Radiokes. Come along and view our latest range of products—there are included some new kits which you have not yet seen. %0-day-m.every good set Hfia SuT-'j&MjS, Amperite 6j9 each Metropolitan Electric Co. Ltd standar <* s circuit Tuner , i4\6 e«. 27-29 King Street, Sydney. Ever Popular Browning Drake £2 per Kit. Standard Neutrodyne £111216 This year’s greatest favourite range 15-130 metres, 55/- per kit


L &a> m has arrived m n u JUST PLUG INTO THE LIGHT SOCKET and switch on the current. A 5 Valve Genuine Neutrodyne Set that is unsurpassed in simplicity, selectivity and beauty. It looks like, sounds like—and IS “The Rolls Royce of Radio” On view at the Radio Exhibition March 21-31, at Stand No. 1 left hand side of the vestibule, Town Hall, Sidney. The all Electric Gilfillan Console can be purchased on remarkably Easy Terms. Wet or Dry Batteries Accumulators Trickle Chargers Price complete with accessories including Loud Speaker £69/10/- cs “Goodwill built on Public Confidence since 1889.” 386 George Street, Sydney Wholesale Warehouse : 213 Clarence St., Sydney Also at: Katoomba, Newcastle, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Wellington (N.Z.), Auckland (N.Z.).


WIRELESS WEEKLY VOL. 11. No. 23. FRIDAY, 20th MARCH, 1928. The Various Uses of Radio THOSE of us intimately connected with the broadcasting business are apt to forget that there is any other radio service. Broadcasting has taken up such a large share of public attention and interest, and the industry has developed to such proportions, that any other use of radio is more or less overlooked. Although no branch of the science of wireless transmission has made such progress, broadcasting is not the only wireless service. Many people regard the transmissions from 3LO, Melbourne, as not only the principal, but actually the only kind of use to which the science of electromagnetic radiation is applied. It is the most spectacular demonstration of the science, and the best known; but there are other applications, and some of them are of greater importance than broadcasting. The first use to which wireless was put, as far back as 1904, is still the most important, and the most valuable. Wireless communication between ships and stations or land, coast or short stations, was established for the purpose of assisting in lifesaving work. It was soon recognised that there was no substitute for wireless as a means of calling from one ship to another, or to the shore station for assistance in times of distress or danger. The importance of this service to shipping led to the first international radio conference to lay down the conditions relating to the “distress call” or S.O.S. procedure. Practically every ship of every nation of a tonnage of 1600 tons, now, is obliged to carry wireless, and to listen for the S.O.S. call, so as to be in a position to render assistance if required. Wireless for defence purposes followed quickly on the commercial application to ships; and in the last great war wireless signalling and direction finding were very important factors in naval warfare. They were on land and in the air, too, for that matter; and many interesting stories are told of the indispensability of wireless communication. In peace as in war wireless is a big factor in defenece orginsation, navy, military and aviation. We are all familiar now with the. beam service to England. That use of wireless was regarded a few years ago as a dream. The practicability of which was many years from fulfilment. Now it is so successful that it has caused considerable worry and embarrassment to government and company owned cable systems. Not only has wireless proved a strong competition with cables; it has provided communication service in places where no other communication was practicable. Even on land its usefulness in this regard has been demonstrated. There are places in many countries where the establishment of wire services, telegraph or telephone, would be too expensive; but the installation of wireless stations has been the means of giving settlers and others a communication service with the outside world. There are even more “domestic” uses of wireless by police, fire stations and irrigation dam authorities. Whether or not wireless telephony will ever replace wire telephony is a very big guess; but the advance of wireless is certainly wide and rapid.


Catching Up with themWireless World. By R. E. CORDER. THE CHILDREN still throng to Mark Foys to be entertained by Uncle George of 2GB. Many parents also come along to enjoy the weekly entertainment, which is held every Saturday morning. AS AN AID towards minimising “mike” fright, the British Broadcasting Company has tried converting its Studio into a small theatre, complete with audience and spotlights. The system is said to be a success. “I DON’T like plain cake,” said the parson to Johnny, aged five. • “I like cake that has a lot of currants and sultanas in it. What kind of cake do you call that?” “High fwequency cuwwent cake,” said Johnny, knowingly. THE FIRST maßn to dabble in B eliminators got the shock of his life. While demonstrating a Leyden jar in 1745, Peter Van Musschen Broock charged the jar with static electricity, and then dared to touch the terminals. He was instantly and effectually eliminated as an experimenter for the remainder of that day., COMMUNICATION was established with fourteen amateur stations in six states from an aeroplane dying in Canada recently, as a result of tests planned by local radio experts. The greatest two way distance covered was with two amateurs in Oakmont, Pa., 500 miles away. Communication was maintained for an hour and a half whilst the craft was in the air. WHAT is believed to be a unique record in direct long distance communication was established recently when a message was transmitted almost from the South to the North Pole. It was a signal on 33 metres from the 3 kilowatt transmitter of a whaling ship in the South Pacific. The Bergen radio station on the west coast of Norway received the ’Message. It is figured that this message travelled 7000 nautical miles, or more than 8000 land miles. Eggs: “What’s the idea of the ladder effect on an aerial?” Ham: “That’s to help the signals climb up easier!” AMERICAN AMATEURS from district clubs and name them in various manners. A few of them are, “Browsville Racket Raisers,” “I Tappa Key,” “Busted Valve Club,” etc. The “Rag Chewers’ Club” is also well known as a branch has been formed in Australia. “HE NEARLY WAGGED Ns tail off,” wrote William J. Nelson, to Uncle Bas. The incident occurred when Uncle Bas called Mick, the dog. He pricked his ears up at the speaker as his name was mentioned, and when Uncle Bas whistled him, his bark drowned the loud speaker—and he nearly wagged his tail off with delight. MR. LLOYD-GEORGE and his daughter have given wireless sets to the North Wales Blind School at Rhyl, England. A WELL-KNOWN valve firm, advertising in “The Wireless World” (a British periodical), claims that the filaments of their valves are strong enough to hang pictures on, and are long enough to dry the week’s washing. IN SPITE of some opposition, the workhouses, one by one, throughout England, are being equipped with broadcast receivers. The latest is at Chesterfield, where the Guardians have decided to install apparatus in the infirmary and workhouse at an estimated cost of £290. MOVIE STARS are great radio fans, it would appear from a checkmade of the Los Angeles Evening Express Station KNX telephone calls. At least 25 per cent, of the hundreds of calls that come in requesting favorite pieces are from motion picture actors and actresses. IT HAS BEEN found that Canberra, the seat of the Federal Government, is almost a dead spot for radio reception. Canberra is 207 miles from Sydney, and is thus within the range of both Sydney and Melbourne stations, yet owners of even five and six valvers complain of bad reception, in which fading and static play no small part. Interruption is also very troublesome, but this can be accounted for by the huge powerhouse at Eastlake, ana also to the power lines running about Canberra. Further, the innumerable electrical machines, used in roadmaking and excavating, are likely to cause trouble. Several well-known personages at Canberra have smashed their wireless sets, or returned them, in disgust, and one official of the Federal Capital Commission smashed his five-valve set to pieces, and bought a pianola. Incidentally, his set was constructed specially to suit Canberra conditions. OLD TIME NIGHT. (By “Mintie.”) The old time tunes are stealing On the air from 3LO; Gay mazurkas, polkas, waltzes, From the misty long ago. How they cling about our heartstrings. Happy days we used to know, Come again in all their glory On the air, from 3LO. When perhaps the only ballroom Was a barn, but oh, how sweet Looked the lady of our dreamings, With her dainty tripping feet. And we thought the years had stolen All those joys we used to know, Till they came back with “Old Time Night” On the air, from 3LO.


Radio Exhibition Reviewed The completely electrified receiver has arrived\ We saw it at the Radio Exhibition. We also saw chassis-built and drum control sets , dynamic speakers , and photo-electric cells , but saw little evidence of the amateur experimenter —a new age of radio has arrived Refinements in electrically-operated receivers, compactness of design, and general adoption of the single-tuning control, are the outstanding developments revealed in an analysis of new radio styles on display last week, at the Radio Exhibition, in the Town Hall, Sydney. Fittingly, it has been said that radio engineers, interior decorators, and artists have worked hand in hand in developing the 1928 receiving sets. Last year, many people hesitated to buy light-socket sets, because of the contention that this type of instrument was in the experimental stage. Those who visited the Exhibition last weeks found about 30 per cent, of the new sets were electrified, and the other 70 per cent, designed to operate with batteries. The exhibitors say • that those desirous of purchasing batteryless receivers need not fear that the 1928 circuits are in the experimental stage, or that this type of set will require too frequent servicing. They contend that the development of new alternating current valves, and improvements made in rectifier valves, have made practical the building of dependable light-socket sets. However, it would be well for radio purchasers to be guided by the advice of a merchandiser’s oracle which recently sounded a warning to dealers, advising that they should proceed with caution in stocking alternating current receivers. “Consider the system employed, the construction of the unit, and the integrity of the manufacturer,” is the suggestion. This is excellent advice, to follow, not only. for dealers, but for the public buying any type of radio set, whether it be electrically or battery operated. It is expected that next year the percentage of electrical sets will be greater. However, there is no doubt that there will be a large demand for battery-operated receivers for many years to come, because the electric facilities are not available in every home. The great advantage of the light-socket set is in the fact that its power supply is available by the snap of a house lighting switch. Furthermore, there are no batteries to charge or replace, and the power supply is constant. The advantages pointed out for the batteries are “pure direct current, steady, quiet, noiseless, uniform operation, taking nothing from and adding nothing to radio reception —no line troubles or blown-out fuses can stop reception—-you need never miss a single concert from a battery- run receiver.” There is a large assortment of “A” and “B” eliminators, which enable sets designed for battery-operated Valves to take their power supply from the light-socket. To go a step further, the combination power «m--plifier-“B” eliminator has been developed. These devices plug into the receiving circuit after the first audio amplifier valve. They supply the “B” voltage for the set, and act as a power amplifier, which gives excellent tonal quality, and intensity that can be regulated from a whisper to volume sufficient to fill a large auditorium. The last audio valve in the set, which is generally of the power type, is not required when this instrument is employed. The metal chassis and shielding of circuits in individual compartments have been adopted on a general scale. The drum-control method of tuning is more popular than ever, because it affords the single adjustment which simplifies tuning. Tke wave-length readings appear through a tiny window, or slit in the panel. The old style of external dial is rapidly vanishing, and, within a year or two, it is likely to be an antique, along with the crystal set, which was popular in the early days of broadcasting. The old loud-speaker, with the horn, has also surrendered its popularity to the disk or cone loud-speaker, except in cases where a long air chamber or “exponential” type of horn is used that is entirely different from the old type of horn. The long air chamber horns, some of which measure as much as seven feet, give exceptional tonal quality, as do the latest cone designs . It was said last year that radio apparatus had been “simplified, standardised and made foolproof.” Refinements in instruments have enabled further simplification in construction and manipulation of the circuits; cooperation between the manufacturers and availability of patents have aided in further standardisation more sturdy construction and the lessens learned from having equipment Li use for another year have helped engineers to see how they can build the sets more foolproof. Thus the 1928 models are not likely to need the frequent attention of a service man. One of the largest and most interesting exhibits was that of the Railway and Tramway Department. This exhibit formed portion of a comprehensive display made by the Public Supply Authorities of N.S.W., at the instigation of the electrical branch of the Sydney division of the Institute of Engineers of Australia. Among the exhibits was shown a standard electric suburban railway carriage frame fitted with motors and electrical accessories, all of which were in action, the running wheels being packed above the rails. Other exhibits in operation show the automatic signalling apparatus (with which model trains are employed), interlocking apparatus, automatic telephones, high speed circuit breakers, and a large capacity oil switch, wire reclaiming machines, electric welders, coil forming and taping apparatus. The Randwick testing laboratories, in addition to many other laboratory instruments, showed an alarm device operated by interrupting and light ray falling upon a photo-electric cell. There was also a burglar alarm relay device, which sounded warning when, the safe was touched —no matter how lightly. Outside the exhibit and apart from receivers and components the 20-k.w. short wave transmitter used for Empire broadcasts, which was shown by Amalgamated Wireless, attracted the most attention.


The Electric Home, built to full scale, and complete with every electrical device, was the star exhibit in the Electrical Section. In it there was, in addition to the usual electric light and radiator service, electric fans, radio receiver, electric washing machine and copper, electric iron, bath and heater, and electric hot water service, cooking range, electric saucepan, kettle, griller, toaster, percolator, and special house telephone, and vacuum cleaner. The Amateur Experiments exhibit was smaller this year than in 1927 evidence that the Radio Exhibition is becoming more and more a manufacturers’ business, and less experimental. The Ham exhibit, though smaller, was no less interesting than previous showings. The novelty sets showed less originality than intricate workmanship and were noticeable for their complete finished quality; they will be described at some length and commented upon in the April “Radio.” Stand 1. The variety and workmanship of the Gilfillan Neutrodynes on view at Harringtons’ stand attracted most enthusiasts. The completeness and compact neatness of the smaller all-electric console model was outstanding among the new year receivers. The Radio and Gramophone Model and the large drawing-room receiver, were excellent in workmanship, both inside and out. Stand 2. The Lawrence and Hansen Co. confined their exhibit on Stand 2 to Wireless Accessories and Sets. Prominent was the range of British Sterling Loud Speakers. There were also several new models of Sterling Speakers, together with types already popular on the Australian market. Stand S. A comprehensive display by Messrs. Bennett and Wood of a wide variety of components, including the C.A.V. loudspeaker, batteries, etc., and the Stewart Warner matched receivers, attracted attention here. Stand 3a. The' new magnetic cones and the power dynamic speakers employing the floating cone principal, operated from a |6 volt accumulator, or the house mains, drew many curious eyes at Mick Simmons’ stand. These loudspeakers reproduce faithfully, the whole of the musical sounds or frequencies emitted by the broadcasting stations. The power loudspeakers are housed in a special cabinet, so that they can be moved from room to room. This feature is very desirable when required for dance functions. Mick Simmons are also featuring an electric Radio Phonograph combination. It is made possible by the use of the Magnavox Power Speaker, used in conjunction with a Magnavox 6 Valve Radio Set—electrically equipped, and a Bosch Record Pick-up. Stand 3a stood out among the rest for the manner in which it silently advocated better reproduction. Stand 4. The Australian General Electric Co. exhibited a wide range of R.C.A. receivers. Visitors found special interest in the Model 30A R.C.A. Receiver, which .is an 8-valve super-heterodyne receiver operating direct from A.C. current. The Custom-built Cabinet of this receiver gives it an appearance that is only equalled by its performance. The R.C.A. Receiver Model 32 is another super-heterodyne A.C. operated receiver. Built 'into its cabinet" fs the famous R.C.A. power speaker model 104. It brings in all Inter-state stations in full loudspeaker strength. The Model 28 8-valve super-heterodyne set is operated by dry batteries, while the 17 is a 6-valve A.C. operated set, which in its compactness and simplicity is twelve-months ahead of anything of its kind. Most attractive of all, however, was the neat Model 16—a 6-valve receiver that gives astonishing volume on long-distance reception, and is the last word in compactness and simplicity. The radio exhibit is concluded with Model 104 and 100 A. R.C.A, loudspeakers, the former being a!power speaker employing its own

P.06 - Technical Editors Reflections edit

Technical Editors Reflections.

THERE is no doubt about Progress! The world continues on its orbit through the vast universe, bearing on its continents its countless populations. Those populations may be apathetic to evolution in many cases, but in the great majority is a craving for a better scientific knowledge. It is impossible to retard Progress; and the Radio and Electrical Exhibition, at the Sydney Town Hall, is evidence of man’s progressiveness, and, what is particularly pleasing, evidence of the advancement of Australia in Radio and Electrical Science. What a contrast to the exhibition of two years ago! Many receiving instruments exhibited in 1926 were considered the last word; but to-day, they would not be tolerated. The Australian Radio manufacturer has risen to the occasion, by providing for his public, at a price available to all, instruments which are simple in operation, extremely efficient, and, in addition, a beautiful piece of household furniture! In fact, I quite believe that many housewives will probably turn down one instrument for another because the colour or design of the cabinet does not match the new Axminster carpet! As in the motor car trade, so with Radio. Productions are so excellent that the fair sex is the deciding factor in many cases! It is irrepressible for me to compare this exhibition with others of bygone days, including the majesty of Wembley in 1924. There is something strongly reminiscent of Wembley in the instructive and educative display by the Public Authorities in the lower hall. Shades of the Palace of Engineering! Here one may see and examine the intricacies of the train or tram one rides to business in; complicated railway signalling systems; the operation of the photo-electrical cell; all made possible by the utilisation of the same latent force which has made Radio communication possible, namely the Electron. Radio and Electrical Engineering are like the Siamese Twins; "One is not possible without the other." Exhibitions are truly expressive of mankind's scientific development. During 1924, I well remember Australian visitors to Wembley paying extortionate prices for broadcast receivers which today, in Australia, are valueless. In 1928, they may buy in their own country receivers for a quarter of the price which are at least 200 per cent. more efficient in every way. They are to be seen on every hand in the 1928 Exhibition, in the Sydney Town Hall. Component parts for the home constructor gladden his heart with their engineering skill, and he does not need to dive very far into his pocket to obtain the essential for that super set he has been contemplating. The evolution of the heart of the radio receiver, the valve, is displayed in all its glory on various stands, and it is truly wonderful to compare the modern valve, with its constancy and stability, with its brothers of but a few years ago. Radio has come to stay; and this exhibition will be followed by others in the future, and, wonderful as it is now, one can visualise the rapid advent of Television, when visitors to the exhibition will, in all probability, be able to see actual happenings in far-off countries taking place before their eyes. D. B. KNOCK.

Tags: 2NO - Donald Brader Knock; Wikibooks 2NO; Exhibition Sydney 1928;

valves to amplify the reception, while the latter Model succeeds the famous rModel 100 speaker, to the new principles of which have been added new notable refinements. Stand 5. | Stand 5 was Lawrence and Hanson’s electrical household appliances display. Stand 6. I The Clyde battery stand drew many furious eyes. A complete battery (“assembling bench was on view, and a minature moving picture screen showed the huge. Clyde plant in detail. Radio batteries were represented j by two volt, four volt and six volt series. The two volt series, are designed especially for dull emitter valves, although special connecting links are provided so that either two or three two volt units may be connected together to function as either four volt or six volt batteries. The four volt series is constructed for use with radio sets employing the four [volt type of valves, which are very numerous on the market. . About the most popular type of ( Clyde radio batteries is the 6CR type, a six volt battery intended for 201 A and the other types of valves drawing over four volts on the filament. All of these types of batteries, including car batteries and home-lighting batteries, were on view, and ready for examination. Stand 7. Right opposite Clyde was the Ever-ready stand showing the complete series, including torchlight batteries. All the Ever-ready batteries were made in Sydney, and users of this class of goods like the idea of fresh batteries. Radio batteries, both A, B and C, were well to the fore. Owners of radio sets were interested in the new types of heavy duty and super service B batteries. These were something out of the ordinary, and for them was claimed trouble-free reception and long life. Stand 8. A comprehensive display by the fairly well known Cossor valve firm. Of interest was the? point one series. Stand 9. Devoted mostly to domestic. appliances, Noyes Bros.’ stand held some interest for radio enthusiasts in the Igranie, Brown, Oldham and Columbia goods. It is a pity these are , not more widely known, for there is some good English stuff in them. Stand 10. Wondertone receivers were the principal receivers on view at W. H. Wiles —fairly interesting sets for the prices quoted. Stand 11. The A.W.A. display attracted a great deal of attention. For finish and quality the Australian-built receivers matched any of the imported receivers in the exhibition. In addition to the Radiola standard 6, Senior 6, and Super 8, there were here introduced for the first time, two entirely new models. These were the Radiola Straight Six, a six valve table cabinet instrument for either battery or power socket operation, and the Screened Six, a six valve receiver supplied in handsome floor cabinet and also suitable for either battery or power socket operation. The new models are “Single Control,” tuning being on one dial only. Both types feature the most modern developments in receiver design, and are remarkable for volume and purity of reproduction. In the models using batteries the new Marconi valves are featured. The Screened Six, in addition to the above excellent features, is notable for its selectivity. Special interest also centred around the new Ideal Distortionless Transformer, the Logarithmic (centraline) Condenser, and \ the Non-microphonic Valve Socket, which were manufactured at' the Company’s Works in Sydney. Stand 12. Radiair Receiving Sets on view here are already well known to the public. Stand 13. An impressive display of radio products was shown by New System Telephones Pty., Ltd. Here were seen some of the finest New System model sets, notable both for engineering and the cabinet making. Their tone was delightful, and excellent in respect of both volume and distance. Shielded and chassis built on a cast aluminium frame, and conal bearings. Most luxurious of all was the newly added electric model entirely batteryless, and built in minus the ordinary type of eliminator substitutes. Burgess made a distinctive showing of batteries from the tiny aeroplane size to the Super-navy type. These batteries were exact replicas of those used in the many adventures on land, sea, and in air, for which they have become famous. Neat, new, and of interest to all, was the Acme Socket Power—a “B” battery eliminator of exceptional features. Three types were shown enabling the running of one to 12 valves from alternating or direct house lighting electric current. Stand 14. Anthony Hordern and Sons’ display of domestic appliances and receiving sets. ■ Stand 15. An attractive display of Radio and Electric Domestic Appliances were exhibited by W. G. Watson. The principal item was the new Sonochorde Cone Loudspeaker. This is, indeed, a wonderful reproducer, and every radio enthusiast should look it over. The new Majestic “B” supply unit was also being displayed. This will deliver current for loads up to twelve 201 A tubes or equivalent and brings out the full tonal strength, yet with ample filtering capacity to positively eliminate the A.C. “hum.” The new Handy trickle-Booster charger, the Simplex A and the Ultra Handy A and B Chargers were also shown. Stand 16. Standard Telephones exhibited an enormously powerful loud speaking equipment operating the loudspeakers installed outside the Town Hall, a 10ft. 6in. loudspeaker, part of the above; the latest in super heterodynes; giant water-cooled transmitting valves; typewriters operated by electricity; an automatic private telephone exchange in operation; telephone train controlling equipment; Amateur Section Prizes. 1. Best Amateur designed and built ahort[check spelling] wave receiver, covering the Band from 10 to 80 metres and suitable for reception of both International telegraphy and telephony— -Ist Prize, £4/4/-; 2nd Prize, £l/1/- (1) J. PERCIVAL. (2) G. P. WELLS. The class of workmanship was so high as to gain special prizes for other exhibitors. The Lucky ones wer: W. H. BARKER, and P. FRETTEN, A. K. FALSON, W. NICHOLS, and DIGGER FRANK DOWNS. 2. Best, flexible low power transmitter covering amateur wave hand Ist Prize £7/7/, 2nd Prize £3/3/. (1) J. ATKINSON. (2) E. FANKER, F. HOSKEN tied for this prize. Special prize awarded to Illawarra RADIO CLUB. 3. Best amateur designed and constructed piece off radio apparatus submitted by an amateur radio organisation ; limited to one entry from each competing organisation. Prize: Cup valued at £7/7/-, presented by “Wireless Weekly.” (1) WAVERLEY RADIO CLUB. 4. Best home-constructed piece of apparatus other than a complete transmitter or receiver submitted by an individual. Ist Prize £3/3/, 2nd Prize £l/1/. (1.) L. E. DAVIES. (2.) W. NICHOLS. Special prize awarded to W. J. WELL. 5. Most novel crystal set. Ist Prizze £2/2/, 2nd Prize 10/6. (1.) F. WILLIAMS. (2) W. HAYS. 6. Most novel valve set. Ist Prize £3/3/, 2nd Prize £l/1/. x (1.) T. ELEVERLY. (2.) J. WHALEN. Special prize awarded to L. F. STYLE.


vacuum cleaners which clean, mop and polish electrically—a most absorbing display. Stand 17. A shipload of new apparatus was on view at Philips’ stand. Chief among the new valves were the A 635 and A 435, designed to give an exceedingly high amplification of R.F. signals without the need for special stablising and neutralising devices. Used in cascade they can be stablilised by very simple devices on account of their extremely low internal capacity which has been reduced to about 60 per cent, of that usually present in the average valve. Showing also were the new “Mini-watt” Power Valves—B4o9 and 8405 —both for operation from a 4 volt accumulator, and remarkably economical in current consumption. An Audio Transformer—a new product of Philips’ laboratories—was also showing. The overall dimensions of the transformer are small, and the design compact. Practically the whole weight is in the special alloy of which the core is composed, and so careful has been the design that not only is even amplification obtained q from 200 to 10,000 cycles, but there is small possibility of saturation. Ratio is 3 : 1 and if preceded by the Philips’ “Four Fifteen” the average “step up” is 45 per stage. Other apparatus showing included the Philips’ Power Plus B and the B and C., the Philips’ Trickle Charger, and the P.C.J.J. Junior Loudspeaker. Stand 18. Keogh showed an all-electric super set of excellent design, and also a radio-phonograph combination. Some really good Australian-made and moderately-priced receivers. Stand 19. Stromberg Carlson featured their well-known radio receivers, audiola portables, jewell measuring instruments and tube checkers, general radio laboratory instruments, kester radio solder, beanco[check spelling] radio arresters, etc. The 5 and 6 valve shielded neutrodynes, with or without loop operation, and operated wholly from the electric light socket were interesting. Stand 20. Metropolitan Electric Co., Ltd., an enterprising concern which is concentrating al its efforts on the manufacture of high-tfjlass radio-frequency components, and various types of coils, tuners, and coil kits for inclusion in receivers embracing modern efficient circuits, addressed its exhibit mainly to the home constructor and experimenter who assembles his own receivers. Various receiving sets were on show to illustrate the method ®f utilising these excellent coil kits. Enquiring amateurs were shown and had explained to them the intricacies of kits for such popular and up to the minute circuts as the short wave, 1928 Browning-Drake, Perridyne, Solodyne, Triplex Circloid-de- Luxe, and three stage Radiokes-Freshman type. Stand 21. Everything dear to the heart of the radio enthusiast was handsomely displayed by Manufacturers’ Products Pty., Ltd. Emmco radio parts are already well known to the radio public, but as it is possible that some people had not previously inspected the latest lines, a full display of which was given on the stand. The ABC eliminators and “B” battery eliminators interested to those who had not yet fitted these instruments to their receivers. The ABC eliminators are made in two types, one to function with valves to take .25 amps, on the filament, and one with .06 amps, on the filament. The super power elminator shown is designed for eliminating “B” batteries in multi-valve sets, while the regular “B” battery elminator functions with sets having up to 5 valves. Among these Emmco products was also to be seen the Two Dial Drum Control, three different makes of Emmco transformer, several lines of condensers, headphones, Emmco-stads, etc. There was also a comprehensive showing of Airzone and Baldwin products. Stand 22. Australian Westinghouse Electric Co. displayed household appliances here. Stand 23. Burginphone receivers with many new features. Stand 24. Colville Moore with a showing of receivers of excellent quality and moderately priced. Most of this company’s apparatus is already well know to radio enthusiasts, but new models with improvements attracted considerable attention. Stand 25. Hecla Electric’s domestic and house-hold appliances. Stand 26. Amateur exhibit previously commented upon. Stand 27. The new Amplion cone and cabinet speakers with the exception of the more elaborate and costly dynamic speakers constituted the finest display of reproducing units in the show. The Chippendale mahogany model and the Jacobean oak model were remarkable for their cabinet work, as well as their reproductive qualities. The absence of over ornamentation and the strong lines of the designs are in fine taste. The new cones and the hanging models are cheaper, but only! because of less detail in the workmanship not because of inferior reproduction. Stand 28. Mullard linked up with Ferranti' here in a display of valves complete! in every way. Mullard valves are noted for their low consumption of current, and since the introduction of dull-emitter valves, they have always: been the leaders in producing valves' of this type. A complete range of Mullard transmitting valves from 5 watt up to the Silica valves of 6000 watts intermittent dissipation were shown. Mullards are an entirely! British organisation, and their valves! are entirely made at their factory at Balham, London. They pride themselves on the fact that they are of British origin. Ferranti displayed transformers, j Stand 33. The big American firm’s wide range of receivers were on view here.! Beautiful in appearance, with simplicity of design and sturdiness of construction, the Model 35 Six Valve One; Dial Receiver stood out from the rest. The cabinet of the Model 32 Seven Valve Receiver is of solid mahogany, finished in rich dark brown. The front panel is of metal with a brown mat surface, which brings out the sparkling sheen of the brown bake-] lite dial and rheostat knobs. Nameplate, battery switch and vernier knob are all of gold plate. All together this combination of colors and finishes gives to the Model 32 truly an air of unobtrusive elegance. Stand 35. G. C. Beardsmore here with the new TE KA DE Valves. Sets of varied types employing the new TE KA DE valves were displayed and shown in course of construction. One of these sets which commanded attention was the TE KA DE 1-valve receiver, which gives full loudspeaker reception. Other sets of interest, such as Neutrodyne, Reinartz, etc., in course of construction and completed, go to'make a display of interest to both the home constructor and listener in. At intervals during the evenings an exhibit of a radio mechanic at work will be given, and he will be only too pleased to give information and assistance to inquirers. Stands 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 34a, 35a, 36, 37, etc., were devoted to electrical apparatus and public displays.


The Safety Valve Readers are urged to express their opinion on matters pertaining to broadcasting. If you have some grievance, if you have some constructive criticism to offer, here is your chance Jor expression—your safety valve. The editor assumes no responsibility for statements made by readers and published on this page, as opinions of correspondents do not represent our editorial policies or beliefs. Anonymous letters are not considered. THE MORE THEY ARE TOGETHER. Dear Sir, —I recently purchased a wireless set; with much pride it was installed, and I settled myself in a comfortable chair, earphones in place, and commenced to twirl the different knobs. Stations came fast and furious. What I heard was something like this: “Station 2FC, Sydney. Mr. Gopops will now speak on . . ‘the night .1 bid theeeeee farewell’ . . at the Flemington saleyards . . I can honestly say without prejudice . . cod fish sold for 85/- per basket. . . . aaaaand while theee pale moon gleamed above . . Boracic got a headlock on Mikel, with a mighty heave of his shoulders . . . Mr. De Valve will sing, ‘The Lass with a Delicate Air’ . . one of our most promising filles. . . In connection with 3LO’s competition. . . the Newtown Band will play, ‘Just We Two’ . . followed by a description of the motor racing from the Manly Band Rotunda . . 2BL, Sydney, broadcasting, we are now changing over to . . “The Bonnie Bank of Loch Lomond’ . while the price of lead remains at nineteen pounds ten . . . and I will say in conclusion . . God Save the King. , , good-night, gooooood night.” Yours, etc., H. MASON.

  • .

SUGGESTS YEARLY VOTE. Dear Sir, —I have noticed quite a number of letters appearing in “Wireless Weekly” lately in regard to church services being broadcast. I am against any reduction being made in the services that are now broad- cast. It was only a few weeks ago that you took a vote through your valuable paper, and the greater number were satisfied to go on having the services broadcast, just as they are doing. It now seems that one or two want to control the programmes, and have the companies put on programmes for their selfish ends. I think the public are well catered for in jazz music, without bringing it in on Sundays. To those people who are not satisfied with the Sunday programmes, I say they are not sports. I like the religious programmes, but if the voting had shown in favor of alteration, I would have taken it as a sport and said nothing. I say the companies—2BL and 2FC, would be doing an injustice to the greater number of listeners if they made any alteration without having another vote, which I feel sure would count in favor of religion. I would suggest a vote every 12 months, and be satisfied. I am, Yours, etc., G. WODSON. Hamilton. ♦ : CO-OPERATION IMPOSSIBLE. Dear Sir, —The letter of B.V.R.G. in “Wireless Weekly” under the heading, “Why not Sunday Co-operation between 2FC and 2BL?” is evidently the product of very little consideration, and it seems to me that such opinions as his are clearly indicative of selfishness and are decidedly ungenerous. There are many thousands of people in N.S.W. who enjoy the sacred services on a Sunday more than any other feature of the broad- cast programmes. Surely, then, these people may be permitted to have their wishes recognised on one day in the week, considering that the other six days are devoted entirely to secular programmes. B.V.R.G. is evidently not a church-goer, and does not appear to sympathise with the religious section of the community. I would like him to remember, however, that in the outback portions of this State and others where there are no churches to attend, the services broadcast on a Sunday are greatly appreciated and relished by those who justly realise that some devotion is necessary in their lives. In these modern times there are many, of course, who are apt to forget about religion, but they must not forget that there are still living many elderly people who belong to a more devotional generation than that of the present day. Many of these with increasing age find much pleasure in listening to the broadcast services. 8.V.R.G., also, was possibly in a state of oblivion when writing his letter, since he seems to regard the religious section of the community as a single body employing the same system of devotion. He fails to remember that this one body consists of the adherents of several vastly different denominations. Many listeners-in are generally very particular as to what kind of service they are listening to. It would be surprising if one were to find a Roman Catholic listening to a Methodist service were one being broadcast from a church of his own denomination. The same applies to the Baptists, Congregationalists, Anglicans and Presbyterians. Hence, 8.V.R.G., I hope, will understand that where he cannot observe any co-operation between 2FC and 2BL on a Sunday, nevertheless it undoubtedly exists. If he looks at the respective programmes of the two “A” class stations on a Sunday, he will invariably find that the services broadcast differ ' in denominational respects. Were one of these services abolished it would mean that probable dissatisfaction would arise amongst the disfavored denominations. B.V.R.G. also says that an extremely optimistic estimate of the number of church-goers in N.S.W. is one per cent, of the population. I certainly question the reliability of the source of his information in this respect. I have reason to believe that at the very lowest five per cent, of the population attend church services regularly. To sum up, I think it would be a gross injustice to abolish one of the church services on a Sunday. If B.V.R.G. is not satisfied with the amount of secular entertainment he receives, I suggest that some of the tiring race results should be cut out and other items introduced in their place. Personally, I find a good deal of variation in the Sunday programmes, as both 2FC and 2BL regularly have band items and studio concerts interspersed between the religious services, or introduced when the services are over. Yours, etc., R.S.L.R. Burwood.


B. O'Brien's Letter Raises Safety Valve Storm 2FC FOR EVER. BEYOND UNDERSTANDING. Dear Sir, —After reading and rereading B. O’Brien’s letter (“Wireless Weekly” 16/3/28), I must still state that I cannot see his point yet; the letter resolves itself into a lot of rot to me. Firstly, he says that he departs from the usual of “receivers, and how to get the best out of them.” Well when did he write on this subject. I do remember his letter on improved 4QG, yet in this one he calls them the worst station in the Commonwealth. This was the letter in which he described himself as an experimenter because he works a 4 valve set. But what I cannot understand is that he states that 2FC’s wave has been increased one or two metres. Now this would actually make 2FC on 444 metres and 3AR on 484, and yet he says that he cannot separate them with a difference of 40 metres separating the two. Then he complains that they are received 4 degrees apart on his set. Can he blame the stations for that? B. O’Brien states that on his set 4 degrees on the condenser is equal to 40 metres. Now, therefore, 2 metres will equal 1/5 of a sixteenth of an inch, which is I-80th of an inch. Now, how can he tell of any increase in 2FC’s wavelength on these conditions. He says his set is selective, yet it cannot separate stations 40 degrees apart. Personally, if ever it did happen that I had trouble with my Browning-Drake, it would not be B. O’Brien that I would get advice from. Yours faithfully, “COMMON SENSE.” Sydney. — 2FC STRONG AND CLEAR. Dear Sir, —In answer to Mr. O’Brien’s letter concerning 2FC, I have been tuning in this station regularly for the past nine months and have so far failed to notice any alteration in their wavelength, and have had no trouble with distortion from their transmission. I consider them equal to 3LO, these two stations being miles ahead of all others, their daylight reception being exceptionally strong and clear. Perhaps Mr. O’Brien finds more trouble on account of being closer to 2FC, as I can tune in 4YA, Dunedin, which is situated between 2FC and 3AR, without any interference, which shows there is a big gap on the dial between the two latter stations. I use a King 6 Neutrodyne. Yours, etc., E.C.C. Bethungra, N.S.W. Dear Sir, —The letter of your correspondent, B. O’Brien, rouses me to take up the cudgels on behalf of 2FC, it being our experience that 2FC is easily the best and most reliable station for transmission, and our opinion that its programmes, on the average, are of a higher standard than those of 3LO, which periodically slips badly with quite inferior artists, and also interrupts its evening programmes with too many domestic announcements of interest only to Melbourne listeners, which might better be given before 2 p.m. Also one is inclined to think that that locality is responsible for his complaint of blurred reception (as with us 2BL is liable to this fault), and surely his set is responsible for the seeming varying wavelength, not the least variation being noticed here for the past nine months—3Aß coming in absolutely distinctly; in fact, one could not confuse them if one tried. Yours, etc., (Signed) A. E. COWLEY (Mrs.) Stanthorpe. Q. , + SCRAP B-D SET. Dear Sir, —Re Mr. B. O’Brien’s complaint that 2F*C wanders from its wave-length a little, and that reception from that station is “Blurred,” etc., also that it interferes with 3AR. From these, and other complaints, and statements made, I think B. O’Brien has wandered not a little, but quite a lot, off his “wavelength.” He goes on to say that listeners may think his set is not working correctly, and I think they would be quite in order, by saying so, when he makes such statements as the following. He says, 4QG has the worst modulation in the Commonwealth, yet his set brings it in perfectly, and every word (although distorted) is heard and clearly understood. If distorted, how in the name of goodness, is the reception “perfect.” He also states 2FC have “probably” increased their wavelength one or two metres (according to his set, I take it), and they interfere with 3AR. Even if the wavelength has varied (on his set), 2 metres, he still has 40 metres between the two stations. All I can say to this so called “interference,” Mr. O’Brien, is “scrap” your B.D. set, or have it remodelled. If all sets required over 40 metres to separate stations, we would want a tolerably large waveband to accommodate a few B.C. stations. Mr. O’Brien goes on to say the B.D. is sensitive and selective. Well built, it certainly is sensitive, but selective, no. It is the great weakness of the B-Drake. He certainly contradicts his own statement by saying he gets interference between 2FC and 3AR with at least 40 metres between them. “Nuff” said about selectivity. About 3LO being the “best” station in the Commonwealth, that, Mr. O’Brien, is quite a matter of opinion, and even if so (on your set), why not “listen in” to them, and not worry about 2FC and their “wandering wavelength.” By the way, did you ever try a “wave trap,” they are undoubtedly an acquisition on sets that are "broad” in the tuning “if you get a good one.” Yours, etc., Selectivity. Leura. • —♦ ORDER OF BUREAUCRATS. Dear Sir, —In this week’s issue appears a very pertinent letter by Robt. C. Wren. I, also, wrote to the Listeners’ League, 12 months ago, and am still awaiting a reply. I will be only too pleased to join Mr. Wren in a live contemporary, for it is necessary that something be done to wake up and shake up the Sydney Studio Managers. They have become autocrats and bureaucrats of the first order, and progress to them is anathema. Just look at the sopranos they engage. There is not one really first-class singer. One or two are passable, but the remainder would never dare to appear on a public platform. In the studio, they are safe from the anger of the audience. When will the managers learn that relays from theatres are absolute rot. Firstly, unless they have several microphones in different parts of the wings, one cannot follow the voices. Secondly, the laughter of the audience is distracting to radio listeners; and, thirdly, musical comedies are written for the eye, and not the ear. On top of that, 2FC have broadcast one act of the “Girl Friend” five times. Further, why do they engage anyone who happens to come along with a “short talk,” regardless of the voice? Some of the lecturers, particularly women, have no idea of how to speak before a microphone; these same people cannot speak into a telephone, and think the louder they shout the sweeter their voices will be. Do you know, Sir, that three years ago, the programmes from 2FC were 50 per cent, better than to-day? Yours, etc., W. YOUNG.


Early April Attractions at 3LO. THOSE who go away for the Easter holidays, and those who stay at home, will only have to tune in 3LO to pass away many happy and interesting hours. Campers, the boarding-house crowd and the family circle will find the special Easter holiday programmes most acceptable. The sacredness of Easter will not be overlooked by 3LO, and full arrangements have been made to ensure for listeners every opportunity for being present in spirit, if not in person, at the special services in the big Melbourne churches. On the musical side, adequate provision will be made for dancers (an important consideration with weekenders at the seaside, in the country, and at home), and for lovers of choral and solo singing. The instrumental representation will be strong, too, so listeners are assured of a wealth and variety of musical programmes during Easter. Easter, too, is an occasion for big sporting events, chief among which rank racing and athletics. The big Doncaster meeting on Sydney on Easter Saturday, and the Cup meeting on the Monday, will be fully recorded by 3LO, and other important fixtures will be fitted in. So, from the wireless aspect, anyway, listeners who tune in 3LO can rest assured of their every need being satisfied. RAILWAYS INSTITUTE ORCHESTRA: The Victorian Railways Institute Orchestra will broadcast from 3LO on the evening of Wednesday, April 11th. ELSTERNWICK CHOIR ON THE AIR: The Elsternwick Methodist Male Choir will sing from SLO on the night of Wednesday, April 11th. This popular choir is well known to listeners. OPERA SINGERS TO BROADCAST: Galloway and Hayden, members of J. C. Williamson’s No. 2 Opera Company, will begin a brief season at 3LO on Monday, April Bth. Both are gifted singers, and listeners should be sure to make a special note of the times of their appearances. LUMSDEN, THE WHISPERING BARITONE: Jack Lumsden, the whispering baritone, of Tivoli fame, will begin a season at 3LO on April Bth. He has won his way into the hearts of vaudeville fans, as he will do into the hearts of listeners on the air. rnvSi SUNDAY AFTERNOON CONCERTS: The Sonora Sunday afternoon concerts, from 2 to 3, con-mue to meet with general approval, the programme for April 8 is especially interesting. Famous composers,and all the latest releases, are featured in these concerts. SfUCIA L GOOD FRIDAY PROGRAMMES: Appropriate programmes will be broadcast from 3LO on Good Friday, April 6th. Special services wnl be held in all the churches, and 3LO will arrange for country listeners to be present in spirit at- them, through the medium of wireless. THERE IS ALWAYS some new feature in the women’s hour broadcast from 3LO from 11 till 12 every morning, and this accounts largely for the popularity of the now firmly-established service. It is the women’s own special wireless programme. During April there will be a series of talks on “Domestic Architecture” by women architects. Every phase of this most interesting subject will be touched upon by experts who know their work, and the things that women want to know. Another series of talks on Child Welfare will be given by leading kindergarten workers during the same months, and promises to be equally interesting. These are two subjects which should add to the popularity of an already indispensible feature. Mr. E. F. Retter, entertainer and violinist, who is to broadcast from 3LO a series of versions of great stories. IT IS HOPED that those two popular noveltv stars, Rupert Hazell and t jls * e Da y, who made such a hit with dLO listeners a little while ago, will return for a season at the studio. Roth 3LO and listeners would be delighted if they did, and they might,too. Listeners are advised to watch out for further announcements. and parents all over Victoria are watching the seeds given away in the special 3LO packets develop into plants. In this most interesting feature, every child received a packet of assorted seeds with a birthday card, and parents were allowed to join in the fun if they applied by letter, enclosing a lid. stamp. 3LO has done much in this way to stimulate interest in gardening. THE SUCCESSFUL world range short wave tests being conducted by 3LO have interested wireless listeners in all parts of the world. That is a plain statement of fact, and it is not surprising that among the shoals of leters received from overseas there are some of outstanding interest. One of these arrived in the last mail from France, and, how the staff wished Opperman was about to translate it for them, for it was in French! Then the studio manager (Mr. Bearup) came on the scene, and he gave the staff a surprise, for he read the letter as easily as if French were his native tongue.. Which just goes to prove that being a wireless studio manager requires more than a vast knowledge of wireless and business problems. j MISS AGNES FORTUNE (popularly known as SLO’s Miss-Fortune), the well-known accompanist at 3LO, Melbourne, has returned to her Steinway at the studio, after spending a pleasant holiday at the seaside. Letters in Every Language. It is an interesting experience to dip into the foreign mail bag of 3LO. Letters in many languages are received, and require elucidation. All are evidence of the pleasure the writers have received since 3LO began to cater for long-range listeners. This short-range weekly programme of 3LO has had a distinct technical advantage. Countless listeners have written their acknowledgments. Australia has become a real country, rather than a legendary land, since these experiments have proved so successful.


Notes on the Women’s Session By Mrs. Jordan of 2BL O-DAY I met over two hundred of my listeners who each came laden with entries for our Women’s Section Exhibit at the Radio Exhibition. It will be very difficult for the Judges to decide which is the best Fruit cake, for the entries sent in this afternoon are excellent. The sponge sandwich is beyond reproach, and has been made with great care and skill. Dozens of jars of preserves and jellies prove that our housewives have taken full advantage of the glut in fruit. The needlework section of the Exhibit indicates that Dorcas still holds pride of place in the home, some of the entries are among the best that have ever been exhibited in Sydney at any show. The best example of this Art has been sent in by an Invalid at Waterfall, who has been bed ridden all her life. This is a piece of Roman Cut, which is as nearly perfect as human hands can make. The sweets exhibit is one of the best in the show. It comprises candied lemon and orange peel, candied figs; marsipan fruits of all varieties. One courageous entrant has arranged a breakfast, eggs and bacon, all of Marsipan. No one should miss seeing this very wonderful exhibit. Poker-work trays, vases and collar boxes are displayed in the Arts and Craft Section, and purses and bags made from crepe paper rope. The women declare that their entries are sent in “as a tribute to Mrs Jordan,” and I am very grateful to them. FOOD VALUES AND WHAT THEY ARE AND HOW TO CALCULATE THEM. Three days in each week we have discussion on the subject of food and its value as fuel, as a body builder; and how the different kinds of 4 food fill these needs. Without having a knowledge of the three known Vitamines or any other accessory Food Factor, still, we believe the average housewife needs only to be reminded of the fact that a varied diet of fruit, milk, and wheat, will provide the various body building foods necessary for the children’s health. We are inclined to agree with the old Philosopher who says, “there seemed to be something necessary to life in that part of the husk of the wheat grain which appears in whole meal bread, and not in white.” There are many ingredients in diet important to appetite, and most of us would lose a great part of our interest in food if they were not there. Miss Kathleen Jordan , daughter of Mrs. Jordan, who talks on sweet-making at 2BL. WATCH YOUR WEIGHT. For the benefit of the many Listeners who are worried about their weight, the following table will be helpful. This information is not for the thin woman, I am not particularly interested in her, for I cannot get her point of view, how anyone who is thin can want to alter her condition is beyond my comprehension. This is a simple method which may be used to calculate your weight, your ideal weight, I should say, if you have no table available:— Multiply the number of your inches over sft. by and add 110. Example: sft. 4ins. —4 by 5 \ equals 22; add 110, equals 132, or 9st. 61bs. Find what your weight should be, according to your height, and “Watch Your Calories.” SAFETY FIRST. Dr. Harvey Sutton, Chief Medical Officer of the Educational, is giving very helpful and instructive lectures from our Session. He is at the moment giving a series of talks on Infective Diseases. We are told how to prevent and check infection. There is now no need for whole families to be “down” with Measles and Whooping Cough. The most simple and easy methods are advised. Next week we shall be listening to a talk on “Safety First.” Mothers of young children should not miss any of these very useful talks, which are given each Wednesday at 11.$0. ‘SWEETMAKING” interests all parents who manage to find a little time to manufacture these dainties. Miss Kathleen Jordan, daughter of Mrs. Jordan, who manages the Women’s Session at 2BL, is ably carrying out the necessary instructions for sweetmaking from 2BL every Friday, from 3.30 to 4 p.m. Interest has increased since it was announced that prizes are to be given for the best manufactured sweets which will be shown at the Radio Exhibition. Three separate prizes are offered for this class, whilst Mrs. Jordan herself is running a similar competition for jam, embroidery, preserves, lacquer, raffia, batik, crepe work, scissor painting, cakes, etc., etc. Letters have been received from intending competitors as far away as Queensland. One lady,, writing to Miss Jordan, says:—“Owing to a very severe storm here this afternoon it was impossible to listen-in to your very interesting and valuable talks on sweetmaking. I am so sorry I missed your recipes and hints, as I am looking forward to entering for the competition, and as the sweets must be made tbe recipes you broadcast, I am feeling a bit lost. I do not like to ask you to give your talk over again, as it must be very tiring for you, and also for the listeners that managed to receive the recipes. “I thought perhaps some kind person might let me have to-day’s recipes. Am I asking too much, and is it a terrible thing to do? I am trying to save your valuable time, and am so very interested.” Another lady writing asks: —“I have made the fondant; now, what shall I do with it, c: what could I make out of it, please?” Then “Dolores” writes:—“As I cannot always listen-in to your delightful talks, Miss Jordan, I should be glad if you could give me further information regarding the ‘Sweets Exhibit’ at the forthcoming Radio Exhibition; also, please let me know whether exhibits become the property of the competitor. My aunt would like to send in her effort in the ‘Preserves’ section. I will be waiting for a reply on Friday next, at 3 p.m., as usual. I have been very successful with recipes, which we enjoy very much. “Wishing you and 2BL all you would wish for yourselves, I am, etc., Dolores.” “I would like to enter for the three different sweetmaking competitions,” writes another enthusiast. “Not,” she adds, “that I am greedy, but the more the merrier!”


It' s All in the Air Coming Features in the Broadcasting Programmes HOLY WEEK MUSIC. THE feature of the special programme of holy week music, to be broadcast by 2FC from St. Francis Church, Albion-street, on Palm Sunday evening, Ist April, is William Byrd’s “Turbarum Voces.” Byrd holds an unchallenged dignity among the leading polyphonists of England. With Palestrina, Vittoria, Lasso, Gibbons, Lotti, Tallis, etc., his genius commands international recognition. He has been 'criticised severely for indulging in license in composition which was anathema to his continental contemporaries, but in this respect, he followed the practice of the English school which preceded him. It is remarkable that though his life extended so far into the 17th century, he remained entirely untouched by the changed ideas which inspired the Italian vogue after the death of Palestrina. In all his work there is a strong individuality, and the dignity and poignant beauty of his Latin music is one of his most attractive characterises. “Turbarum Voces” (the yells of the rabble clamoring after the death of Christ) is a setting for three voices of the fourteen choral portions of the Passion of Our Lord, according to St John xviii-xix., 1-24. The opening chorus portrays Christ in the Garden, confronting and confusing His enemies. The succeeding numbers feature the tyranny of a maddened mob stampeding the craven irresolution of Pilate. The final chorus leaves the murderers at the foot of the Cross, gambling for the garments of the crucified Redeemer. This classic example of polyphonic construction will be rendered by St. Francis choir, under the conductorship of Rev. G. Ellis Herlihy, who directed the singing at the Eucharistic Congress rehearsal at Erskineville, on Sunday, 4th March. The choir has some very fine performances to its credit, and the well-merited position it now holds is due entirely to his artistic musicianship and untiring effort. The artists assisting are Oliver King, soloist Philharmonic Societies, Sydney and Melbourne, and Kathleen Fitzgerald. The programme will be directed by Mr. T. Talty. « —- TEACHERS’ ANNUAL CONFERENCE: Cyril Monk will deliver a short address in connection with the forthcoming Teachers’ Conference, which is held annually, from 2FC Studio, on evening of Friday, 30th March. The Rev. Father E. Ellis Herlihy, who will conduct the St. Francis Choir when they are broadcast from 2FC shortly. MADAME ADA BAKER’S PUPILS are coming along to 2FC Studio on evening of 30th March to amuse the children. The “littlest broadcaster,” Joan Punch, will, of course, have a special message for her countless small radio friends. THE LADY WHO hides behind the nom de plume of “E.H. of Erskineville,” is emphatic that Church services shall not be curtailed. In her opinion, this is a transmission eminently suited to the three Sunday sessions. That she listens regularly is evidenced by the fact that on Monday morning along comes a postal note for 1/ to 2FC to be sent to the ecclesiastical body she names. Apparently her appreciation scorns the proverbial “threepence for the plate.” She is not denominational, but flits from one sect to another with equal generosity. POSSESSING a delightfully rich soprano voice of great power, Miss Vylma Mai, who has been entertaining thousands of listeners from 3AR Studio, has had rather a rapid rise in musical circles considering she is not yet out of her ’teens. During her brief musical career she has appeared before the footlights in many Melbourne Theatres and teachers of voice production, who have heard her sing, predict a very promising future. Some day Miss Mai is hoping to leave Australia’s shores, for the purpose of studying under the leading masters of the world. THE COMPETITION conducted by Miss H. J. Beegling in the Women’s Session resulted in over 200 letters being received from all over the State, on the subject, “How to be happy though married”—two prizes were awarded; the Ist an open order for £2/2/, won by Mrs. E. M. Stelzer, “Mozart,” Collaroy, and the 2nd an open order for £l/1/ to Mrs. Vere Boothman, 28 Dardanelles St., Mortdale. Talks from this station for the coming week, at 10.30 each morning, include “Care of the Feet,” by Mr. Dodds; “Arts and Crafts,” by Miss James; “Beauty Hints,” by Madame Esperance; the usual shopping guide, cooking recipes, Hollywood news, and other entertaining chats, by Miss Beegling, of Station 2GB. Any suggestions, recipes or hints will be welcomed by Miss Beegling; write to her c/o the studio. The winning letters will be read over the air from this station on Thursday evening, March 22nd, about 8.20 p.m. ALICE OF WONDERLAND: Commencing from Wednesday, March 28, Miss A. M. Shepherd, known to all listeners as “Alice of Wonderland,” will give a further supply of her fascinating animal and nature stories from 3AR. After years of seeking and delving into myth, folklore and the natural habits and conditions of many of our animals, insects, flowers, trees, fruit and stones, this Story Wizard links fact and fable together with artistic beauty classic to everyday life and common objects. Thus, interest, beauty and knowledge are gained from things of the daily round and common task. The creatures about us are lifted into our lives and the loneliness we all feel at times can be dispelled by the cry of a bird, a look from a pet, the beauty of a flower or even a change of wind, for all these things are linked with us from the cradle to the grave in legends such as Miss Shepherd demonstrates in her strange, rare stories, fairy tales and birthday greetings, are also woven into the Magic Cave Stories by “Alice of Wonderland.” A DEVICE that can be used as a fixed crystal, a transmitter microphone, an amplifier, a telephone, a stethoscope, a hand microphone, a» phonograph amplifier, a morse code practicing device, a talking light, a submarine signaller, a detector, a grid leak, loud-speaker transmission, and for hundreds of other useful andi interesting experiments, is now on sale in America priced at 4/ each.


The Manufacture of Modern Radio Valves. The Automatic Grid-Making Machine. By F. E. BUCKELL (Manager, Osram Valve Dept., British General Electric Co., Ltd., Sydney). EVENTS change rapidly in the World of Radio, but probably nothing has changed more rapidly during the last few years than the design and methods of manufacture of thermonic valves. Only a few years ago the bright emitter type of receiving valve was reckoned on being the ideal valve for all kinds of reception; to-day there are, at a conservative estimate, some hundred odd types of receiving valves on the market. The old bright emitter of a few years ago took some three hours to make; to-day a valve is made in about half an hour. Anybody visiting a modern valve works would be amazed at the improvements effected during the past four years; anodes that used to be blanked out by hand are now made in thousands by automatic machines at several hundred per hour; grids that used to be made by hand with great care are now wound, spot welded at every turn by automatic machines; exhausting valves by bombardment for two hours or more has given way to machine pumping and high frequency gear to volatilise the “getter,” which produces highly exhausted valves at the rate of 200 or so in an hour. Whilst on the subject of exhausting or pumping it may interest readers to know that the silver coating on the inside of the modern radio valve is the result of the volatilisation of the magnesium getter, which gives the valve an extra high degree of vacuum—and not for effect as perhaps may be supposed. Nearly all receiving valves are of similar construction—that is to say, they consist of an electrode system, mounted on support wires, which pass through a glass seal or “pinch,” the whole arrangement being contained in a glass bulb which is exhausted as completely as possible of air. The electrodes are usually three in number—the filament, anode and grid, The filament emission is obtained either from the filament itself, as in the case of the bright emitter, by raising it to a high state of incandescence, or in the case of the modern valves form a coating on the filament, the filament in this case acting merely as a heater of the coating, The glass operations in valve making are similar to those used in the manufacture of electric lamps. A length of glass tube is fed into a machine which simultaneously cuts the tube into short lengths and forms a flange at one end. This “flange” is placed in another machine, together with the exhaust stem and the requisite number of leading-in wires,


•which may number from four to nine; the wires are then fused into a glass “pinch.” During the fusing operation air pressure applied down the exhaust stem blows a hole through one side of the “pinch,” thus leaving an exit for the gases during exhausting. This is how the "pipless” effect is obtained; the stem being subsequently sealed off below the flange and hidden inside the base of the valve. The four leading-in wires are of copper and are soldered to the legs of the base; the inner wires are usually made of nickel and carry the electrodes. The small central portion which is fused into the “pinch” 'consists of wire designed to have the same co-efficient of expansion as the glass into which they are fused. The whole thing is known as the “seal” or “foot,” and it now remains to assemble the grid, filament and anode on this seal. When the electrodes are assembled, the “foot” is sealed into the bulb, the neck of which is melted by gas flames around the flange and any excess of glass is blown clear; the valve is then ready for exhausting. The machine employed for exhausting consists of a circular manifold carrying a number of rubber connections, into which are placed the stems of the valves to be exhausted. The rubber connections are connected to a system of pumps in such a manner that as the manifold moves round, each valve is subjected to a more and more intense degree of exhaustion. 1 valves at the same time pass through a gas oven maintained at a temperature of 400 deg. C. to 450 deg. C., which has the effect of expelling from the glass parts any gases contained by them—particularly water vapour which has a disastrous effect on the emission of dull emitters. By the time the valve has reached the end of the circuit the gas pressure inside is of the order of 0.01 m.m. of mercury; there is even at this pressure too much gas left In the valve. In order to clean up this remaining gas the magnesium previously attached to the anode is volatilised by H.F. currents driving off any gas which is left, and condensing on the wall of the bulb, leaving a gas pressure of about 0.0001 m.m. of Mercury. which is a sufficiently “hard” vacuum for our purpose. The valve is then sealed off below the flange” and the base is fitted by Che application of cement, baked in a small electric oven, fitted over the base. The subsequent treatment depends upon the nature of the valve. A bright emitter need only be run for a short time at slightly more than normal voltage, whereas a dull emitter valve requires certain electrical treatment to produce the standard of emission required. Some coated filament types of valves are treated during exhausting to free the coating substance of gas and leave a pure uncontaminated emissive surface. It only remains now to test the valve for emission, vacuum, filament current and characteristic slope. The vacuum is measured by applying a fairly high positive voltage to the plate and varying the negative grid volts, with a sensitive galvanometer in the grid-filament circuit; if the valve is soft it shows a current of microamps, but a hard valve shows practically no reverse grid current at all. A View of the Pinch Making Machine.


V Good Reasons Why You Should Build This Valve Quality Radio 1. IT’S CHEAP TO BUILD. 2. IT REPRODUCES PERFECTLY. 3. IT GETS LONG DISTANCE. 4. IT’S SELECTIVE IN OPERATION 5. ITS ECONOMICAL ON BATTERIES. 6. IT’S EASY TO BUILD ALL BRASS, Parts for Building The Quality 6 In this Issue— £ s. 1 High Grade Polished Hard Rubber Panel, 24 x 7 x 3-16 .. 0 8 1 High Grade Polished Hard Rubber Sub-panel, 24 x 7 x 3-16 0 8 1 Radiokes “Bayer” Coil Kit, Complete 1 5 2 “Eco” All Brass Straight line Separation Condensers, 10/- 1 0 2 Pilot “Art” Ornamental Vernier Dials, 7/6 0 15 1 Bakelite Arrow Knob, for reaction Control 0 1 1 High Grade Single Circuit Jack, fantail connections .... 0 1 1 Pair Brass, Nickelled Sub-panel Brackets 0 3 6 Kelford Anti-vibration UX Pattern Sockets, 3/- 0 18 1 Electrad Phasatrol 0 17 1 B.M.S. Push-Pull “A” Battery Switch 0 1 4 Brachstat Ballasts, to Suit Valves, 4/9 0 19 2 Wetless Mica Fixed Condensers, .0001 and .001, 1/6 0 3 1 Wetless Mica Grid Condenser and Gridleak 0 2 3 Electrodyne .006 Fixed Condensers, .006, 3/6 0 10 3 .25 Megom Gridleaks, 2/- 0 6 3 Special 100,000 ohm. Resistors, at 3/6 0 10 1 Philmore 2 Megohm Gridleak 0 1 7 Gridleak Holders, 1/- 0 7 9 Engraved Terminals and Bakelite Strip 0 3 1 Doz. Round Buswire, lid.; 3 doz. Copper Lugs, 6d 0 1 d. I 6 I 6 i 0 i ( I 7 6 0 6 6 0 0 9 6 0 6 0 0 6 5 i This List of Guaranteed Parts Cost ... £9 4 9 ■ u■ —* ns —■H M —»« 6 The ‘‘Eco” Condenser Straight Line Separation. One hole fixing. All Brass Construction. Removable Spindle. .0005. Price 10/- .00035. Price 8/9 COUNTRY CLIENTS.—Our parts are absolutely guaranteed to give satisfaction. Send your orders to us conditionally that your money is refunded if you are not satisfied with the goods upon receipt of same. Goods must be returned to us within ten days. pay Carriage on all Orders of 10/- and over, except on Speakers, Cabinets, Batteries, and Value Payable Post Parcels. For QUICK SERVICE address Mail Orders to ECONOMIC RADIO STORES, Terms Cash with Order, or Valuable Payable Post. No discounts. Valves—no responsibility unless fragile postage rates are paid by purchaser. 492 George Street, SYDNEY. “YOURS FOR LOWER PRICES AND SERVICE THAT SATISFIES.” THE ECONOMIC RADIO STORES PARR VMATTA: Cor. Macquarie and Church Sts. ’Phone: UW 9601. SYDNEY: 25 NEW ROYAL ARCADE, ’Phone: M 6138. NEWCASTLE: No. 13 Union St. 'Phone: New. 1622.


THE QUALITY SIX WE have at times pointed out the desirability of quality of reproduction in any broadcast receiver in preference to quantity. Gone are those days when Mr. Jones would try to outdo Mr. Smith, by placing the loud speaker outside the window and letting it blare forth a distorted amount of undesirable volume. That sort of thing was available, due to transformers which were made when Wireless was very much in its infancy, and valves were of poor construction with appalling characteristics. Wireless as a science is still very much in its infancy, but now in 1928, we have transformers which do transform, and with faithful quality of tone. Also, valves have reached a stage when there is virtually “A valve for every socket.” These components are well within the pocket of “the man in the street,” but yet in many cases, we still hear home constructed receivers giving out anything but music or natural speech. How often do I hear the cynical “expert” friend of the family say, “Oh, that is the fault of the broadcasting station itself.” Whereas such a thing could be possible, yet our broadcast engineers have reached a stage where a hundred per cent, efficiency is their slogan, and that is maintained, so that our “expert friend” is actually very unfair to the owner of that set, by laying the blame with the origin of the signal. There are many causes of distortion, which are but there are a few main causes which should first be looked to, Primarily; transformers are the delinquents, and although you may have fitted transformers of unimpeachable reputation, yet there are things that happen “is? the best of families.” A transformer may be suspected and hauled out of the set. A test will show continuity in the windings and that transformer is put back into the set. Now it so happens occasionally, that one or two turns of the primary or secondary will be shorting, but yet the winding is continuous. The result is that the shorted turns set up small eddy currents which lead to distortion in the final reproduction. It is not normally possible or convenient to disintegrate the transformer so that the only remedy is a new component. Now the question of unsuitable grid biasing arises. It is possible that the constructor has inadvertently reversed his C battery, which will immediately result in distortion with a great lo'ss of strength. Also, too high a negative bias will produce the same effect. Always bias valves according to the makers’ instructions, and if doubtful about this, find the best position yourself. Valves are of paramount importance in avoiding distortion by using the correct valve for each position. For instance, Radio frequency amplifying valves should always be of high impedance, although in certain cases there are exceptions to the rule. This applies mainly to Reflex circuits. Resistance capacity amplifiers should also be of high impedance, and audio amplifiers of low impedance. The detector valve impedance should be in the neighbourhood of 7,000 ohms. All this dissertation on transformers and valves may appear boring to the reader, but it all leads up to the why and wherefore of the Quality Six. This receiver has been designed mainly with a view to faithful tone reproduction and at the same time with no sacrifice of distance getting properties. It is exceptional in that it introduces a stage of resistance coupled Radio Frequency Amplification which in itself is untuned—but far from being an idle passenger in the set. The detector is followed by three stages of resistance capacity coupled audio amplification. This form of audio amplification at once precludes the possibility of defective or unsuitable transformer coupling, and the resultant volume is very little if any, less than two transformer LIST OF PARTS FOR THE QUALITY SIX. Although the parts listed below and mentioned throughout the articles were those actually used by us in the receiver described, it must be pointed out that it is not absolutely essential that they be rigidly adhered to. Other parts of similar quality and technical values should function quite satisfactorily. 1 Dilecto Formica hard rubber panel, 24 x 8 x 3-16 in. 1 Uilecto, Formica sub-panel, 23 x 8 x 3-16 in. 1 Radiokes Bayer Coil Kit. 2 Advance or Emmco SLF Condensers, .0005 mfd. 2 Vernier Dials. 1 Small Knob for Standard Spindles. 1 Battery Switch. 1 Single Circuit Jack. 2 Benjamin Sub-panel Brackets. 6 Benjamin UX Valve Sockets. 1 Phasatrol (Electrad) 1 . 4 Amperites or Brachstats to suit Valves used. 1 .0001 Fixed Condenser. 1 .00025 Grid Condenser and 2 meg. Leak. 1 .001 Fixed Condenser. 3 .006 Fixed Condensers. 3 .25 meg. Resistances. 3 .1 meg. Resistances. 1 .2 meg. Leak. 14 Clips for Grid Leak Mounting. 9 Moulded Top Terminals. Reel of 16 tinned copper or Celatsite (Glazite) Wire. Assorted l-Bin. Screws and Nuts.


coupled stages. The resistance coupled R.F. stage increases the selectivity of this conventional circuit to an astounding degree so that at once we have before us a highly desirable and efficient receiver of quite low cost. This Resistance R.F. stage uses a Phasatrol and while it has been stated that resistance coupling is unsuitable at high frequencies, yet it was found to be of enormous value when used with a Phasatrol. No trouble whatsoever with uncontrollable oscillation was found and neutralisation or' balancing in any form was found to be entirely superfluous. Actually, the Phasatrol is not used as a suppressor or oscillation preventer, but owing to its containing a variable resistance—it was found that any degree of selectivity could be obtained. In different localities—different aspects of selectivity are required so that the Quality Six is desirable both for the congested area or the localities far removed from the broadcast station. A receiver used, say in Coogee, would require slightly broader tuning if used in North Sydney, owing to its removal from interference of the “shock excitation” type. The regenerative Detector following the resistance R.F. stage will give sufficient sensitivity to bring in inter-state stations at comfortable strength. Do not expect the long distance results of the Super or the Solodyne from the Quality Six—by this I mean that its range is limited to inter-state reception. It is something, however, to have a receiver which clears up that “night distortion” on inter-State signals to no small extent. The circuit diagram will show that there is nothing “awe-inspiring” about it. Merely a straightforward job; but making for tone amplification. The coils (Ll-L2) (L3-L4-L5) consist of a Radiokes Bayer coil kit, although other kits of which there are many suitable, could be used. In series with the aerial is a fixed condenser C 3 of .0001 mfd. This condenser is not actually necessary, but may possibly be found a useful adjunct if situated under the broadcasting stations’ aerial! L 3 is the primary coil of the 3 circuit portion of the Bayer Kit. L 2 the secondary and L 3 the reaction coil. L 3 is variable in the usual way for control of regeneration. There are actually only two tuning controls—Condensers Cl and C 2, which are of .0005 mfd. each. These condensers should be of the “straight line frequency” type, and in the instrument built here for readers’ edification, the condensers were of the Gecophone slow motion SLF type. These Gecophone condensers are of high quality and incomparable in their vernier action. Do not get the idea that other condensers will not do however. There are many inexpensive and excellent productions now on the market, out of which I recommend “Advance” or “Emmco.” A receiver of this type demands good condensers with a good control so that it will be advisable to use a good smooth running vernier dial with the condensers. The resistance capacity coupling units for the audio stages are built up separately by the use of Electrad double clip mountings and .006 coupling condensers. The plate resistances have a value of .1 meg. and the grid resistances of .25 meg. Between the Ist and 2nd R.E. stages is shown the Phasatrol marked P and indicated “in situ” by dotted lines around the unit. Incidentally, if the reader wishes to avoid constructing his own resistance amplifier units—there are some excellent resistance coupling units manufactured by Philips, which would be eminently suited to this receiver. In “Radio” for March—a special amplifier featuring the Philips units, is described with the 1928 Browning Drake. The why and wherefore of resistance amplification is fully discussed with the amplifier. No variable rheostats are provided in this receiver, and in each case the valves are controlled by means of automatic ballasting resistances of the Amperite or Brachstat type according to the valves used. The two R.F. valves are provided with independent resistances, and also the detector. The three audio amplifiers are controlled by one common resistance, so that in all, four automatic resistances are required. In the grid circuit of the second R.F. valve actuated through the Phasatrol is a 2 megohm grid leak connected to the A negative supply. In order to avoid crowding, a large front panel measuring 24 x 8 inches is used, and to facilitate wiring, a sub-panel measuring 23 x 8 inches. There are actually on the front panel only two controls, the left hand vernier dial controlling condenser Cl in the R.F. stages, and the


right hand condenser C 2 in the closed or detector circuit. The regeneration control is placed in between these two, and will be found necessary only for long distance reception. Below the sub-panel and to the left of Cl is the battery switch. In a similar position and to the right of C 2 is the single circuit jack for the output to the loud speaker. First of all lay out the panel according to the template building diagram and centrepunch each marking. Drill the panel for the 5 holes necessary for the controls, etc., and attach the panel to the sub-panel by means of sub-panel brackets of the Benjamin or Airzone type. In order to avoid any unbightly appearance on the panel front by projecting screw heads from the brackets, it is best to countersink the holes for the small screws and use countersunk headed screws. After the two panels are mounted the heads of the screws may be touched over with black lacquer. Mount the two condensers Cl and C 2 in their respective positions, and the coil unit (L 3, L 4 and L 5). This unit is mounted by means of a one hole fixing, and should be arranged as shown on the back of panel diagram. The position of each component on the sub-panel is clearly shown in this diagram. The aerial coupling and R.F. coils LI and L 2 are arranged at right angles to the inter-stage transformers L 3, L 4, L 5, and placed on the extreme left of the sub- panel looking from the front of the receiver. The first five valve sockets are placed in line with adequate space to allow for the mounting of the Phasatrol between the first two valves. Also, space must be left for the resistance capacity coupling units between the audio amplifier sockets. The last audio socket is placed out of line and towards the front panel on the right. The ballasting resistances are placed adjacent to the first four sockets as shown. Although the wiring to the battery switch and the single circuit jack is plainly indicated in the diagram, it should be understood that these two components are underneath the sub-panel. Nine moulded top terminals will be required for aerial, earth, and battery connections, and are arranged on the back edge of the sub-panel. From left to right these are respectively, aerial, earth, A positive, A negative, B negative, C positive, C negative, B positive 90, B positive 135. All the components, such as LI and L 2; valve sockets, Phasatrol, clips for capacity resistances, etc., are mounted on the sub-panel by means of small screws and nuts. Each component must be placed in position and marked off preparatory to drilling. By tho use of a sub-panel, not only is the wiring more simple and more efficient,* but the completed receiver is much more worthy of the name than the usual haphazardly constructed baseboard model. Having completed the mounting, let us proceed with the wiring. Most of the wiring is done by drilling small holes by the terminals of each component and running the 16’s tinned copper wire down through the sub-panel. All joints should be soldered and even where such components as intervalve transformers are provided with binding posts, it is far preferable to place a soldering tag under the nut and screw it down hard, afterward soldering the lead to the tag. To make the finished instrument look like an engineering job. the 16’s wire should have lengths of insulating sleeving,. or “spaghetti” slipped over each wire. It is a difficult process for a novice to make all his wiring bends exactly at right-angles and to keep his wiring neat and straight, and I have often seen the veriest' tyro admirably camouflage indifferent wiring by means of “spaghetti.” This, by the way, is not by any means advice to “skimp” a job as only the best of work should be put into any wireless receiver, even if it be only a modest crystal set. An alternative may be used in the form of Celatsite or Glazite, which consists of very finely stranded tinned copper wire covered with various colours of sleeve insulation. This wire is very easy to work and the various circuits may be worked in different colours for easy identification. Soldering is here worth a word or two. Do not ever make a joint in a doubtful sort of way and then “kid” yourself that it is a good electrical joint. The chances are that the surface of the wire was to a very slight degree corroded and any amount of soldering flux will not help without properly cleaning the joint. Prove it to yourself by pulling on the joint with a pair of flat nosed pliers. A poorly made joint may result in a perplexed reader writing to ask an already harassed Technical Editor a query which would have been entirely unnecessary if a little more care and forethought had been exercised. The filament circuits should be wired up first, and where a receiver uses a battery switch instead of a combination jack always wire up the filament lead with this switch-in circuit first. This is apt to be overlooked otherwise, until the last. Start from the A positive terminal and run a lead to one side of the battery switch and through this switch to the positive terminal of each valve socket. The terminals A


negative, B negative and C positive, are linked together on the sub-panel, and a lead is taken from these to one side of the .25 megohm resistors, in the first and second amplifiers, and also to one side of the ballasting resistance controlling the three audio amplifiers. This lead continues from the audio portion of the receiver, to one side of the by-pass condenser C 5 .001 mfd. to one side of the ballasting resistance for the detector valve filament. This is also joined to the rotor plates of condenser C 2, and thence to terminal F of coil L 4. From here it continues to one side of each ballasting resistance in both R.F. stages, and to one side of the two megohm leak in the grid circuit of the second R.F. valve, and thence to the rotor plates of condenser Cl, and terminal F of the R.F. coil L 2. The C negative terminal is connected to one side of the .25 meg. resistance in the grid circuit of the last amplifier. From the B positive 90 terminal, run a lead to the B terminal of coil L 3and to the B positive terminal of the Phasatrol unit. Nex* link together the negative filament terminals of the three audio amplifiers and continue this to the other side of the ballasting resistance controlling these valves. The grid of the last audio amplifier is now connected to the other side of the .25 megohm resistance, and one side of the coupling condenser CB, .00 mfd. the other side of this condenser, connects' to the plate of the second valve and to one side of the .1 megohm resistance. From the grid of the second valve connect up in a similar way one side of C 7 and the other side of the .25 megohm resistance. Deal with the first audio amplifier similarly. The open sides of the three .1 megohm resistances are now connected together and joined to the B positive 135 terminal, and one side of the single circuit jack. The other side of this jack is connected to the plate of the last valve. Now link up the other side of the by-pass condenser C 5 of terminal B of the reaction coil and the other side of condenser C 6 plus the .1 megohm resistance in the first stage. The other side of the reaction coil is connected to the plate of the detector valve. From the grid terminal of the detector wire in series condenser G 4 with its two megohm leak, which is the grid condenser to the stator plates of condenser C 2 and terminal G of coil L 4. Terminal P of coil L 3 connects to the plate of the second R.F. valve. From the grid of this valve take a lead to the other side of the two megohm leak, and terminal P.C. of the Phasatrol unit. Terminal P of this unit, connects to the plate of the first R.F. valve. From the grid of this valve, connect to the stator plates of condenser Cl and terminal G of the R.F. coil. Now wire up from the aerial terminal to one side of condenser C 3 .0001 mfd. and through thiscondenser to the aerial coupling coil, and th© other side to the earth terminal. This completes the wiring. Now the question of valves arises, 'there are many maxes and types or valves which may be adapted for use with this receiver. Almost any valve of reliable manufacture ana of he correct impedance will be suitable, but those chosen for the purpose were respectively: Osram Ist, K.F. DHiii4lU, 2nd R.F., DEH4IO, detector DEL4IU, Ist amplifier DEE4IO, 2nd DEH4IU, and 3rd DEH4IO or DEL4IO. This combination was found to give excellent results, and it was interesting to note the variation and selectivity by the adjustment of the Phasatrol. Another suitable class of valve are those manufactured by Philips, and a suitable combination is as follows: Ist R.F. A 425, or 435, 2nd R.F. A 425 or 435, detector A 415 first audio A 425, second audio A 425, and last audio 8406. Tuning will be found extremely simple. But before connecting up the batteries, it is well to note that owing to the resistance capacity method of audio amplification employed it is necessary to use a High B battery voltage in the neighborhood of 125 to 135 volts. 90 volts will be found suitable for the R.F. stages, and it should be noted that the detector plate supply is taken through the .1 megohm resistance in the grid plate circuit of the first amplifier. This gives the necessary reduction of voltage for the detector valve. Switch on the receiver and tune by means of the right hand control condenser C 2 when a local station should be heard at considerable volume without any adjustment of regeneration. An adjustment of the left hand dial Cl will bring this combined R.F. stage into resonance when the volume will be materially increased. Do not adjust the Phasatrol on a local station unless absolutely necessary. Tune in to an inter-State station, and adjust the Phasatrol for maximum volume. This should be done by means of a long screwdriver with a wooden handle. The aerial should be about 80ft. long maximum for best results, and as unscreened as possible. No trouble will be found with the operation of the receiver, and the quality of its reproduction will be a pleasure to its user. Finally, if the constructor so desired, he could mount the resistance capacity coupling units underneath the sub-panel, as once mounted, these do not need to be altered in any way. Make sure that the resistances used are constant in their calibration, and for this reason it is advisable to obtain only the best quality. • VIOLINS VALUED AT £12,000. Four violins, valued at £3,000 each, were used recently in a musical art quartet, including Sascha Jacobsen, who broadcast from an American station. The violins are four Strads, purchased by Felix Warburg. <• A DREAM OF EFFICIENCY.. Imagine every A class broadcasting station in Australia being brought together in some form of amalgama- tion or co-operation, so that bands and artists could be transferred, and kept continually on the move in a cir- cuit. Think of the saving of effort and cost of a centralised control of the broadcasting services. Even op- ponents to unification as a principle admit that there are paramount rea- sons for centralisation of wireless broadcasting control, because the decentralisation of operations, and the accruing advantages would by far outweigh the tendency to bureaucratic methods. Overlapping of programme items would be obvi- ated, and the system would result in a one hundred per cent, improved service generally, whilst the benefits to States like Tasmania and West Australia would be incalculable. Leading 2FC Features of the Week THURSDAY, 29th MARCH, 7.4sp.m.—Aero Club —“ The forthcom- ing Aerial Derby.” FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 7.45 p.m.—Cyril Monk—ln connection with the Teachers’ Annual Conference. SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 7.45 p.m.—Dr. T. J. Henry—“A Trip to Juana, Mexico.” SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 6.6 p.m.—Captain Fred Aarons—“Humors of History.” MONDAY. 2nd APRIL, 8.45 p.m.— Speeches from Aero Club Dinner. Henry Silver—“ Graphology.” TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 7.45 p.m.—“Comic Opera Memories.” TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 3.15 p.m.—J. G. Lockley—“Moore Park,” WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 7.45p.m.—D, J. Mares—“ Weather FaL lacies.” THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 7.45 p.m.—Alfred Hill—“ The Teachers’ Conference.”


Two New Accessories THE BOSCH RECREATOR Reproduces Electrically the music of th e Gramophone Record, and will convert you r Phonograph inio a new Musical Instrument. A demonstration will amaze you. Call and hear it. Price £7/10/- THE TYPE 3J5* RAYTHEON“B"ELIMINATOR Sr POWER AMPLIFIER KIT WITH OUTPUT TRAMSTOItMEn General Radio C? Price 50 The Raytheon Eliminator and Power Amplifier Will dispense with all “B” Battery troubles- and the special power amplifier using a UXI7I Valve, will reproduce with extraordinary tone and volume. Hear it at our Showrooms. Price £l6/16- WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE LITERATURE, SCHEDULE OF TERMS, ETC. A Special BARGAIN! 5,000 Copies “Wireless Magazine” Usual Price, 1/5 Copy. OUR PRICE : J 12 Assorted 4d. each 2/11 Postage 4d. per Copy Extra WE have just purchased a large quantity of the well-known hnglish Monthly “Wireless Magazine” (edited by Bernard E. Jones) from the publishers, and at the price of 4d. ea. they are wonderful value. Each number contains inter- esting articles on every phase of wireless, and also excellent technical articles on the construction and operation of sets. Excellently illustrated, and printed on fine paper. THEY WON’T LAST LONG! Write or Call for a Dozen To-day! SWAIN’S (Swain & Co. Ltd- —Established 1895) Radio Dealers, etc. 123 PITT ST., SYDNEY, Near G.P.O.


Technical Points for Listeners ACCUMULATOR terminals should be smeared with vaseline in order to keep them from corroding. WHEN USING a long aerial, the coils on your set should be loose coupled if selectivity is desired. BUS-WIRE is easily soldered, ow- ing to the fact that it is already tinned. A BY-PASS CONDENSER in the plate circuit of the detector valve will improve the operation of your receiver to a great extent. WHEN WINDING coils of the Lorenz type, it is better to dispense with shellac and other insulation com- pounds which add to the dielectric. The simple way to make a coil rigid, is to use a grade of heavy sewing thread, lacing it firmly and tightly. WHEN YOU are out of colder, small joints can often be soldered by using ordinary tinfoil with the usual fluxes. Care should be taken, how- ever, to get enough foil melted down to complete the job,, as owing to its lack ci thickness, there usually is very little metal present. THE USE OF a fixed condenser across the loud-speaker terminals on the set will help to increase the qual- ity of tone, whilst a fixed condenser across the loud-speaker connections will have the effect of eliminating diaphragm rattle and hand capacity noises, such as those produced by touching the speaker cords. WHEN WINDING coils on formers, it is a good idea to insulate them with paraffin wax. This is done by melting a quantity of good paraffin wax (enough to well cover the former), and leave the former in it for about half an hour, during which time it should be baked in the oven. On re- moving, scrape the superfluous wax off. A WIRELESS set capable of “ring- ing up” any person using a suitable receiver, and of receiving calls in the same manner, has now been perfected. The cost of making such a receiver and transmitter is small, construction simple, and all parts afe within reach of the average experimenter. Tele- phony is used for communication in the same way as the ordinary tele- phone. A complete description and an article on the construction of such a set appears in “Radio,” January 15th, 1928. A THIN LAYER of lubricating oil will overcome gassing and pop- ping in the accumulator. THE COUPLING condensers for re- sistance capacity or choke amplifiers should be of the mica type. DID YOU KNOW that though 1 metre has a frequency of 300,000 kilo- cycles, 30,000 metres has only a fre- quency of 10 kilocycles? EXPERIMENTS carried out in order to find the best wavelengths for different times of day show that wavelengths of 26 to 40 metres are suitable when the path between trans- mitter and receiver is in complete darkness; wavelengths of 20 to 26 metres are suitable at times of trans- mission from darkness to daylight and vice-versa, or when the path is partly in daylight and partly in darkness; and wavelengths of 15 to 20 metres are suitable for a total daylight path. PERIODICALLY you should run a rag soaked in kerosene up and down your aerial in order to remove the soot and dust, which make for poor reception. Whilst on the job, don’t forget the insulators, which also col- lect dirt. Contrary to general sup- position it is not advisable to Solder leads to your aerial, for unless a good connection is made without the use of the solder, the resistance of the latter will cause very poor reception. AS SOON as a joint has been sol- dered, it should be wiped over with a clean duster in order to remove the liquefied flux, which is otherwise liable to cause leakage. DISTORTION due to high fre- quency currents getting in on the low frequency side of a receiver may be prevented by the insertion of a high resistance, in series with the grids of low frequency valves. RADIO CONSTRUCTORS who fail to find an error in a set they’ve wired, though they may never have had the same experience before, should re- member what Josh Billings once said: “Success don’t consist in never makin blunders, but in never makin’ the same once twict.” INSULATED aerials are better than plain copper, since the latter are prone to collect soot and dust, and owing to wet weather, will very easily corrode. On the other hand, wire that is enamel or rubber insulated, will not be affected, and this insula- tion will have no effect whatever on the reception of signals. OAK FINISH! Amateurs who build their own cabinets will find that an excellent stain for oak can be made by mixing Japan black and turpentine in equal quantities. The liquid should be applied with a rag to the well-sand-papered surface, and with two or three coats a rich brown coat will be obtained. A SPARE FIXED condenser of .001 mfd. capacity or so, can be used as a safeguard in sets of the Rein- artz type where the voltage of the “B” battery is across the reaction condenser. Simply connect the .001 mfd. condenser in series with the smaller variable condenser, and then if the latter should accidentally be- come shorted, the larger condenser will prevent a short to your battery. SAVING THE LOW NOTES: The sound waves from a loud speaker are not projected evenly. The higher notes go straight forward, while the lower notes tend to go off sideways, and even round towards the back of the instrument. This is referred to as “spilling.” A good plan to eli- minate this trouble is to place the speaker close to, and facing away, from a wall, so that some of those elusive low notes can be reflected again to the front. “O” IS FOR OSCILLATORS. The following verses, pub- lished in the “Radio Times ” (London) , adequately express tiis feelings of most radio "fans” :— The wicked Oscillators The purest waves defile —. Far worse than alligators Stir up the muddy Nile. One of their horrid joys is, When you're trying to get through, To create unearthly noises That start gibbering at you. They fill the atmospherics With rumors fit to freeze — Like Demoyis in hysterics, Or delirious Banshees. If we could be dictators OF these Evil-Doers' fate, We would wrap in Insulators Etheric Agitators, And drop them all down crators Where they'd cease to Oscil- late.

P.23 - Special Exhibition "Radio" edit

SPECIAL EXHIBITION "RADIO." Don’t miss the Special Exhibition Number of "RADIO." The best issue yet published. Strong in technical matter, rich in interest, and light with humour. Printed in two colours and profusely illustrated. The features include:

RAY ALLSOP'S SHORT-WAVE SUPERHETERODYNE. How to make a super-heterodyne which will tune in any short-wave broadcasting station in the world at good loud-speaker strength. A description by the Chief Engineer of 2BL (Ray Allsop, 2YG), of the remarkable shortwave receiver used to pick up and relay the British and foreign stations heard from 2BL. You must see this circuit — it's the best and latest.

THE 1928 BROWNING-DRAKE. A newly-developed and more efficient Browning-Drake of two valves — a regenerative detector and one stage of R.F. as a complete unit with a single control panel arrangement. Separate amplifier units employing either transformer or resistance coupling will be described. By Don B. Knock (2NO).

ADVENTURE YARN BY "BRASSO." Something new. Hi-Jackers and rum-running in the Atlantic. An Aussie brasspounder, a Yank, and the short waves. Best thing yet written by Brasso.

SHORT STORIES HUMOUR ARTICLES. Alarm! A short story about a broadcasting studio — a woman’s intuition—warning — and bush fires. Also, "The Echo of Eden News Service," and "How Noah Got His Weather Reports During the Flood." Humorous drawings by Jack Waring, Mark White, and others. A. S. Cochrane (Hello Man 2FC) on the Bedtime Story. The ideal wavelength for International Broadcasting.

Watch for Special Cover on Bookstalls. On Sale March 19th.

Tags: 2NO - Donald Brader Knock; Wikibooks 2NO; Raymond Cottam Allsop

XXXXXX edit

Ha ve The March ‘Radio ’ Delivered To Your door LI ERE is your opportunity of 1 1 making sure of receiving a copy of the special exhibition issue of RADIO delivered free to your home. See Also Subscription Form on Page 62 You should not miss this issue even if you do not get ‘ RADIO ’ regular- ly, for it contains, in addition to the two leading technical articles of the year, short stories of merit, humorous articles illustrated by the best artists and numerous other features, both important and interesting to radio enthusiasts. PLEASE send post free to the follow- ing address, one copy of the Special Exhibition Number of “RADIO,** for March 21, 1928, for which I enclose 1/1 in stamps.* Fill in, dip out, and forward this coupon to the “Circulation Department, Wireless Newspapers, Ltd., 51 Ca.tlereagh-street, Sydney,” enclosing 1/1 in stamps. A copy of the Special MARCH Issue of “Radio” will be posted to you by return mail. / Name ... . W»; . t*X*s * S*T*' » •*?*: • !•!•*•«

  • . * •]

Address • i«.» *;»:« • . fi«>i [«:*!• •.tw. [•>!• • * wkj • ._. r»i.j •Note.—This places me under no obligation whatever to subscribe regularly to “Radio.”


BROADCASTING PROGRAMMES for the COMING WEEK Friday, March 30 Farmer’s Broadcasting Service. Wave Length, 442 Metres. 2FC, SYDNEY. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10 a.m. —“Big Ben” and announcements. 10.5 a.m. —Studio music. 10.15 a.m. —“Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 10.30 a.m.—Studio music. 10.35. a.m. —A reading. 10.45 a.m.—Studio music. 11 a.m. —“Big Ben.” Stur io music. 11.5 a m. —A.P.A. and Router’s Cables. 11.10 a.m. —Studio music. 11.15 a.m. —A talk on Home Cooking and Re- cipes by Miss Ruth Furst. 11.30 a.m.—Close down. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben” and announcements. 12.2 p.m. —Stock Exchange, first call. 12.3 p.m. —Official weather forecast, rainfall. 12.5 p.m.—Studio music. 12.10 p.m.—Summary of Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 12.15 p.m.—Rugby wireless news. 12.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Weather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news ser- vice. Producers’ Distributing Society’s Report. 1.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1.28 p.m.;—Stock Exihange, second call. 1.30 p.m.—Eileen Moreau, soprano: “Thinking of Y>j” (Coates). 1.34 p.m.—Studio music. 1.55 p.m.—Eileen Moreau, sopraao: “Down Here” (Brahe). 2 p.m. —“Big Ben.” Close down AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements, 8.3 p.m. —The 2FC Instrumental Trio. Leader, Ewart Chappie. 3.13 p.m.—Aldyth Hern, soprano; “Sing, Sing, Blackbird” (Montague Phillips). 3.17 p.m.—Carmen Frey, pianoforte solo. (Pupil of Miss Iris de Cairos Rego.) 3.24 p.m.—Phillipa Alston, soprano: “Morning” (Sper/s). 3.27 p.m. —The 2FC Instrumental Trio. Leader, Ewart Chappie. 8.37 p.m.—Joyce Gillespie, soprano: “Lackaday” (Crampton). 3.40 p.m. —-Carmen Grey, pianoforte solo. (Pupil of Miss Iris de Cairos Rego.) 8.45 p.m.—Aldyth Hern, soprano: "The Market” (Molly Carew). 3.49 p.m.—The 2FC Instrumental Trio. Leader, Ewart Chappie. 4 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Popular records. 4.10 p.m.—Joyce Gillespie, soprano: “Over the Meadow” (Carew). 4.14 p.m.—Carmen Frey, pianoforte «010. (Pupil of Miss Iris de Cairos Rego.) 4.20 p.m.—Pnillipa Alston, soprano: “Beyond the Dawn ’ (Sanderson). 4.24 p.m. —The 2FC Instrumental Trio. Leader, Ewart Chs.pple. 4.35 p.m.—Popular records. 4.45 p.m.—Stock Exchange, third call. 4.47 p.m.—Results of the Cricket Match played in New Zealand tc-day: Australia versus New Zealand. Studio music. 5 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The “Hello Man” talks to the chil- dren. 6.15 p.m.—Story time for the young folk. NOTE: During the Children’s Session the Juvenile PupiLs of Madame Ada Baker will give the follow ng items : 1. Duet, “I Know a Bi nk” (Horn). Bruce and Leslie Penman. 2. Song, “Sun Flakes” (Phillips). Mary Wilson. 3. Monologue, “Peter” (Scott-Gatty). Roma Farrer. 4. Song, “Sonny Mine” (Heibert de Pinna). Jessie Cope-Clegg. 5. Recitations. Little Joan Punch. 6. Song, “Keep on Keeping On” (Long- staffe). Leslie Penman. 7. Recitation, “Little Froggin i ace.” Madge Emerson. 6.30 p.m. —Dinner music. 7 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Late sporting news told by the 2FC Racing Commissioner. 7.10 p.m.—Dalgety’s market reports (wool, wheat and stock). 7.18 p.m. —Fruit and vegetable markets. 7.22 p.m.—Weather and shipping news. 7.26 p.m.—“Evening News” lace news servicd. NIGHT SESSION. 7.40 p.m.—Programme announcements. 7 45 p.m.—Cyril Monk will describe the Music Teachers’ Conference to be held in Sydney at Easter. „ . A , g pm —-Big Ben.” from Her Majesty s Theatre, Pitt Street, S/dney (by permission of J. C. Williamson, Ltd) : The First Act of the Musical Comedy : “The Girl Friend,” produced by Frederick Blackman, featuring Annie Croft. Musical numbers: Scene 1: Overture. Opening chorus, “Step on the Track. Scene 2: “Blue Room,” Annie Croft and Quartette. Scene 3: Opening Chorus, “Boys of Hagerstown. “The Girl Friend,” Lorna Helms and Leo Franklyn. . “I Travel the Road,” Annie Croft. “We must discover that Girl,” Gus Bluett, Reginald Sharland and Frank Leighton. Scenes: 1. A Railway Siding cn the Canadian Pacifl# Railway. 2. In the Dining Car. 3. Lounge of the Hotel Wendell (Evening). 9.12 p.m.—From the Studio: Late weather forecast. The Sydney Instrumental Trio (Lionel Law* son, violin; Gladston Bell, ’cello; and Lindley Evans, piano) : (a) “AllegrV (Arensky). (b) “Scherzo” (Arensky). 9.22 p.m.—“A Seat in the Park.” 9.32 p.m.—Gladstone Bell, ’cello solos. 9.39 p.m.—A. G. Ellis, baritone: Two numbers from the Song Cycle: “In • Brahmin Garden”: (a) “Ganges Boat Song” (Knlght-Logan). (b) “Krishna’s Lament” (Knight-Logan). 9.46 p.m.—Lindley Evans, pianoforte solos: (a) “The Cathedral under the Sea” (De- bussy). (b) “Sequidillas” (Albeniz). 9.55 p.m.—Glady Evans, soprano : (a) Aria from “La Cena delle Beffe” (Gior- dano). (b) “Autumn” (Landon Ronald). 10.3 p.m.—Lionel Lawson, violinist. 10.12 p.m.—A. G. Ellis, baritone: (a) “The Elfin King” (Clutsam). (b) “To the 'Western Wind” (Clutsam), 10.20 p.m. —The Sydney Instrumental Trio: (a) “Lento” (Arensky). (b) “Finale” (Arensky). 10.30 p.m.—Late weather forecast. 10.31 p.m.—Gladys Evans, soprano: (a) “A Song Remembered” (Coates). (b) “Sing, J jyous Bird” (Phillips). 10.38 p.m.—2FO Dance Band, conducted by Cec. Morrison. 10.57 p.m.—To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” The 2FC Dance Band (Cec. Morrison, con- ductor). 11.45 p.m.—National Anthem. Close down. 2BL, SYDNEY. Broadcaster’s Ltd. Wavp Length, 353 Metres. .FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Musical programme from Studio. 10.40 a.m. —News from the “Daily Telegraph Pictorial.” 10.50 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 11 a.m. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Women’s Session. Talk on “Basket Ball’ by Miss Gwen Varley Broadcasters Women’s Sports Authority. Social Notes —Replies to correspondents. Talk on “Feeding the Family” by Mrs. Jor- dan. 12 noon. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special Ocean Forecast and weather report. 12.3 p.m. —Musical programme from the studio 12.8 p.m. —Information, Mails, Shipping, and port directory.


12.11 p.m.—Boats in call by wireless. 12.13 p.m.—Fruit Market report. p ' m * Vegetable Market report. 12.17 p.m.—London Metal Markets. 12.19 pma.—Dairy Farm and Produce Market report. 12.22 p.m.—Forage Market report. 12.24 p.m.—Fish Market report. 12.26 p.m.—Rabbit Market report. 12.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. J2-W P- m - H.M.V. Gramaphone recital. 1.27 p.m.—Stock Exchange report 1.30 p.m.—G.P.O Clock and chimes. J k chll< ? re “ and special entertainment for children in Hospital. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down . AFTERNOON SESSION. Racing information broadcast immediately after each race by courtesy of the •‘Sun’’ newspapers. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Women’s session. Talk by Mrs. Jordan. 3.15 p.m.—Civi l Service Stores Trip—direction Miss De Courcey Bremer.

  • 3 J? J > :“~ Concert broadcast from the radio.

Exhibition at the Sydney Town Hall. _ o T he British music society’s string quartette. s.6i p.m.—Miss Marjorie Skill, soprano. 3.44 p.m.—Mr. Herbert C. Hinchcliffe, baritone

  • •5l P.m. —Miss Dulcie Blair, violinist.
  • •5B p.m.—The British music Society’s String

Quartette. 4.5 p.m.—Miss Marjorie Skill. 4.12 p.m.—Miss Dulcie Blair. 4.19 p.m.—ftfr. Herbert. C. Hinchcliffe 4.26 p.m.—The British Music Society's String Quartette. 4.30 p.m.—Pianoforte Recital from the Studio 4.50 p.m.—News from the “Sun." 4.55 p.m.—Features of evening’s programme 4.59 p.m.—Racing Resume. 5 p.m.—G.P.O Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. SPECIAL COUNTRY SESSION. €.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Australian Mercantile Land and Finance Co’s Report. Weather report and forecast by courtesy of Govt. Meteorologist. Producers Distributing Society’s Fruit and Vegetable Market report. Stock Exchange report. Grain and fodder report (“Sun”). Dairy Produce Report (“Sun”). N.R.M.A. Talk. 6.45 p.m.—Country News from the “Sun.” 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and Chimes. Gulbransen Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m.—Talk on “Gardening Science” by Mr. Cooper, 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Broadcasters Topical Chorus. 8.3 p.m.—Nell Crane and Jack Mayer, enter- tainers. 3.15 p.m.—From the Radio Exhibition at the town hall: Anne Henderson’s happiness girls in dance numbers. 9.15 p.m.—From the studio. Sporting editor of the “Sun” will talk on the prospects of Saturday’s racing. 9.30 p.m.—Romano’s'Tlestaurant dance orches- tra under the direction of Mr. Merv. Lyons broadcast from Romano’s. 9.40 p.m.—From the Studio: Mrs. L. Kirwen (songs at the piano). 9.47 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 9.57 p.m.—From the Studio: Mr. Bobby Watson, comedian. 10.4 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Orches- tra • 10.14 p.m.—From the Studio: Mrs. L, Kirwen. 10.21 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 10.31 p.m.—From the Studio: Mr. Bobby Watson. lO.ud p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. During intervals between dances Sun news will be broadcast. 11.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. National Anthem. 2 UW, SYDNEY Sandel Radio, Ltd. Wave Length, 267 Metres. • FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 192.8. evening session. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.4 p.m.—Where to Go. 7.10 p.m.—Dinner music. 7.40 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental items. » p.m.—News items. 8.10 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental items. 8.10 p.m.—Gems of the Opera, arranged and presented by Mr. G. F. Manuel. 9.30 p.m.—Dance music. 9.58 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE Broadcasting Co. of Aust. Wave Length. 371 Metres. FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m.—Morning Melodies. 7.20 a.m.—PHYSICAL CULTURE EXER- CISES (to music). 7.27 a.m.—Morning Melodies. 7.33 a.m.—Weather forecast for all States 7.40 a.m.—News. 8 a.m.—Melbourne Observatory time signal. 8.1 a.m.—Morning Melodies 8.5 a.m.—News. Sporting information. Ship- ping. Stock Exchange information. 8.13 a.m.—Morning melodies. 8.15 a.m.—CJose down. MORNING SESSION. II a.m.—3LO’s CULINARY COUNSELS, or how to create creature comforts with a minimum of cash. FURNITURE POLISH. %pint linseed oil. % pint turpentine.

  • 4 pint methylated spirit.

% pint vinegar. Put all ingredients into a bottle, keep well corked, and shake before using. 11.1 a.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN Keep yours bright with fragrant flowers. “There are few joys in the world equal to the fpy of a garden, and a garden sets off a home as an appropriate frame does a picture.” —Gene Stratton Porter. THIS MONTH BE SURE TO PLANT: Pansies, Petunias, Iceland poppies, polyan- thus, primrose, and pyrethrum. 11.10 a.m.—VEGETARIAN COOKING MATRON BARTLETT will give hints on the cooking of vegetable dishes. 11.20 a.m.—Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m.—“AU FAIT:” “Feminine Fancies.” 11.40 a.m.—Musical interludes 11.45 a.m.—Under the auspices of the Health Association, DR. FEATONBY will speak on “Serums and Toxins,” Part 2. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon. —Melbourne Observatory time signal. 12.1 p.m.—Metal prices received by the Aus- trahan Mines and Metals Association from the London Stock Exchange this day. British Official wireless news from Rugby Reuter’s and the Australian Press Associa- tion cables. “Argus” news service 12.20 p.m.—BERTHA JOR'GENSEN’S QUAR- TETTE: “Scenes from the Prophets” (Bath) 12.30 p.m.—J.D. FRASER, baritone: “My Mary Sweet and Brown” (Kilnerl “Molly” (Herbert). 12.37 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 12.40 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN violin • “Cradle Song” (Ter Aulin). Waltz. 12.50 p.m.—MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: “The Carnival of Venice” (Benedict) “The Spinning Wheel” (gcotcisn,. 12-57 p.m.—HILDA BRENInICKE, ’cello: “Sous le douceur despins” (Jongeus(. 1.4 p.m.—Meteorological information. Weather forecast for Victoria, Tasmania, South Aus- tralia and New South Wales. Ocean fore- cast. River reports. FOUNDATIONS OF MUSIC 1.11 p.m.—AGNES FORTUNE will to-day continue her petite concerts with a further selection of the works of Beethoven. 1.21 p.m. J. D. FRASER, (baritone: ‘II Balem” (Verdi). “My Heart’s Desire” (Coningsby-Clarke) 1.28 p.m.—BERTHAH JORGENSEN’S TRIO • “My Wild Irish Rose” (Obrott). “My Rosary for You” (Ball). 1.38 p.m. MOLLY MACKAY, soprano t “Se Saran Rose” (Arditi). “Saper Vorreste” (Verdi). 1.45 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. Results of Public School Cricket. 2.15 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Othello Suite” (Coleridge-Taylor). 2.30 p.m.—ELLA RIDDELL, contralto; “The Auld Scotch Songs” (Leeson). “The Briar Bush” (Maxfield). 2.37 p.m.—TASMA TIERNAN, ’cello: “Nocturne” (Chopin). 2.44 p.m.—FRANCES FRASER: “Travels with the Argonauts.” 3 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection, “Rainbow” (Gershwin). Selected. 3.13 p.m.—AUTUMN GARDEN WEEK: Transmission from Wirth’s Park. W. R. WARNER,; President of Garden Week Committee, will speak on “Novel Garden Features.” 3.25 p.m —FROM THE STUDIO MARION LIGHTFOOT. banjo: “Volga Boatmen.” “Kilties.” “Oddity.” 3.32 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: Prelude in G Minor” (Rachmaninoff). “Dance of the Serpents” (Boccalare). 3.42 p.m.—ELLA RIDDELL, contralto: “Rothsay Bay” (Old Scotch). “Cornin’ Thro’ the Rye” (Burns). 3.49 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA : TRIO for violin, cello and piano. “Nina Pergolse.” “Minuet.” 3.53 p.m.—MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: “Blossoms.” Selected. 3.59 p.m.—Results of Public School Cricket. 4 p.m.—HAROLD MOSCHETTI, tenor sax: Selected. 4.5 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection, “The Quaker Girl.” Waltz, “Spanish Moon.” Selected. 4 ‘^- m ;r MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: The Rose Enslaves the Nightingale” (Rimsky-Korsakov). Request item. 4.34 p.m.— MARION LIGHTFOOT, banjo- Drum Major.” “Patrol Eccentrique.” 4.41 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA : Selected. 4.45 p.m.—Special weather report from Ade- laide. Report from Mildura district. 4.46 p.m.—Joseph Bailie, flute: Selected.


4.50 pm.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Oxford Symphony in G Major” (Hayden). 5 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Stock Ex- change information. 6.15 p.m.—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings by “BILLY BUNNY.” 6.20 p.m.—CAPT. DONALD MacLEAN: “The Spanish Conquests—How the Dons dis- covered the Treasures of the World.” 6.35 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6.40 p.m.—“BILLY BUNNY:” “Stories of the Australian Bush.* THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN. Keep your garden gay with a kaleidoscope of GODETIAS. CURRENT CHRONICLES. Results of Public School Cricket. 7 p.m.—Official report of Newmarket stock sales by the Asociated Stock and Station Agents, Bourke Street, Melbourne. 7.5 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Weather synopsis . Shipping movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 7.17 p.m.—Fish market reports by J. R. Bor- rett Ltd. Rabbit prices. 7.19 p.m.—River reports. 7.21 p.m.—Market reports by the Victorian Producers' Co-operative Co., Ltd. Poultry, Grain, Hay, Straw, Jute, Dairy Produce, Potatoes and Onions. Market reports of fruit by the Victorian Fruiterers’ Associa- tion. Retail prices. Wholesale prices of fruit by the Wholesale Fruit Merchants’ Association. Citrus fruits. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Under the auspices of the DE- PARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, A. J. GILL, Senior Herd Tester, State Depart- ment of Agriculture, will speak on “Factors Affecting Milk Tests.” 7.45 p.m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ BAND: March, “Never Despair.” Quartette, “Old Robin Gray.” 7.52 p.m.—MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: “A Thrush’s Love Song.’ ’ “Music When Soft Voices Die” (Bishop). 8 p.m.—H. K. LOVE: “Technicalities.” Mr. Love will be glad to attend to yout wireless difficulties, and we ask you to write to him for any advice you may require. 8.10 p.m.— COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ BAND: “Loving Smile of Sister Kind” —Faust. 8.17 p.m.—HENRY TROMPE, baritone: “Sapphic Ode” (Brahms). “Like to the Damask Rose” (Elgar). 8.24 p.m.—ERIC AKINS will speak on "To-morrow’s Events at the Motordrome.” 8.34 p.m.—TRANSMISSION FROM BALLAR- AT. COMMUNITY SINGING SOCIETY. President, Cr. W. Elsworth. Conductor, Mr. Bert Humphries. Pianist, Mrs. Simons. Secretary, Mr. Frank Braden. Opening Chorus by the Ballarat Community Singers Short Address by the Chairman, Mayor Cr. A. MacKenzie. CHORUS, “Mother Machree.” “My Bonnie is Over the Ocean.’* “Bye, Bye, Blackbird.” MISS A. HIGGINS, soprano: “Rosebuds” (Ardite). CHORUS, “Ballarat.” “Sailing.” “Nancy Lee.” MR- J- HAYMES, violinf. Selected. CHORUS, “Killarney.” “Soldier’s Farewell.” “Comin* Thro’ the Rye.” MRS. RITCHIE, contralto: "Three Fishers” (Hullah). CHORUS, “Massa’s in the Cold, Cold Ground.” “My Old Kentucky Home.” “Polly Wolly Doodle.” ANDREWS, Mouth Organ Solo: Anme Laurie.” CHORUS. “Oh, For a Thousand Tongues to Sing.” ‘‘Love’s Old Sweet Song.” “Land of Hope and Glory.” RAY PITTS, tenor: ™‘™ enade ” (Schubert). “Till we Meet Again.” Down Hawaii Way.” “Some Folks Do.” “Love is Just a Little Bit of Heaven.” Tipperary.” FROM THE STUDIO. 10 p.m.—“CARDIGAN” (Mr. H. A. Wolfe) will speak on to-morrow’s races. 10.9 p.m.—Results of Triangular State School Cricket Match between Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, played in Sydney. 10.10 p.m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS' BAND: Overture, “The Golden Sceptre.” 10.17 p.m.—GRACE JACKSON, contralto: “In a Monastery Garden” (Ketelby). “Just a Cottage Small.” 10.24 p m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ BAND: "La Paloma.” 10.31 p.m.—HENRY TROMPE, baritone: “Go, Lovely Rose” (Quilter). “My Lady’s Bower” (Temple). 10.38 p.m.—-“Argus” news service. Meteorolo- gical information. Road notes. British official wireless news ftom Rugby. Island shipping news. The Rova 1 Automobile Club of Victoria’s SAFETY MESSAGE for to-day is for MOTORISTS:— “Do not unnecessarily or suddenly squawk your horn. Pedestrians may (be easily frightened and temporarily ‘Paralysed.’ ” 10.50 p.m.—COLLINGWOD CITIZENS’ BAND: Selection, “Dixie Land.” 11 n.m.-THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN. Keen vour garden gay with a Kaleidoscope of Calliopsis, Campanula, Candytuft. Canter- bury Bells. Chrysanthemum, Cornflowers, and Clarkia. OUR GREAT THOUGHT— “And he gave it for his opinion that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.” Swift. 11.1 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: 11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE Associated Radio Co. Wave Length, 484 Metres. .FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. MIDDAY CONCERT SESSION. 12.1 p.m. to 1.54 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House, 252 Col- lins Street, (by exclusive permission of Wills and Paton Ltd.), on the Brunswick Pana- trope. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL DANCE CONCERT. 2 p.m. —Ayarz Dansonians: A half-hour Dance Session by Melbourne s favorite Dance Band. All the latest popular hits, each one announced prior to its pre- sentation.. 2.30 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Suite Dansante, “Intermezzi” (Rosse). Selection, “Puppetts” (Novello). 2.49 p.m. Mr. Ronald Blong, baritone: “O Night of Star sand Splendour” (ThoCn©» son). “Tired Hands” (Sanderson). 2.56 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Selection from, “Carmen” (Tobani). 3.12 p.m.—Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin : “Swing Song” (Barnes.) “Polichinelle” (Kreisler). 3.16 p.m.-—Mr. Ronald Blong. baritone: “If I built a world for you” (Lehmann), “A Sergeant of the Line” (Squire). 5.24 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Extase Melodieuse” (Littau). 3.30 p.m.—lnterval announcements. 3.35 p.m.—lnterval Talk on Cookery in tfcft House. 3.45 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Petite Suite Moderne” (Rosse). 3.52 p.m.—Mr. Alan Adcock, humorous enter* tainer: “And so we go on” (Weston & Lee). 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second Weather forecast. 4.3 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians: 4.19 p.m.—Mr. Ernie Pettifer, saxaphone: “Valse Brilliant” (Pettifer). 4.23 p.m.—Mr. Alan Adcock, humorous entei*» tainer: “Mama’s gone young, Papa’s gone old” (Weston & Lee). 4.30 p.m.—Melbouurne Concert Orchestra: “A lover in Damascus” (Woodforde-Finden). 4.50 p.m.—To-night’s Entertainment. Announcements. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Five.** God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—3Aß’s. Cousin Peter. EVENING SESSION. BALL ROOM AND CONCERT HALL. 7.15 p.m.—Health Session. Mr. George Beat- tie, Principal of the Beattie College of Physical Culture, on “Physical Fitness.” 7.30 p.m.—Sport Session. “Harlequin” pre- sents his buget of news and comments on Sport of the Day. 7.50 p.m.—Macnamara’s Stock Reports. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Overture, “Raymond” (Thomas). 8.10 p.m.—Miss Jean Lewis, contralto: “Lie there my lute” (Maccun). “E’en as a lovely flower” (Arnold). 8.17 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 8.33 p.m.—Mr. Michel Connolly, baritone: “The Birth of Morn” (Leoni). “Thou’rt Passing Hence” (Sullivan). 8.41 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “By the Lake of Geneva, Part 2” (Bendel). 8.50 p.m. —Announcements. 9.2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 9.18 p.m.—Miss Ethel Brearley, piano* “Consolations” (Liszt). 9.22 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Ballet Russe” (Luigini). 9.34 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 9.42 p.m.—Miss Jean Lewis, contralto. “I love you truly” (Jocobs-Bond). “De las’ long res’ ” (Jacobs-Bond). 9.50 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Ten.” 10.1 p.m.—Semi-Final Weather forecast, specially for our Country Listeners. 10.3 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “From Schubert’s Sketch-Book” (Urbach). 10.19 p.m.—Mr. Robert Adams, trumpet: Serenade, “Through the Night” (Schubert), 10.23 p.m.—Mr. Michel Connolly, baritone: “I wonder why” (Clarke). “To a Minature” (Brahe). “A Request” (Woodforde-Finden). 10.31 p.m. —Ayarz Dansonians. 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 10.50 p.m.—“Age” news bulletin, exxclusiv* to 3AR. 10.58 p.m.—Final Weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good Night quota is taken from the poem, “Gig Foiy-s” by McG. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eleven.” God Save the King.


i 4QG, BRISBANE. j Queensland Radio Service. L Wave Length, 385 Metres. .FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. MORNING SESSION. MIDDAY SESSION. 1 P-m.—Market reports, weather information supplied by the Commonwealth Weather Bureau ; news services supplied by “The Daily Mail” and “The Daily Standard.” 1.20 p.m.—Lunch hour music. 1.58 p.m. — Standard time signal. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION, 3.30 p.m.—Mail train running times. 3.31 p.m.—A programme of mus.c from the studio. “The Telegraph News.” 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION.- 6 p.m.—Mail train running times. Daily Stan- dard news, Weather Information announce- ments. 6.10 p.m.—Dinner music. 6.30 p.m.—Bedtime stories by “The Sandman.” 7 p.m.— Market reports; stock reports. 7.30 p.m.- Weather news; “Daily Standard” news; announcements. 7.43 p.m.—Standard time signals. 7.45 p.m.—To-morrow’s racing news. NIGHT SESSION. “Ric Ferber on Trial” is the first of a series of short radio dramas by Mies Thelma Champion. CAST. Simpson (in the service of Justice Begley) Mr. H. Humphreys Jean Ferber (Ric’s mother) Miss T. Champion Edward Smythe (proprietor of the hotel where the murder was committed) Mr. Tom Muuller T. Mitchley (barrister) ... Mr. Tom Muuller Robert Dunn (a detective) . . Mr. Ray Bruce J. Philpot (Crown Prosecutor) Mr. Ray Bruce Ric Ferber (on trial for the murder of Blue Edmonds) Mr. J. P. Cornwell Gwendolyn Begley (finance of Ric Ferber) Mrs. Robt Bell Mr. Justice Begley (a Judge of the Supreme Court) Mr. H. Gilroy SYNOPSIS: Scene 1: Mr. Justice Begley’s Home. Scene 2: The Same Place three hours later. 8 p.m.—FROM THE STUDIO: A Radio Drama : “Ric Ferber on Trial.” _ POPULAR STUDIO PROGRAMME. 8.45 p.m.—Week-end road information for motorists officially supplied by the Royal Automobile Club of Queensland. 9 p.m.—A programme of popular music by the “Studio Orpheans” (conductor, Mr. Tom Muller), accompanied by the Studio Orches- tra (conductor, Mr. A. R. Featherstone). Supporting Artists:—The Clarwin Duo. 10 p.m.—FROM THE STUDIO: “Daily Mail” news. Weather news. Close down. SCL, ADELAIDE. Central Broadcasters, Ltd. Wave Length, 395 Metres. .FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Chimes. 12.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service and Bri- tish Wireless News. 12.30 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio Recreator.” 12.50 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change intelligence. 12.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 1 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes.

  • •1 P m - —Musical numbers on the Studio

Recreator.” 1.67 p.m.—Meteorological information. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 3.1 p.m.—Musicai numpbers on the Studio Recreator.” 3.30 p.m.—Menu talk by "Homelover.” 3.45 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio Recreator.” 4.57 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Children’s Entertainment—Amscols Special half-hour. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner Music on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 6.55 p.m.—General Market reports by A W Sandford and Co., A. E. Hall and Co., Dal- gety and Co., S.A. Farmers Co-operative Union, Taylor Bros., Retail Grocers Asso- ciation. Interstate Fruit and Produce Mar- ket Ltd. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 7.8 p.m. Windbag’s” Sporting Service, 7.15 p.m.—Selection Studio Orchestra. 7.25 p.m.—Soprano solos, Marcella Berardi. 7.30 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 7.35 p.m.—Duet, Marcella Berardi and Vincent McMurray. 7.40 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 7.45 p.m.—Tenor solo, Vincent McMurray. <•5O p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 7.55 p.m.—Soprano solos, Marcella Berardi. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Relayed from Malcolm Reid and Co.’s warehouse, selections by Malcolm Reid and Co.’s Orchestra. 8.10 p.m.—Tenor solo, Vincent McMurray. 8.15 p.m.—Selections, Malcolm Reid and Co.’s Orchestra. 8.25 p.m.—Quartette, Apollo Male Quartette. 8.30 p.m.—Selections, Malcolm Reid’s Or- chestra • 8.40 p.m.—Quartette. Apollo Male Quartette. 8.46 p.m.—Selections, Malcolm Reid’s Orches- tra. 8.50 p.m.—Contralto solo, Edith Harvey. 8.55 p.m.—Finale Malcolm Reid’s Orchestra. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 9.1 p.m.—Meteorological information. 9.2 p.m.—Dalgety’s wheat report. 9.5 p.m.—Comedy, Don Fraser. 9.10 p.m.—Overture, Studio Orchestra. 9.20 p.m.—Contralto solo. Edith Harry. 9.25 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 9.30 p.m.—Talk by Mr. W. J. Spafford (Chief Agricultural Instructor). 9.45 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 9.50 p.m.—Comedy, Don Fraser. 9.55 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—British Wireless News. 10.5 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service. 10.10 p.m.—“Windbag’s” Sporting Service. 10.18 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 10.25 p.m.—Comedy, Don Fraser. 10.30 p.m.—Relayed from the Maison de Danse Glenelg—Dance Music. 10.55 p.m.—Saturday’s programme and meteo- rological information. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH Westralian Farmer’s. Wave Length, 1250 Metres. .FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928 MORNING SESSION. 12.30 p m.—Tune in. 12.26 p.m.—Markets, News, and Cables. 1 signal. U v P ; m '^ notes supplied by the Meteorological Bureau of Western Australia. I ' i P-m- —Studio Quintette. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Tune in. 3.35 p.m.—Orchestral music played by Hoyts Orchestra, conducted by Mr. Harold Parting- ton relayed from Hoyt’s Regent Theatre, William street. Vocal interludes from the Studio. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. lAENING SESSION. 645 pm 7une in. The e\eririg tiansmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 6.50 p.m.—Stories for the Kiddies by Uncles Henry, Bertie and Duffy. 7.20 p.m.—Stocks, Makrets, News. 7.45 p.m.—Racing talk by the Sporting editor of “Truth” Newspaper Co. 8 p.m.—Time signal. 8.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. Station announcements scuh as alterations to programmes, etc. 8.3 p.m.—Popular hour. Musical programmes from the Studio, in- cluding vocal and instrumental artists. ’ 9 pm..—A relay. Vocal and instrumental concert relayed from Messrs. Morris Bros., Music Warehouse, Hay street. 9.35 p.m.—Health talk by Mr. H. S. Hatton, principal of Hatton’s Physical Culture School. 10 p.m.—Late news items by courtesy of “The Daily News” Newspaper Co. Ships within range announcement; Weather report and forecast. 10.30 p.m.—Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5 metres of programme given on 1250 r\etres, commen, cing at 6.45 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART Tasmanian Broadcasters, Ltd. ! Wave Length, 516 Metres. FRIDAY, 30th MARCH, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.—Musical selection. 3.5 p.m.—Hobart Stock Exchange Quotations. Weather information. Items of interest. 3.15 p.m.—Selections by 7ZL Studio Trio; March, “The National Game” (German). “A Hungarian Episode” (Bendix). , Romance and two dances from the con- querer. (German). Violin solo. Selected. Mr. E. J. McCann. “Si K’ai Ton Ceour” (Berniaus). “Sweet Dreams of Home” (Engleman). “Princess Gavotte” (German). Pianoforte Solo. Selected. Mr. A. Roberts. 4.15 p.m.—Educational talk. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Children’s Corner with the Radio Lady. 7 p.m.—Young Folks gardening chat by Mr. George Nation. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Fruit Poultry and Produce reports through the courtesy of Roberts and Co., Ltd. 7.35 p.m.—Gardening talk by Mr. George Nation of Glen Nurseries, Cascades. 7.50 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Railway auction produce sales Weather forecasts. Hobart Stock Exchange quotations.


8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 8.1 p.m.—Broadcast by Direct wire Weekly Lecture at Lyceum Club, Hobart. Concert from the Studio: Miss Norah Freney, soprano. Mr. G. Hook, comedian. Mr. Victor Pharoah, banjoist. Mr. Harry Bates, tenor. Miss Ruby Piesse, accompanist. Mr. E. Brooker, accordian. 9.30 p m.—Crick a t Chat bv Mr. A. O’Leary. 9.40 p.m.—British Official Wirless news. 9.50 p.m.—Mercury special Infers aie news ser- vice. Ships within wireless ran~e. Tas- manian District weather rap i ts. 9 r> m. weather forecasts. Weather renorts from Australian Capital cities. Travellers week- end information. Station announcements, Saturday’s programme. 10 p.m.—Close down. Saturday, March 31 2FC, SYDNEY. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10 a.m.—“Big Ben”'and announcements. 10.5 a.m. —Studio music. 10.15 a.m. —’’Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 10.30 a.m.—Studio music. 10.35 a.m. —A talk by the 2FC Racing Com- missioner. 10.45 a.m.—Studio music. 11 a.m. —“Big Ben.” A.P.A. and Reuter’s Cable Services. 11.5 a.m. —A talk on Gardening by “Redgum” J. G. Lockley. 11.38 a.m. —Close down. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon. —“Big Ben” and announcements. 12.2 p.m.—Stock Exchange. 12.3 p.m.—Studio music. 12.20 p.m.—“Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 12.25 p.m.—Rugby wireless news. 12.30 p.m.—Studio music. Ip m. —“Big Ben.” W’eather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news ser- vice. NOTE: During the afternoon race results from Warwick Farm will be described by the 2FC’s Racing Commissioner. Between 3.30 p.m. and 4.30 p.m. the follow- ing musical items will be given from the platform of the Sydney Town Hall, on the occasion of the Radio Electrical Exhibition: 8.30 p.m.—2FC Dance Trio, conducted by Cyril Coy: (a) “Lucky Day” (Henderson). (b) “Charmame” (Pollack). 8.40 p.m.—Heather Harding, soprano: “One Fine Day” (Puccini). 3.44 p.m.—Douglas McKinnon, concertina: (a) “Le Chevalier Breton” (Herman). (b) March, “Dominion of Canada” (May Hill). 8.52 p.m.—Cyril Coy’s Dance Trio: (a) “Just say good-night” (Nelson). (b) “Take your finger out of your mouth.” 4 p.m.—Lionel Lunt, English baritone, late of the “Carl Rosa” Opera Company of England: (a) "Prologue” (Leoncavallo). (b) “Tommy Lad” (Margetson). 4.8 p.m. —From the Sydney Town Hall: Cyril Coy’s Dance Trio: (a) “As long as I have you” (Lewis Simon). (b) “Red lips kiss my blues away.” 4.16 p.m.—Lionel Lunt, English baritone: “Harlequin” (Sanderson). 4.21 p.m. —Heather Harding, soprano: “Waltz Song,” from “Tom Jones” (Ger- man). 4.25 p.m. —Cyril Coy’s Dance Trio: “Me and My Shadow.” Accompanist, Enid Conley. 4-30 p.m. Further race results and studio music. 4- p Complete sporting resume, includ- ing the result of the Cricket Match, played in New Zealand to-day: Australia versus New Zealand. 6 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The chimes of 2FC. 5- p.m. Ihe ’ Heiio Man” ta.ks to the chil- dren. 6.15 p.m. Story time for the young folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music, i p.m. Big Ben.” Late sporting news.

  • ■ /a pm - Weather intelligence.

<.lB p.m.—“Evening News” late news service. p.in.—Studio music. night session. <■4o p.m. Programme announcements. 7-45 p.m.—Studio music. 7 '^ A P ;™r A ta;k b y Dr - T. J. Henry: A lri P <-o Tia, Juana, Mexico.” rp P ' m \7 From the platform of the Sydney „“' vn Hall > the concluding programme by r't artists on the final night of the Radio Electrical Exhibition. A Russian Orchestra in native costumes. A combination of 14 players playing the Rus- sian instrument, “The Ballalaika”: (a) “Longing for Homeland,” March (Dobr» kotoff). (b) “All is quiet in the fields” (Aureef). (c) “Outoushva” (Aureef). 8.20 p.m.—Elsie Peerless, soprano: (a) The bird that came in Spring” (Bene- dict). (b) “Lovely Spring” (Cowen). 6.28 p.m.—Harrison White’s Banjo Band: (a) ‘ Romping Rosie” (Rossiter). (b) “Selection of Scotch Airs” (arr. White). (c) “Look in the Mirror” (Stept). 8.38 p.m.—Alex. Whitson, baritone: (a) “Beware of the Maidens” (Day). (b) “A Song of the Ren” (Charles). 6.45 p.m.—The Russian “Ballalakia” Orches- tra : (a) “On the River Volga” (Ivanoff). (b) “So went our little (Andreeff) 8.55 p.m.—Elsie Peerless, soprano, and Alex. Whitson, baritone: Duet, “The Magic of Your Voice.” 0.4 p.m.^ —The Russian “Balialaika” Orches- tra : (a) "Folksong” (Andreeff). (b) “Polianka” (Privaloff). At the piano: Horace Keats. 0.10 p.m. —From the Studio: Late weather forecast. 9.11 p.m.—First appearance with this station of the distinguished pianist, Henri Penn: (a) “Scherzo No. 2 (Chopin). (b) “Liebestraume” (Liszt). 9.28 p.m.—Elsie Peerless, soprano: “Passion-Flower” (Coates). 9.32 p.m.—The Russian Ballalaika Orchestra: (a) “Dreamy Garden,” Waltz (Andreeff). (b) “Katenka” (Andreeff). (c) Folksong (variations) (Privaloff). 9.42 p.m.—Ernest Archer, tenor: “Friend.” 9.45 p.m. —The Russian “Ballalaika’ Orches- tra : (a) “In Moscow” (Fantasy) (Ivanoff). (b) “Moldavian Song” (arr. Snurnoff). 9.55 p.m. —Elsie Peerless, soprano: “The String of Pearls” (Phillips). 10 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Henri Penn, pianoforte solos: (a) “Chanson” (Friml). (b) “Ballade No. 1” (Chopin). (c) “Toccata” (Debussy). 10.12 p.m. —Ernest Archer, tenor: “A Rose and You” (Stoneham). 10.16 p.m. —Harrison White’s Banjo Band: (a) “A Night in June” (Friend). (b) “Yesterday,” Waltz (Brown). (c) “Moonlit Waters.” 10.26 p.m. —Late weather forecast. 10.27 p.m. —From the Ambassadors : The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra, con- ducted by A 1 Hammet. 10.37 p.m.—Studio items. 10.40 p.m.—The Ambassadors Dance Orches- tra. 10.57 p.m.—From the Studio: To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra. 11.45 p.m.—National Anthem. • 2BL, SYDNEY. SATURDAY, 31st MARCH. 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Social Notes—Replies to correspondents. Talk on “Simple Cooking for Children’* by Mrs. Jordan. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special Ocean forecast, and weather report. 12.3 p.m.—Musical programme from the studio 12.20 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 12.25 p.m.—Sporting and athletic fixtures. 12.27 p.m.—What’s on at the Pictures and Theatres. 12.30 p.m.—Musical programme from the studi* 12.40 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 12.50 p.m;—Musical programme from the studio. gi 1 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Musical programme from the studio. 2.30 p.m.—Miss Ada Althouse, soprano. 2.37 p.m.—Musical programme from the studio 3 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Orchestra under the direction of Mr. Merv. Lyons. 3.10 p.m.—Miss Grace Quine, descriptive artist, 3.17 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Orches- tra. 3.27 p.m.—Mr. Cecil Chaseling, baritone. 3.34 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 3.44 p.m.—Mr. Stan Cartnell, comedian. 3.51 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 4 p.m.—Miss Ada Althouse. 4.7 p.m.—Mr. Stan Cartnell. 4.14 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 4.2-1 P,m. —Miss Grace Quine. 4.34 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. 4.41 p.m.—Mr. Cecil Chaseling. 4.45 p.m.—Complete resume of all race meet- ings. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. 6.30 p.m.—Resume of races. Result of sporting. News from the “Sun.” 7 —p.m. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m.—Talk on “Aborigines” by “Bringa.** 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Broadcasters Topical Chorus. 8.3 p.m.—The Hawaiian Harmony Girls. 8.10 p.m.—Miss Dulcie Starkey, soprano. 8.17 p.m.—Mr. Phill Mountain, comedian. 8.24 p.m.—Broadcasters Instrumental Trio. 8.31 p.m. —Mr. E. H. Watson, baritone. 8.38 p.m.—Miss Kathleen Logue, violinist. 8.45 p.m.—Broadcast from the Studium : A description of the boxing contest by Mr. Basil Kirke. 9.30 p.m.—From the Studio : The Hawaiian Harmony Girls. 9.37 p.m.—Miss Dulcie Starkey. 9.44 p.m. —Mr. Phil Mountain. 9.51 p.m.—Broadcasters Instrumental Trio. 9.58 p.m.—Mr. E. H. Watson. 10.5 p.m.—Miss Kathleen Logue. 10.12 p.m. —Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. 10.15' p.m. —The Wentworth Cafe Orchestra under the direction of Mr. S. Simpson. During intervals between dances “Sun” new* will be broadcast.


2UW, SYDNEY SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 1928. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.10 p.m.—Where to Go Session. 7.15 p.m.—Dinner music. 7.40 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental items. 8 p.m.—News items. 8.15 p.m.—Dance music by courtesy of Morley, Johnson, Ltd. 9 p.m.—Sporting results. 9.15 p.m.—Continuation of dance programmes. 9.55 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m.—Tonic Tones. 7.20 a.m.—PHYSICAL CULTURE EXER- CISES (to the tonic tones). 7.33 a.m.—Weather forecasts for all States. Mails. 7.40 a.m.—News. 8 a.m. —Melbourne Observatory tjme signal. 8.1 a.m.—Tonic Tones. 8.5 a.m.—NEWS. Sporting information. Shipping. Stock Exchange fluctuations 6.13 a.m.—Tonic Tones. 8.15 a.m.—Close down. MORNING SESSION. 11 am—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Heart of Her” (Cadman). “At Dawning" (Cadman). “Indian Summer Suite’' (Lake). 11.15 a.m.—BOBBY PEARCE, baritone: “The King’s Minstrel” (Pinsuti). “The Little Irish Girl” (Lohr). 11.22 a.m. -STATION ORCHESTRA: “A Lover in Damascus” (Finden). 11.34 a.m.—MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: "Mu3otta’s Song.” “Wind Sonfi” (James Rogers). 11.41 a.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Kamennoi Ostrow” (Rubinstein). MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—Melbourne Observatory time signal. 12.1 p.m.—Metal prices received by The Aus- tralian Mines and Metals Association from the London Stock Exchange this day. British Official Wireless news from Rugby. Reuter’s and The Australian Press Associa- tion cables. "Argus” news service. “HENCE LOATHED MELANCHOLY.** 12.20 a.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Three Arabian Dances” (Ring). 12.28 p.m.—WILL PAGE, Xylophone* “Spnrks.” 12.32 p.m.—MOLLY MACKAY, soprano: “Depuis le jour” (Charpentier). “Request number.” 12.39 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 12.40 p.m.—ROGER SMITH. Trombone solo: “Berceuse de Jocelyn” I Godard). With orchestral accompaniment. 12.47 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “In a Clock Store.” “Selected.” 1 p.m.—Melbourne Observatory time signal. THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN. Keep your garden gay with a kaleidoscope of Ageratum, Alyssum, Chrysanthemum, Antirrhinum and Delphinium. 1.1 GRACE JACKSON, contralto: “When the Dream is There” (D’Hardelot). ”1 Love You Truly.” 1.7 p.m.—Meteorological information. Weather report of Victoria, Tasmania, New South Wales and South Australia. Ocean reports. River reports. 1.17 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA : “Songs from ’Eliland’ ” (F. von Fieltz). 1.24 p.m.—BOBBY PEARCE, baritone: “Your eyes have told me so” (Hardy). “I Wonder if ever the Rose” (Slater). 131 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Romanza Sanza Parole” (Sera). “The Mill Stream” (G. Smith). 1.38 p.m.—GRACE JACKSON, contralto: “I’ll Sing to You” (Thompson). “A Bowl of Roses” (Coningsby Clarke). 1.45 p.m.—Close down. 2 p.m.—Description of Trial Hurdle, fwo miles, EPSOM RACES, by "Musket,” of “The Sporting Globe.” Results of Public School Cricket. 2.5 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRICKET—Semi-finals. Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.15 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: “Selections from Grand Opera.” 2.30 p.m. - Description of Two-Year-Old Handicap 4 furlongs, 200 yards, EPSOM RACES, by “Musket,” of “The Sporting Globe.” 2.35 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRICKET— Semi-finals. 2.50 p.m.— JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: “Selections from Comic Opera.” 3 p.m.—Description orf Brush Steeple, two miles, EPSOM by “Musket,” of "The Sporting Globe.” 3.5 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: “Selections from English Opera.” 3.15 p.m.—Descriptio nof PENNANT CRIC- KET—Semi-finals. 3.30 p.m.—Description of Epsom Handicap, l 3 i miles. EPSOM RACES, by “Musket," of “The Sporting Globe.” 3.35 p.m —JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Fox-trots.” 3.50 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRICKET—Semi-finals. 4 p.m.—Description of Epsom Plate, six furlongs, EPSOM RACES, by "Musket.” ot “The Sporting Globe.” Results of Public School Cricket. 4.5 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Waltzes.” 4.15 p.m. Description of PENNANT CRICKET—Semi-finals. 4.30 p.m. - Description of Epsom Purse, one mile. EPSOM RACES, by “MuskeL” of “The Sporting Globe.” 4.35 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, "Marches.” 4.45 p.m.—Weather reports of Adelaide. Weather reports from Mildura district. 4.46 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIo BOYS: Selection, “Fox-trot.” 4.55 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Stock Exchange information. 5.15 p.m.—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 6.50 p.m.—Stumps Cricket and Sporting results. 6 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings by “LITTLE MISS KOOKA- BURRA” : 6.20 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6.25 p.m.—“LITTLE MISS KOOKABURRA”: “Baby Ducks Adventure.” 6.34 p.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN. Keep yours gay with kaleidoscope of Mig- nonette, Mimulus and Myosotis. 6.35 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6.40 p.m.—“LITTLE MISS KOOKABURRA”: Another Episode from “Penrod.” CURRENT CHRONICLES. 7 p.m.—Stumps scores. Sporting results. Results of Public School Cricket. 7.5 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Weather synopsis. Shipping movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 7.17 p.m.—River - reports. 7.20 p.m.—Market reports by the Victorian Producers’ Co-operati/e Co.. Ltd. Poultry, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy produce, potatoes, and onions. 'Market reports of fruit by the Victorian Fruiterers Associa- tion. Retail prices. Wholesale prices of fruit by the Wholesale Fruit Merchants Association. Citrus fruit. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—FREDERICK CHAPMAN, A.L.S., F.G.S., National Palaeontologist, of the National Museum, will speak on; "Ferns and Fernlands of the Past.” 7-45 p.m.—Dr. J. A. LEACH will speak on "Black Cockatoos.” 8 p.m.—STUDIO PRESENTATION OF THE SONG CYCLE, “IN A PERSIAN GAR- DEN,” by Liza Lehman. Cast: Soprano ELLA KINGSTON Contralto GERTRUDE HUTTON Tenor VAL. WOFF Bass ERNEST SAGE Musical items: Quartet. ‘ Wake, for the sun who scatter'd into ilight.” Tenor: ' Before the phantom of false morn- ing died.” Bass: “Now the New Year reviving old desires.” Tenor: “Iram indeed is gone with all his rose.” Quartette: “Come, fill the cup, and in the fire of Spring.” Bass: "Whether all Naishapur or Babylon.” Contralto: “Ah, not a drop that from our cups we throw.” Soprano and Tenor: “A book of verses underneath the bough.” Bass: “Myself when young did eagerly frequent.” Contralto: “When you and I behind the veil are past.” Soprano: “But if the soul can fling the dust aside.” Tenor: Alas, that Spring should vanish with the rose.” Contralto: “The world’s hope men set their hearts upon.” Soprano: “Each morn a thousand roses brings you say.” Quartette: “They say the lion and the lizard keep.” Tenor: “Ah, fill the cup, what boots it to repent.” Bass: “As then the tulips for her morning sup.” Quartette: “Alas ! that Spring should vanish with the rose.” 9 p.m.—Description of events at the Motor- drome by “Olypmus.” 9.10 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: Suite, “Cobweb Castle” (Lehman). “Largo” from “New World Symphony” (Dvorak). 9.30 p.m.—Description of to-night’s Stadium event by PERCY TAYLOR. At the conclu- sion of the match, Mr. TAYLOR will give a resume. 10 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Humpty Dumpty Funeral March” (Brandeis). 10.5 p.m.—ERNEST SAGE, baritone: “Could I but find a Garden” (Nellie Simp- son). “Bianca” (Tito Mattei). 10.12 p.m.—BRASS QUARTETTE: “Perfect Day” (Carrie Bond). “Love’s Old Sweet Song” (Taylor).


10.19 p.m.—GRACE JACKSON, contralto. “Good Morning Brother Sunshine” (Lehman). “I’ll Sing to You” (Thompson), 10.26 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA. Reverie, “Ecstasy” (Ganne). 10.33 p.m.—ERNEST SAGE, baritone: P’Maxwellton Braes are Bonnie” (Lady John Scott). “The De’ils awa wi’ th’ Exciseman” (Lady John Scott). 10.40 p.m.—Late Sporting News. 10.50 p.m.—GRACE JACKSON, contralto: “Little Miss Melody” (Monckton). “Punchinello” (Molloy). 10.57 p.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN. Keep yours gay with a kaleidoscope of Gaillardla, Geum, Godetia and Gypsophylla. 10.58 p.m.—THOE VAGABONDS: 11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE SATURDAY, 31st MARCH. 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. MIDDAY CONCERT SESSION. 12.1 p.m.— to 1.54 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House, 252 Collins Street, (by exxclusive permission of Wills and Paton Ltd.), on the Brunswick. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL DANCE CONCERT. Sports results. During the afternoon the results of the Epsom Races will be broad- cast immediately each race is run, together with other information. 2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. A half-hour Dance Session by Melbourne’s fovorite Dance Band. The latest popular hits, eaeh one announced prior to its presen- tation. 2.30 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : Suite, “Rustic Revels” (Fletcher). “Intermezzo and Barcarole” from Les Contes d’Hoffman (Offenbach). 2.45 p.m.'—Miss Vera Thomson, soprano: “Blue Danube” (Strauss). “Cuckoo” (Martin Shaw). 2.53 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : Selection, “Sunny” (Kern). “Serenata Lamentosa” (Humphries). “My Tango Girl” (Rupp). 3.9 p.m.—Miss Vera Thomson, soprano: “Robins Song” (Howard White). “Xh e Lotus Flower” (Schumann). 3.17 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Gounod Fantasie” (Urbach). 8.30 p.m.—lnterval announcements. 3.40 p.m.—Mr. Ronald Brearley, cello. “La Cinquantaine” (Gabriel-Marie). 8.44 p.m. Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Don Quixote” (Safranek). “Barcarolle” (Tschaikowsky). 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second Weather forecast. 4.3 p..m.—Mr. James Scott, bass baritone: “On, away, awake beloved” (Cowan). “When I was a bachelor’’ (Gregory). 4.11 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Canzonetta” (Tschaikowsky). “Danse Lente” (Franck). “Romanze” (Sibelius). 4.26 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute: “Chant du Vent” Unaccompanied (Donjou). 4.30 p.m.—Mr. James Scott, bass baritone: “The Jolly Sailor” (Squire). “The Rani’s Messenger” (Easthope Martin). 4.38 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Melodious Memories” (Finck). 4.55 p.m.—To-night’s Entertainment. An- nouncements. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Five.” God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Mac’s Entertainment. <•3O p.m—Sport Session. “Harlequin” presents his budget of up-to-date news and comments on sport of the day. 7.45 p.m.—Everyman’s Garden. Special week- end talks iby Mr. W. R. Warner, President of the Nurserymen’s and Seedsmen’s Associa- tion of Victoria. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 8.16 p.m.—Mr. Tom Semple, tenor: “From the land of the Sky Blue Water” (Cadman). “Lolita” (Buzza-Peccia). 8.24 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians: Waltz. “Are you lonesome to-night.” (Handman). 8.40 p.m.—The Sundowners Male Quartette: “Serenade” (White). “Mandy” (Cook). 8.48 p.m.—Announcements. 9 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 9.16 p.m.—Mr. Herbert Sanderson, baritone: “The Prologue” (Leoncavallo). “Rip Van Winkle” (Carroll). 9.24 p.m.—Mr. Ernie Pettifer, saxophone: "Valse Erica” (Wiedoeft). 9.28 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians: 9.40 p.m.—The Sundowners Male Quartette: “Love is just a little bit of Heaven” (Baer). “The whisper Song” (Friend). 9.48 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Ten.” 10.1 p.m..—Semi-Final weather forecast, specially for our Country Listeners. 10.3 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 10.19 p.m.—Mr. Robert Allen, alto: “Juanita” (Norton). “The Arrow and the Song” (Balfe). 10.26 p.m.—Mr. Tom Semple, tenor and Mr. Herbert Sanderson, baritone: Duet, “Flow gently Deva” (Parry). 10.30 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians: Waltz, “Nenada” (Nicholls). Fox trot, “Are you happy?” (Ager). 10.36 p.m.—Mr. Robert Gillard. bass: “Song of Hybrias the Certan” (Elliott). "Requiem” (Homer*. 10.42 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonions : Fox trot, “My Blue Heaven” (Donaldson). 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 10.50 p.m.—To-morrow’s Entertainment. An- nouncements. 10.58 p.m.—Final Weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good Night quote is taken from the poem “By the Sea” by George Essex Evans. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eleven.” God Save the King. 4QG, BRISBANE. SATURDAY, 31st MARCH. 1928. NO MORNING SESSION. NO MIDDAY TRANSMISSION. AFTERNOON SESSION. B.A.T.C. RACES. The brisbane Amateur Turf Club’s meeting will be described direct from the Albion Park Racecourse. The commence of trans- mission will depend upon the starting time of the first race and will, as usual, be an- nounced from the studio at 7.45 p.m. on the evening proceding the meeting. FROM ALBION PARK: Brisbane Amateur Turf Club’s Meeting. 5 p m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. g p m> —Special Bi-weekly News Bulletin for distant listeners. 6.30 p.m. —Bedtime stories by “Uncle Ben.” 7.15 p.m. —Racing results. 7.20 p.m. —To-day’s sporting news described. 7.30 p.m. —Sailing notes by Mr. Fred Smith. NIGHT SESSION. 8 p.m.—FROM THE GAIETY THEATRE, TOOWONG: Orchestral music. 8.45 p.m.—FROM THE SPEEDWAY: Motor cycle races. 9.30 p.m.—FORM LENNON’S BALLROOM* Dance music. 10 p.m.—FROM THE STUDIO: “Sunday Mail” news. Weather news. Close down. SCL, ADELAIDE SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 11.1 a.m. —“Advertiser” news service and Bri» tish Wireless News. 11.30 a.m.—Musical numbers on the studio “Recreator.” 12 noon.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. I p.m.—Relayed from Victoria Park Race- course, a running description of the events of the Adelaide Racing Club’s Summer Meet- ing, interspersed with interstate results and musical numbers from the studio. 5 p.m. (Approx.).—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 5.50 p.m.—Resume of the afternoon’s sporting results. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Children’s entertainment by the SCL Radio Family. 6.40 p.m.—Dinner Music on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 7.8 p.m.—Stock Exchange Intelligence by S. C. Ward and Co. 7.15 p.m.—Talk on “Mission Heroes.” 7.30 p.m.—“Books and Bookmen” by C. G. Riley. 7.45 p.m.—Summary of interstate and local sporting results. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—lnstrumental concert relayed from Henley Beaoh Rotunda? Holden’s Silver Band in selections, interspersed with num- bers from the Studio by :—'The Harmony Trio, Ellen Elford, mezzo, and Norman Shepherd, baritone. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 9.1 p.m.—Relay band concert continued. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—lnterstate and local sporting result* 10.10 p.m.—Relayed from the Maison de Danse, Glenelg—Dance Music. 10.55 p.m.—Sunday’s programme. II p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH. SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 12 noon. —Tune in. 12.5 p.m. —Musical programme, including pianoforte selections by Miss Evelyn Willis, A.R.C.M. 12.47 p.m.—Markets, News, and Cables. 1 p.m.—Time signal. 1.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. 1.2 p.m. —Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.15 p.m.—Tune in. 3.20 p.m.—Sporting session. Racing results and Progressive Cricket scores Vocal and instrumental numbers from the studio. 5.30 p.m. —Close down. 6.45 p.m.—Tune in.


EVENING SESSION. The evening transmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 6.50 p.m.—Birthday greetings for the Kiddies by Uncles Henry, Bertie and Duffy. 7.10 p.m.—Sport results. 7.20 p.m.—Markets, News, and Cables. 7.45 p.m.—Talk. 8 p.m.—Time signal. 8.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. Station announcements such as alterations to programmes, etc. 8.3 p.m.—Music and Song. Musical programme from the Studio, in- cluding vocal and instrumental artists. Old time dance music relayed from the Unity Thearte, Beaufort street. 10 p.m.—Late news items by courtesy of “The Daily News” Newspaper Co. Ships within Range announcement; Weather report and forecast. Sports results. 10.30 p.m.—Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultanous broadcast on 104.5 metres of Programme given on 1250 metres, commen- cing at 6.45 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART SATURDAY, 31st MARCH, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. Broadcast by direct wire from T.C.A. Ground description by Mr. A. O’Leary of the Cricket Match, New Town v. Sandy Bay. Progress racing and sporting events, musical items from the Studio. 6 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Hector’s corner. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Musical selections. 7.50 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Sporting results. Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 8.15 p.m.—Danoe numbers by the Pavilion Dance Band from the City Hall, Hobart, in- terspersed with items from the studio. 10.20 p.m.—British Official Wireless news. Ships within wireless range. Weather information. Station announcements. Sunday's programme. Close down. Sunday, April 1 2FC, SYDNEY. MORNING SESSION. 10.45 a.m. —Programme Announcements. 10.50 a.m.—From the First Church of Christ, Scientist, Sydney: THE MORNING SERVICE. Organ Prelude, “Allegro Moderato Serioso” (Mendelssohn), from First Sonata. Hymn 153. Scripture Reading. Silent prayer, followed by audible repeti- tion of the Lord’s Prayer. Hymn 178. Notices. Reading. Solo, “My Son, attend unto my words,” from “The Prodigal Son” (Gounod). Reading. Collection, Organ, “Priere” (Boellmann) Hymn 95. Reading. Benediction. Postlude, Organ, “Allegro Pomposo” (West) 12.15 p.m. From the Studio: Musical Items and News Session. 12.30 p.m.—Close Down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.55 p.m.—Programme Announcements. 3.0 p.m.—From the Petersham Congregational Church: Passion Music from Handel’s “Mes- siah,” rendered by the choir, assisted by the following soloists:— Eleanor Stanton, Contralto. Molyneax Phillips, Tenor. And Soprano. Organist, Ambrose F. Gibbs. 4.30 p.m.—From the Studio: Musical Items. 4.45 p.m.—Close Down. EVENING SESSION. 6.0 p.m.—“Big Ben” and Announcements. 6.5 p.m.—Captain Fred Aarons will continue his series of talks on the “Humours of History.” 6.20 p.m.—From the Fullerton Memorial (Presbyterian) Church): An Organ Recital by Mr. Tinkler. 7.15 p.m.—The Evening Service from the Ful- lerton Memorial Church. 8.15 p.m.—From St. Francis’ Church, Albion Street: A Programme by St. Francis’ (Albion St.) Choir. Conductor, Rev. S. Ellis Herlihy. Organ Overture. "Cujus animam” (Rossini). Miss Marie Toohey. 8.20 p.m.—(a) “Gloria, laus et honor” (Gries- bacher), St. Francis’ Choir. (b) "Sitio” (Trevaglie). (c) “O vos Omnes” (Terrabuggio). Juvenile Choir. 8.25 p.m.—Pianoforte Solo: “Nocturne,” Op. 3, No. 2 (Karganoff). Miss Kathleen Fitzgerald. 8.30 p.m.—(a) “Jesu, Salvator Mundi” (Mene- gali), St. Francis Choir. (b) “Crucem Sanctam” rMascheroni). (c) “Pie Pelicane” (Haller). Male Choir. 8.35 p.m.—Vocal Solo: “Les Rameaux” (Faure), Oliver King. 8.39 p.m.—“Sleep thy last sleep” (in honour of the dead Anzacs). St. Francis’ Choir. 8.43 p.m.—From the Studio: Musical Items during the interval at St. Francis’ Church. 8.53 p.m.—From St. Francis’ Church: Organ Overture, “Postlude” (Challinor), Miss Marie Toohey. 8.58 p.m.—(a) “Turbarum Voces” (The Choral portions of the Passion of Our Lord, ac- cording to St. John XVIII. XIX. 1-24), by Gughielmo Byrd (1607). (b) “Consummatum est” (Dubois), St. Francis’ Choir. 9.22 p.m.—Vocal Solo, “Though Faithlesa Men” (Halevy), Mr. Oliver King. 9.28 p.m.—“Stabat Mater” (Tartini), St. Francis’ Choir. 9.32 p.m.—Pianoforte Solo, “First Movement, Sonata in F Miner” (Beethoven), Miss Kathleen Fitzgerald. 9.38 p.m.—“Christus Vincit” (Taverna). St. Francis’ Choir. 9.48 p.m.—From the Studio: Musical Items. 10.0 p.m.—“Big Ben”; National Anthem; Close Down. 2BL, SYDNEY SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.45 a.m.—Special news service. 11.30 a.m.—Service broadcast from Randwick Presbyterian Church., Minister, Rev. W. J. Grant. ffi AFTERNOON SESSION. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special session for Children in Hospitals. 2.15 p.m.—H.M.V. Gramophone recital. d. 45 p.m.—Special Information Service. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Organ recita! by Mr. N. Robins broadcast from the Arcadia Theatre, Chatswood. 4 p.m.—Studio Programme. 5 P- m —G P-O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EVENING SESSION. 7.15 p.m.—Service broadcast from Petersham Baptist Church. 8.30 p.m.—Band recital by the North Sydney Tramway Band, broadcast from Manresa Hall, North Sydney. 9.15 p.m.—From the Studio:. Miss Amy Ostinga, contralto. 9.22 p.m.—Broadcasters Instrumental Trio 9.29 p.m.—Mr. Peter Sutherland, basso 9.36 p.m.—Mr. G. Vern Barnett, piano solos. 9.43 p.m.—Miss Amy Ostinga. 9.50 p.m.—Broadcasters Instrumental Trio. 9.57 p.m. Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. father report and forecast by courtesy of Mr. G. J. Mares, Government Meteorologist 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. 10.1 p m.—Mr. Peter Sutherland. 10.8 p.m.—Mr. G. Vern Barnett. 10 15 p.m.-—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. National Anthem. 2 UW, SYDNEY SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m.—Musical item. 10.35 a.m.—Vocal and instrumental recital by courtesy of His Masters Voice Gramophone Co. 11.50 a.m. —Studio item. 11.30 a.m.--Mu >»cal items and request numbers 12.30 p.m.—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.10 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental items ana request numbers. 8.45 p.m.—Weather forecast. 8.50 p.m.—Request numbers. 9.35 p.m.—Announcements. 9.30 p.m.—Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE. SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 ami.—Bells from St. Paul’s Cathedral. 10.45 a.m.—Express train information. British official wireless news from Rugby. News from yesterday’s papers. 11 a.m.—MORNING SERVICE FROM SCOTS' CHURCH, MELBOURNE. PREACHER: The Rev. DR. BORLAND. ORGANIST: MR. MANSLEY GREER. Paraphrase 41. “As when the Hebrew prophet.” Prayer. Tune 74. Prose Psalm 72, “Give the King thy judg. ments.” Chants 268 and 269. Old Testament Lesson—Ecclesiastes 12. Hymn 538, “Hosanna, Loud Hosanna.” Prayer and Intercession. New Testament Lesson—St. John 14/ —1 —l2. Anthem, “Sweet the moments, rich in bloss- ing which before the Cross we spend” (Arthur Godfrey). The Lord’s Prayer. (The congregation, standing, will unite.) Sermon, “Still greater deeds than these.” St. John 14/2.


S 8

•••»

A Circuit that amplifies its reception 2,500,000,000 times.. .! 1928 heralds new developments in radio Wonder* Box the New 6 Valve RCA Receiver Model Id NO “EARTH”— NO AERIAL. So sensitive is the R.C.A. Model 16 that you can actually operate it on local reception without earth wire or aerial, although normally these should be used. AMAZING VOLUME ON LONG DISTANCE RECEPTION. A flood of melody instead of the thin trickle of sound you have been used to. DISTORTIONLESS VOLUME, TOO. A special power valve was de- veloped to enable the Model 16 to reproduce its enormous vol- ume without trace of distortion. RICH, CLEAR TONE. The tone of a fine musical instrument. COMPACT as a fine Watch. The Model 16 can be carried easily and can be taken away to week-end cottages and on holi- days. RECEPTION amplified 2,500,000,000 times! Almost incredible yet true—as you can believe when you reflect that the Model 16 is the joint achievement of such organisations as the Radio Corporation of America, General Electric Company and others. Their combined genius has conceived unmatched refinements that depend on wire windings finer than a hair and adjustments closer than a thousandth of an inch. Take a peep inside the Model 16. What a miracle of compact- ness and precise engineering it is—and what results it gives. Blindfold you’d pick out this R.C.A. Receiver for its reproduction as instinctively as you would select a fine piano from its tone. And yet it is controlled by a single dial. See it—hear it to-day—at any of the best radio dealers. You will find its appearance worthy of its performance. The Model 16’s cabinet is made of solid polisned mahogany, while its speaker is the handsome dull bronze R.C.A. Model 100 A. t*sirofon General \ \a/ lUetric Company Ltd 93-95 Clarence Street SYDNEY 53 King Street Civic Centre NEWCASTLE CANBERRA 611 Dean Street ALBURY ONLY THE BEST IN RADIO WILL EVER SATISFY YOU


Prayer. Intimations. Offering. Offertory—“ The First Palm Sundhy” (Faure). Hymn 439, “Lift up your heads.” Benedition. 12.15 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. t p.m.—SONORA RECITAL OF THE WORLD’S MOST FAMOUS RECORDS. ORCHESTRA, “The Blue Bird” (O’Neill). By the Court Symphony Orchestra, conduc- ted by Norman O’Neill. Part 1. Dance of the Mist Maids. Part 2. Dance of Fire and Water. Part 3. Dance of the Stars. Part 4. Dance of the Hours. INSTRUMENTAL, “Silent Night, Holy Night” (arr. Sear). The J. H. Squire Celeste Octet. SONG. “La Villanelle” (Fan der Elst and Dell 'Acqua). Sung in French by Madame Viceroy Gossens, soprano. CHOIR —“The Day Thous Gavest” (J. Eller- ton and C. C. Schofield) The 8.8. C. Choir, conducted by Stanford Robinson. ORCHESTRAL—“Die Fledermaus” (The Bat) —(Johann Strauss) —Section Parts 1 and 2, by the Symphony Orchestra, con- ducted by Johann Strauss. VIOLIN SOLO—"Londonderry Air,” (arr. Albert Sammons) —Albert Sammons. ORCHESTRAL “Rosamunde” Overture (Schubert) —Parts 1 and 2. ORCHESTRA (a) “Aida”—Grand March (Verdi). (b) “Aida” Selection (introducing Temple scene. Act 1. Act 1, Celeste Aida. Ry the 8.8. C. Wireless Symphony Or- chestra, conducted by Percy Pitt. I p.m. PLEASANT SUNDAY AFTERNOON SERVICE FROM CENTRAL MISSION. WESLEY CHURCH. LONSDALE STREET. MELBOURNE. Chairman: REV. J. H. CAIN. Hymn No. 100, “Have you had a kindness shown 7” Prayer. Rev. C. Irving Benson. Orchestral Selection (G. M. Williams, con- ductor). Hymn No. 114. “God bless our Native Land.” Quartette, Colored Emperors of Harmony. Orchestra. Quartette, Colored Emperors of Harmony. Notices. Offering. Orchestra. ADDRESS— DR. J. W. SPRINGTHORPE, “The Magna Chart* of the Child.” National Anthem. Benediction. Orchestra. EVENING SESSION. CHILDREN’S HOUR. % p.m.—Answers to letters and birthday greetings by “BILLY BUNNY.” 6.25 p.m.—“BROTHER BILL.” “Stand On My Shoulder.” 6.46 p.m.—Bells from St. Paul’s Cathedral. NIGHT SESSION. 7 p.n,.—SERVICE FROM THE WELSH CHURCH, Latrobe Street, Melbourne. PREACHER: REV. D. GLYN JONES, B.A. Voluntary. Call to Worship. Hymn 49, “Austria.” Lesson : Romans 12. Hymn 236: “Capel-y-ddol.” Prayer. Solo, Mr. W. T. Evans. Announcements and offertory. Offertory Hymn, tune “Huddersfield.” Hymn 288, tune “TTewen.” SERMON—Mark 2—22. “NEW WINE DEMANDS NEW BOTTLES.” By Rev. D. GLYN JONES, B.A. Hymn 448, tune “Ellacombe.” Benedicition. Vesper. FROM THE STUDIO. 8.30 p.m.—Birthday greetings, programme an- nouncements and Island steamer movements. 8.32 p.m.—Song Feature of the week. 8.35 p.m.—BRUNSWICK CITY BAND: Overture, “Poet and Peasant” (Suppe). 8.45 p.m.—COMMUNITY SINGING FROM ST. DAVID’S HALL, Latrobe Street, Melbourne. Hymns. Violin solo. “Mazurka” (Drdla). Miss F. Scarcebrook. Hymns. Violin solo, “Romance” (Sfendsen). Miss F. Scarcebrook. Hymns. The following hymns have been chosen for Community Singing: Sung in Welsh. “Dyddiau Hyfryd” No. 10 “Llan-agan 14 “Bryn Calfaria” 18 “Pendyffryn i 9 “Liverpool” 20 “Tan-y-Castell” .i 21 “Cymod” 22 Lychur Dagrau” 25 Sung in English. “Onward, Christian Soldiers” 444 “Lead, Kindly Light” 416 FROM THE STUDIO. 9.20 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone. “Babylon” (Adams). “Thanks be to God” (Dickson). 9.27 p.m.—BRUNSWICK CITY BAND: “Two Chorales by Bach” (Hume). 9.35 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone: “How lovely are thy dwellings” (Liddle). “O, Flower Divine” (Wood!. 9.42 p.m.—BRUNSWICK CITY BAND: Suite, “A Rustic Holiday” (Rimmer). 1. “In the Cornfields.” 2. “A Scamper in the Feilds.” 3. “By the Old Church.” 9.54 p.m.—"Argus” news service. Announce- ments. The Royal Automobile Club of Victoria’s SAFETY MESSAGE for to-day is for MOTORISTS: “All crossings require your careful attention, whether guarded or not; crossing bells are sometimes out of order; watchmen or gate operators may be off duty.” OUR GREAT THOUGHT: The Golden Rule in Different Countries. In eight different religious philosophies there are to be found distinct statements embodying the spirit of the Golden Rule. The spirit and meaning of all these state- ments is for all general purposes the same. The most generally used form of the Golden Rule is: “Whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, do you even unto them.” The following are four of the principal statements of the same principle in other religious philosophies—the remaining four will be given to-morrow (Monday) night. “Do as you would be done by.”—Persian. “Do not that to a neighbor which you shall take ill from him.” —Greek. “What you would not wish done to your- self do not do unto others.” —Confucianist. “One should seek for others the happiness which one desires for oneself.”—Buddhist. 10 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING CHURCH SESSION. 10.30 a.m.—Chimes from St. John’s Church, Toorak. 11 a.m.—Morning Service from Cairns Memo- rial Church, East Melbourne. Minister, Rev. F. A. Hagenauer M.A. AFTERNOON SESSION. “CELEBRITY CONCERT.” 3 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute, Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin, Miss Ethel Brearley, piano. 3.16 p.m.—Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin: 3.35 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute, “Second Sonata” (Platti). 3.48 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute, Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin, Miss Ethel Brearley, piano: “Trio, Op. 119” (Kuhlau). 4.5 p.m.—Mr. Charles Trewavis, baritone. 4.13 p.m.—Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin. 4.18 p.m.-—Miss Ethel Brearley, piano: “Star of Eve” (Wagner). 4.22 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute: 4.30 p.m.—God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. 6 p.m.—Special Children’s Hour. EVENING CHURCH SESSION. 7 p.m.—Evening Service from St. Alban’s Church of England, Armidale, during which the Crucifixion by Stainer will be rendered umder 'the conductorship of Mr. A. J. Pallett. Minister, Rev. E. Denton Fethers. EVENING SESSION. 8.30 p.m.—Brunswick Panatrope Entertain- ment. Broadcast from Panatrope House, 252 Collins Street, Melbourne (by exclusive permission of Wills and* Paton Ltd.) under the direction of the Panatrope Committee. 8.31 p.m.—Columbia Concert Orchestra: Overture, “Light Cavalry” (Suppe. In two parts). 8.38 p.m.—Signor Riccardo Stracciari, bari- tone : “Ideale” (Tosti). “Elegie” (Massenet). 8.46 p.m.—Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra: “Dernier Sommereil de la Vierge” (Mas- senet). “Coppelia Ballet” (Delibes). 8.54 p.m.—Mr. Phil Ohman and Mr. Victor Arden, piano duet: “Dizzy Fingers” (Confrey). “Polly” (Zamecnik). 9 p.m.—The Regimental Band of His Majesty Grenadier Guards: “The British Army Fantasia” (Jullien) In two parts . 9.8 p.m.—Signor Manuello, violin : “Roses of Picardy” (Haydn-Woods). “Love’s Garden of Roses” (Haydn Woods). 9.14 p.m.—Jacques Jacob’s Orchestra: “L’Estudiantina” (Waldteufel). “Espana Waltz.” 9.22 p.m.—Mr. Franklin Baur, tenor: “Cheritza” (Ford). “To-night you belong to me” (Rose). 9.28 p.m.—St. Hilda Colliery Prize Band: “Rustic Scenes—A Sailor’s Life” (S. Cope). In two parts. 9.34 p.m.—Mr. Milton Charles, Organ: “When day is done” (de Sylva). “Just once again” (Donaldson). 9.40 p.m.—Miss Elizabeth Rethberg, Soprano: “Largo” (Handel). “Rendi 1’ Serano al Giglo” (Handel). 9.48 p.m.—The Regimental Band of His Majesty’s Grenadier Guards: “The British Army Fantasia” (Jullien). Nos. 3, 4 and 5. 9.54 p.m.—The “Age” News Bulletin, ex- clusive to 3AR. 9.58 p.m.—Weather forecast. 9.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good Night quote is taken from the poem “Loraine,” by George Essex Evans. 10 p.m.—God Save the King.


s - 7 if . I r ‘ -. érmfksgg. , . 15g, ”’4' ‘L , 5;; .‘, I. 1: g " .13.}; 5p . .u‘ . ,n‘ I, i‘ r fl”; EV- A xi . E : “A“ f! ‘ A I. ’1 ‘ ‘ a ‘ 7‘5“" , Mi » "m, ‘.1 'm .~;_ 7' f , ‘ 3-4; h - J. . 2. l. ”VJ-”"35. , ' v . 7’ N (533;. ; - f; V r _ .' . {1:3,} fa‘iz it; :g-Iiwigl j ' ‘ "H \. M‘ , f!“ m ‘fi&:y""¢‘§£‘t {$6, 'm'; .l ' V” (E. ,: \ h , . v ‘ _5“ :1... “e7 , ,. v .. .u A _ "min. A“ 2} . ‘4‘ 1-2“, fl, 7'". "hf: I, a r? ' 3—. 1,. fig! - if ..-.. ‘3, J u .. ‘4 p “.3 an ,, 5‘. "K“!- :v W ’ 7_ N. ' .. , “ ‘ I‘ . .V .‘.-, . , H ' ’,‘ a . o . I .‘ ‘ [u ‘ ...,~’~§:C: - f 1 . ’6» w 317131. h,” . ‘_ gym-m», “sf? pm; 1;.)HK “hr“: ’7: v : h I ‘! I v". 5'3""';‘ 6". ‘ ’20! ‘ ‘ , 3w: ‘ 7 «golf-1%. ‘ .I . . 1‘ J -, <. V4! I. Vi. u ., 2mm 34' , . ‘ 5 . 3 . . "' l .‘ 'hr 1‘ .JW :. ~ _- -, '4'. n ‘ . ”4“” A. 3}“; . I J , . ..,_ x ‘ -s. _-,-,, m... 21’ J‘- .. , 1-, .., 3:" a. ,_____1, 1’: . . | , ‘ ‘ 1 x _ , v.23, AL. 3:: 394.»; ' ":‘w w J.\‘-:’? ‘~. _- pay. _ ‘ .. . . .. ‘ . .' V .' . afflufi- . ”3%“. .‘- . Emmco ABC 350 milliamp (.25 valve) type, particularly designed for use with tubes drawing .25 of an amp. each, the 350 milliamp type Emmco “ABC” Eliminator is constructed especially for the currents and voltages of Australian and New Zealand electric AC lighting mains. The Eliminator functions perfectly with sets employ- ing the following valves: Radiotron 201 A, Philips C 509 and C 507, or any other type of valve taking .25 amps on the flilament. PRICE, £l9/19/-. EMMCO ABC 85 milliamp. (.06 valve) type. Designed for use with sets em- ploying .06 type valves. Supplies A B and C current direct from the light socket. No Batteries. PRICE: Complete, including B.H. Raytheon Valve, Cord and Adaptor .. £l5/15/- EMMCO SUPER POWER ELMIN- ATOR, handsomely finished with a neat metal case and Bakeltie top. Especi- ally designed for use with multi-valve sets. Built locally for the exact re- quirements of Australian A.C. Electric Lighting mains. No acids or batteries. Requires no changes in the wiring of your receiver. Noiseless, permanent power. PRICE. including B.H. Raytheon Valve £ 12/12/- EMMCO “B” BATTERY ELIMIN- ATOR, particularly for sets up to five valves. Suitable for any type of valves. Beautifully finished with Bakelite top and enclosed in a neat metal case. Measures BMsin. x sin. x weighs 141 b. Fitted with the well-known Raytheon Valve. Especially construc- ted for use with the Australian A.C. Mains. Thousands are in use through- out Australia and New Zealand. PRICE, Complete, with Cord and Adaptor £lO/10/- EMMCO has never made finer or better radio appara- tus than these Eliminators. Here is a complete quality line of B Battery Elimina- tors and straight-out A.B.C, Eliminators. Take your choice. So great has been the public demand for these EMMCO Eliminators that the output has been enor- mously increased during the last few weeks. Their undoubted efficiency, their punch and power are recog- nised and appreciated by the thousands of peoph* who use them throughout Austria and New Zealand. They not only supply un- failing unchanging power, but due to their steady, powerful operation th.ey give you far better recep- tion. With their use you will find your receiver reaching out and bringing in stations with a punch that will surprise you. MAKE UP YOUR MIND NOW TO FIT ONE OF THESE EMMCO ELEC- TRICAL RADIO POWER UNITS TO YOUR SET. MADE BY ELECTRICITY METER MFG. CO. LTD. AT A bib [DBAbBGGS


4QG, BRISBANE. SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. PALM SUNDAY. The early morning service will Ibe relayed from St- Barnabas Church of England, Waterworks Road, Brisbane. 7.15 a.m. —Blessing of Palms; Hymn 99, “Ride on! Fide on in Majesty”; Lesson, Exodus Chap. 15, from verse 23 ; Hymn and Chorus, “Crown Ye With Palms” ; Holy Gospel, St. Matthews, Chap. 21, to verse 16; Prayers; Hymn 98, “All Glory, Laud and Honour”; Holy Eucharist; Intoit, “Blessed is He That Cometh” ; Epistle, Phillipians, Chap, 2, verses 5 to 11 ; Holy Gospel of the Passing, St. Matthew, Chap. 27 to verse 54; Hymns: 105, “In the Lord’s Atoning Grief”; 255, “Ju6t As I Am”; 107, “Glory be to Jesus.” Ad- dress by the Rev. Canon Garland. 8.30 p.m.—Close down. MORNING SESSION. The complete morning service will be re- layed from St. Barnabas Church of England, Waterworks Road, Red Hill. 11 a,m.—Holy Eucharist, sung by congregation to Merbecke’s music ; Epistle and Holy Gospel as above; Hymns—9B “All Glory, Laud and Honour,” 184 “Rock _of Ages’; Chorus, “Crown Ye with Palms” ; Hymns—99 “Ride on! Ride on in Majesty I” 312 “Thee We Adore, O Hidden Saviour,” 108 “When I Survey the Wondrous Cross” ; sermon by the Rev. Canon Garland. 11.30 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. The concert by the Brisbane Citizens’ Band will be relayed from the Botanic Gardens. 8.15 p.m.—Band concert., 4-30 pjn.—Close down. NIGHT SESSION. The complete evening service will be re- layed from St. Barnabas Church of England, Red Hill. 7 p.m.—Children’s Session : Hymns—322, 'There is a Green Hill,” 103 “Glory be to Jesus”; Lesson, St .Luke, Chap, 23, verses 83 to 49 ; Children’s Catechising. 7.30 p.m.—Evensong—Psalm 22, Lessons Isaih Chap. 52 from verse 13, and Chapter 63 ; St. John, Chap, 19 to verse 37 Hymns—94, “Lord in This Thy Mercy’s Day,” 105 “My God I Love Thee,” 114 “O Come and Mourn.” Sermon by the Rev. Canon Garland. 8.30 p.m.—Benediction. BAND CONCERT. At the eon elusion of the church service the concert by the Brisbane Municipal Concert Band will be relayed from Wickham Park. 9-30 p.m.—Close down. SCL, ADELAIDE. SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.45 ajn.—Carillon of bells from St- Andrew’s Church, Walkerville. 11 a.m.—-G.P.O. Chimes. 11.1 a_m. —Divine Service relayed from Uni- tarian Church, Wakefield Street, Adelaide. 12.10 p.m. (Approx).—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Sunday afternoon concert from Church of Christ, Tabernacle, Norwood, ar- ranged by Evangelist E. G. Hinrichsen. 4 p.m. (Approx).—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.31 p.m.—Carillon of bells from St. Andrew’s Church, Walkerville. 6.35 p.m.—Running time of East-West Express. 6.37 p.m.—Sunday story for the children by the “Bird Lady.” 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—Relayed from Malvern Methodist Church, Evening Divine Service. 8.15 p.m.—Sacred Concert from Malvern Met- hodist Church. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 9.1 p.m.—Band concert relayed from Henley Beach Rotunda, by Holden’s Silver Band. 9.30 p.m.—Educational talk by Mr. P. H. Nic- holls. 9.45 p.m.—An address “Adelaide’s Churches, No. 4” by Mr. A. L. Brown. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—British Wireless news. 10.5 p.m.—Monday’s programme and meteo- rological information. 10.10 p.m.—National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH. SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.45 a.m.—Tune in. 11 a.m.—Morning church service. 12.15 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Tune in. 8.35 p.m.—From the Studio. Musical programme, including vocal and in- strumental artists.

  • .30 p.m.—Close down.

EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Tune in. The evening transmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 7.6 p.m.—Children’s bedtinys stories. 7.30 p.m.—Evening church service. 8.45 p.m.—A relay. Concert by the Perth City Band, conducted by Mr. L. M. Price, and items by vocal assisting artists, relayed from the Govern- ment Gardens, Perth. 10.5 p.m.—Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5 metres of Programme given on 1250 metres, commen- cing at 7 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART SUNDAY, Ist APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—Divine Service from St. Davids Cat. hedral, Hobart. AFTERNOON SESSION. 8.80 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. Concert from *the Studio. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.80 p.m.—Children’s Corner with the Sunday Lady. NIGHT SESSION. 7 p.m.—Church Service from Melville Street Methodist Church, Hobart. Preacher, Rev. Robert Williams. At conclusion of Church Service, Concert from the Studio or Band Concert from St. Davids Park. 9.40 p.m.—Mercury special Interstate news ser- vice. British Official Wireless news. Ships within wireless range. 9 p.m. Weather fore- casts. Station announcements. Monday’# programme. Close down. Monday, April 2 2FC, SYDNEY EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.0 a.m. to 8.0 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10.0 a.m.—“Big Ben” and Announcements. 10.5 a.m. —Studio Music. 10.15 a.m.—“Sydney Morning Herald” News Service. 10.30 a.m.—Studio Music. 10.35 a.m.—Last Minute Racing Information by the 2FC Commissioner. 10.45 a.m. —Studio Music. 11.0 a.m.—“Big Ben” ; Studio Music. 11.5 a.m. —A.P.A. and Reuter’s Cable Services 11.15 a.m.—A Reading. 11.30 a.m.—Close Down. MIDDAY SESSION. 12.0 noon.—“ Big Ben” and Announcements. 12.2 p.m.—Stock Exchange, first call. 12.3 p.m.—Weather Forecast, Rainfall. 12.5 a.m.—Studio Music. 12.10 p.m.—Summary of “Sydney Morning Herald” News Service. 12.15 p.m.—Rugby Wireless News. 12.20 p.m.—Studio Music. 1.0 p.m.—“Big Ben” ; Weather Intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” Midday News Ser- vice ; Producers’ Distributing Society’s Re- port. 1.20 p.m.—Studio Music. 1.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange, second call. 1.30 p.m.—Richard Parry, Basso. 1.35 p.m.—Studio Music. 1.55 p.m.—Richard Parry, Basso. 2.0 p.m.—“Big Ben” ; Close Down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.0 p m.—“ Big Ben” and Announcements. 3.5 p.m.—William Bowyer (basso), and Elsie Rolfing (contralto) : “Snowdrops” (Lehmann). 3.9 p.m.—James Walker, Pianoforte Solos (Pupil of Mr. Frank Hutchens). 3.17 p.m.—Florence Grant, Soprano. 3.20 p.m.—A Reading. 3.35 p.m.—Doris Hestelow, Mezzo. 3.40 p.m.—Popular Records. 3.55 p.m.—James Walker, Pianoforte Solo (Pupil of Frank Hutchens). 4.5 p.m.—William Bowyer (Basso), and Elsie Rolfing (Contralto) : Duet, “Kingfisher Blue” (Finden). 4.10 p.m.—A Talk. 4.25 p.m.—Florence Grant, Soprano: 4.30 p.m.—Popular Records. 4.40 p.m.—Florence Grant, Soprano. 4.45 p.m.—Stock Exchange, third call. 4.47 p.m.—James Walker, Pianoforte Solo. 4.52 p.m.—Doris Hestelow, Mezzo. 4.55 p.m.—Popular record, and result of the Cricket Match played in N.Z. to-day; Aus- tralia versus N.Z. 5.0 p.m.—“Big Ben”; Close Down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The Chimes of 2FC. 6.45 p.m.—The “Hello Man” Talks to the Children. 6.15 p.m.—Story Time for the Young Folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner Music, by the Pavilion Cafe Trio. 7.0 p.m.—“Big Ben” ; Late Sporting News. 7.10 p.m.—Dalgety’s Market Reports (Wool, Wheat and Stock). 7.18 p.m.—Fruit and Vegetable Markets. 7.22 p.m.—Weather and Shipping News. 7.26 p.m.—“Evening News” Late News Serw vice. NIGHT SESSION. 7.35 p.m.—Programme Announcements, 7.38 p.m.—From the Sydney Town Hall, Public Welcome to “The Waratahs.” Selections on the Grand Organ. Christian Hellemann. 8.0 p.m.—Arrival of the Chairman and Dis- tinguished Guests. 8.5 p.m.—“Advance Australia Fair,” Com- munity Song. Christian Hellemann at the Grand Organ. Sydney Calland (Baritone), Roy Allen (Tenor), and the audience.


10/6 Another VIKING arrives in Australia ! TO join that other famous “Viking;”—the Audio Fre- quency Transformer now comes the “Viking” Vernier Dial. Here it is on the right, and it’s yours for 5/-. Handsome, isn’t it? And gives you velvet control. On the left is illustrated the “Viking” Transformer. Gives you tons of volume, but no distortion. Price, 10/6. Ask your dealer for both “Vikings.” .so The Range of RADIO PARTS Nothing Cheaper WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS FOR N.S.W. Fox & Macgillycuddy Ltd., Sydney Harringtons Ltd. - - - Sydney A. G. Healing Ltd. - - - Sydney Weldon Electric Supply Co. Ltd. Sydney Nothing Better!


8.10 p.m.—Arrival of the New South Wales Representative Team. (Announced by Mr. Harold West.) 8.15 p.m.—Organ: March, “Entry of the Gladiators,” Christian Hellemann. 8.20 p.m. —Song, “Warstah Blues” (specially written for the occasion by Mrs. Greatorex, the mother of T. Greatorex, the “Waratah” Forward). Sung by Sydney Calland, Baritone. 8.25 p.m.—Ruperx Hazel and Elsie Day: Entertainers. 8.32 p.m.—Community Singing. 8.45 p.m.—From Farmer’s Luncheon Hall: The Speeches at the Annual Dinner of the Aero Cl ib. 5.15 p.m. -From the Sydney Towp Hall: Con- tinuation of the programme in connection with the welcome of the “Waratahs.” . Selection on the Grand Organ, Christian Helleman. 9.22 p.m.—Song. Selected. Sydney Calland, Baritone. 9.26 p.m.—Replies by the Manager and Cap- tain of “The Waratahs.” 9.45 p.m.—Rupert Hazel and Elsie Day: Entertainers. 9.52 p.m.—Community Singing. 10.0 p.m.—“Big Ben”; From the Studio: Henry Silver in the first of a weekly series of Graphology talka. 10.15 p.m.—Edna Dowse, Violinist. 10.22 p.m.—Len Maurice, Popular Baritone. 10.30 p.m.—Late Weather Forecast; Edna Dowse, Violinist. 10.38 p.m.—Len Maurice. Dance Session. 10.58 p.m.—To-morrow's Programme and Late News. 11.11 p.m.—“Big Ben”; National Anthem; Close Down. 2BL, SYDNEY. MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Musical programme from studio. 10.40 a.m. —News from the “Daily Telegraph Pictorial.” 10.50 a.m. —Musical programme from the studio. ffi 11 a.m. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Talk on “Sport” by Miss Gwen Varley, Broadcasters Women’s Sports Authority. Social Notes —Replies to correspondents. Talk on “Preserves” by Mrs. Jordan. 12 noon. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special Ocean forecast and weather reports. 12.3 p.m.—Musical programme from the studio 12.8 p.m.—lnformation, Mails, Shipping, and port directory. 12.12 p.m.—Boats in call by wireless. 12.14 p.m.—Fruit Market reports. 12.16 p.m.—Vegetable Market Report. 12.18 p.m.—Dairy Farm and produce Market report. 12.22 p.m.—Forage Market report. 12.24 p.m. —Fish Market Report. 12.26 p.m.—Rabbit Market report. 12.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 12.30 p.m.—H.M.V. Gramophone Ricital. 1.27 p.m.—Stock Exchange Report. 1.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Talk to children and special entertainment for children in Hospital. 2 p. m .— G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. Racing information broadcast immediately after each race by courtesy of the “Sun” newspapers. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. News from the “Sun.” 8.10 p.m. —Musical programme from the studio 8.20 p.m. —News from the “Sun.” 3.30 p.m. —Musical programme from studio. 8.40 p.m. —Dungowan Dance Band broadcast from Dungowan Cabaret. 4 p.m. —G.P.O. Clock and chimes. News from the “Sun.” ffi 4.8 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio 4.15 p.m.—Talk on “The Women of fAncient Rome.” 4.30 p.m.—Dungowan Dance Band. 4.50 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 4.57 p.m.—Features of evening’s programme. 4.59 p.m.—Racing resume. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. SPECIAL COUNTRY SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Australian Mercantile Land and Finance Co’s report. ffi Weather report and forecast by courtesy of

  • Govt. Meteorologist.

Producuers Distributing Society’s Fruit and Vegetable Market report. Stock Exchange report. Grain and Fodder report (“Sun.”) Dairy Produce Report (“Sun.”) 6.45 p.m.—Country news from the Studio. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Gulbransen Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m. —Talk on “The Motor Car" and its Idiosyncrasieo” by Mr. Martin, Manager of Central Motor Agencies, Hurstville. During the day descriptions will be given from the R!oyal Agriccultural Show. At the Sydney Agricultural Grounds. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Scotch Night. 8.1 p.m. Miss Ina Thornton, soprano. 8.8 p.m. The Wurlitzer organ broadcast from the Arcadia Theatre, Chatswood, Organist Mr. N. Robins. ffi 8.15 p.m.—Mr. F. Stewart Jarbo, elocutionist. 8.22 p.m.—Miss Bunty Stuart, contralto. 8.29 p.m.—Seres and Vita, harp and violin. 8.36 p.m.—Mr. Peter Sutherland, basso. 8.43 p.m.—Tooth’s Brewery Band. 9.3 p.m.—Mr. Douglas Graham, Scotch comedian, ffl 9.10 p.m.—Miss Ina Thornton. 9.17 p.m.—Mr. F. Stewart Jarbo. 9.24 p.m.—Miss Bunty Stuart. 9.31 p.m.—Seres and Vita. 9.3 s p.m.—Mr. Peterf Sutherland. 9.45 p.m. -Tooth’s Brewery Band. 10.5 p.m.—Mr. Douglas Graham. 10.12 p.m.—Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. Weather report and forecast by courtesy of Mr. J. C. Mares Govt. Meteorologist. 10.16 p.m. The Wurlitzer Organ Broadcast from the Arcadia Theatre, Chatswood. 10-30 p.m.•- Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra under the direction of Mr. Merv. Lyons. Broadcast from Romano’s. During intervals between dances “Sun” news w’ill be broadcast. 11.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes.. National Anthem. 2 UW, SYDNEY MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.4 p.m.—Where to Go. 7.10 p.m.—Dinner music. 7.40 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental items. 7.50 p.m. —Mr. Robert Meadows, euphonium solo: Selected. 7.55 p.m. —Studio items. 8 p.m.—News items. 8.10 p.m.—Mrs. A. Dalton, pianoforte solo: Selected. 8.17 p.m.—Studio Item. 8.21 p.m.—Mrs. A. Pearce, violin solos Selected. 8.25 p.m. —Studio item. 8.29 p.m. —Mr. Robert Meadows, euphonium solo: Selected. 8.36 p.m.—Studio item. 8.40 p.m.—Mrs. A. Dalton, pianoforte solo: Selected. 8.47 p.m.—Weather forecast. 8.50 p.m.—Mrs. A. Pearce, violin aolo: Selected. 9 p.m.—Dance music. 9.58 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE. MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m.—Tonic Tones. 7.20 a.m.—PHYSICAL CULTURE EXER- CISES (to music). 7.27 a.m. —Tonic Tones. 7.33 a.m. —Weather Forecast for all States; Mails. 7.40 a.m.—News. 8.0 a.m. —Melbourne Observatory Time Sgnal. 8.1 a.m. —Tonic Tones. 8.5 a.m.—NEWS. Sporting Information; Shipping; Stock Exchange Information. 8.13 a.m. —Tonic Tones. 8.15 a.m.—Close Down. MIDDAY SESSION. 11.0 a.m.—3LO’S CULINARY ‘COUNSELS or how to create creature comforts with a minimum of cash. APPLE SPONGE. 21b. apples. 2 tablespoons sugar. 1 teaspoon C. tartar. 2oz. butter. 5 cloves. % pint milk. Vj lb. flour. % teaspoon C. soda. 2oz. sugar. METHOD: —(1) Peel apples and core and quarter them. (2) Put them into saucepan with a little water and 2 tablespoons sugar and the cloves. (3) When tender, turn them into a pie dish. (4) Sift flour, cream tartar and soda. (5) Rub in butter and sugar. (6) Make hole in centre of flour, into which pour the egg. (7) With a wooden spoon beat the flour into the egg. (8) Gradually add the milk, beat- ing all the time. (9) Pour this mixture over the stewed apples in the pie dish. (10) Bake in quick oven for about 20 minutes. (11) Serve in dish with serviette pinned round. 11.1 a.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN.— Grow your own vegetables. Now is the time to plant CARROTS. Sow the seed thinly in rows where the plants are to mature. A Vi inch is quite deep enough. Allow about 15 inches between the rows. Do not sow carrots in ground containing a large quantity of fresh manure, otherwise roots will fork, and be useless. Ground which has been heavily manured for a crop of cabbages or cauliflowers, and which has given a good y’sld, will prove rich enough without adding any more plant food. 11.5 a.m. —MISS FLORENCE PELL, Inspec- tor of Schools: A Talk on Cooking. 11.20 a.m.' —Musical Interlude. 11.25 a.m. —Under the auspices of the Royal Victorian Institute of Architects, Mrs. L. L. PHILLIPS, A.R.V.1.A., will speak on: “How the Architect Helps the Housewife.” 11.40 a.m. —Musical interlude. 11.45 a.m. —FRANCIS FRASER: “Books in the Home.” MIDDAY SESSION. CURRENT CHRONICLES. 12.0 noon. —MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY TIME SIGNAL. 12.1 p.m.—British Official Wireless News from Rugby ; Reuter’s and the Australian Press Association Cables; “Argus” Nows Service. “OVER THE TREE-TOPS WE FLOAT THEE A SONG.” 12.15 p.m.—COMMUNITY SINGING, trans- mitted from the Assembly Hall, Collins Street, Melbourne. Conductor, G. J. MACK AY, assisted by BERTHA JORGEN- SEN’S QUARTETTE. SOLOISTS. And now we are sure you will join us in extending a hearty welcome to our friends — FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ, who are with us again for a short season— Duet, “Imi au ia oe.” Song, “Like no a Like.” Steel Guitar, “Halona Waltz.** Duet, “Ukulele Dream Girl.”


<D © © •~fe HE ability to choose your own programme from the various stations 1 ! s “ great boon! It means that if you do not care for the jazz from OUT INTERFERENCE. 6 ' y ° U 680 tU ” e “ elsewhere-WITH- Selectivity depends primarily upon the kind of condenser your set possesses. Any condenser may permit you to tune in 3LO, 4QG, 2FC SCL, and other' stations, but if your logging of them is all crowded on one smal section of the dial, you are apt to have the lecture from this station elbowing its way into the concert programme from that. Choose the “ADVANCE” STRAIGHT LINE FREQUENCY CON- DENSER, WHICH DOES AWAY WITH ALL STATION-BUNCHING It is designed for multiple mounting, is in a one piece frame, and is most rigid. Don’t forget the name—“ Advance.” Your dealer has it. Now available in brass. Prices II- higher .00025 .0005 .00035 10/6 10/- 9/6 W!vof««»le Distributors for N.S.W.; FOX & MACGILXJ LTD., SYDNEY. And HARRINGTONS, LtcL, SYDNEY. A A Improved STRAIGHT LINE CONDENSER Manufactured in Australia by RADIO CORPORATION OF AUSTRALIA PTY. LTD. MELBOURNE SYDNEY : ADELAIDE ' BRISBANE


MAY ALBERTA, Soprano: “Two Old English Folk Songs.” 1.45 p.m.—FROM THE STUDIO: Stock Ex- change Information; Meteorological Infor- mation ; Weatner Forecast and Rainfall lor Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, and New South Wales; Ocean Forecasts; River Reports ; Announcements. 1.55 p.m.—Under the auspices of the National Safety Council of Australia, ALURED KELLY, president of the R.A.C.V., will speak on: “Safety First.” 2.10 p.m.—Sporting Results. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.15 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA. “All the Fun of the Fair” (Percy Fletcher). “Quality Court” (Percy Fletcher). “Dancing on the Green” (Percy Fletcher). £.25 p.m.—T. JAMES LLOYD, Tenor: “Forgotten.” “At Sundown.” 2.30 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “A Musical Switch” (Alford). 2.40 p.m.—FRANCES LEA, Soprano. “The Greatest Wish in the World” (Del Riego). “La Paloma” (S. Yradier). 2.47 p.m.—THE KNOCKABOUTS. Those Scin- tillating, Syncopating, Sentimentalists, in: “All the Flare of the Fair.” 2.54 p.m. —FRANK and FRANCES LUIZ: Duet, “Akahi Oi.” Song, “A Song to Hawaii.” Steel Guitar, “Hawaiian Hotel.” Duet, “My Sweet Hawaiian Hula Girl. * 8.3 p.m.—Sporting Results. 8.4 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Sketch, “Down South.” “Four Dances from The Rebel Maid (Phillips). 8.20 p.m.—NED TYRRELL, Banjo* Selected. . , , . , 8.23 p.m.—And now our special feature foe this week's programme, and we promise a great treat to all music-lovers: THE FOUR COLORED EMPERORS OF HARMONY, in: “Oh! Miss Hannah.” “By and Bye.” “What Band.” “Jump Back, Honeyt” §B5 p.m.— THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection from “The Passing Show” (Finch) 8.44 p.m.—NORMAN PILL. Comedian: “Mulligan’s Picture Show.” ‘‘Wheels ” § 50 p m.-“THE KNOCKABOUTS”—The Scintillating. Syncopating. Sentimentalists “All the Flare o? the Fair * §.57 p.m.—T. JAMES LLOYD Tenor: “Love is Jnst a Little Bit of Heaven.- “Pale Moon.” 4.3 p.m. —Sporting Results. 4.4 p.m.—GILBERT BISHOP. Violin: Selected. 4 9 p.m.—FRANCES LEA. Soprano: “Kiss and Make Up” (Hoyle). “Cheerie-Beerie-Bee” (Wayne). A 4 16 p.m.— THE STATION ORCHESTRA* Selection, “The Street Singer” (Simson). INTERLUDE. 4 •£ p.m.—J. HOWLETT ROSS will talk on the origin of “April Fool s Day. 44! p.m.— THE STATION ORCHESTRA: '“Chevalier’s Coster Songs.” .. 4.51 p.m.—Weather Report from Adelaide; Weather Report from Mildura District. 4.52 p.m.—NORMAN PILL. Comedian: “Johnson’s Jubilee.” •'The Serial Stcry.” . . _ 80 p. m . —“Herald” News Service; Stock Ex- change Information. 5.15 p.m.—Sporting Results. 6.20 p.m.—Close Down. EVENING SESSION.

  • fl n m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday

GrSSngs by “BILLY BUNNY, c 25 P m. —Musical Interlude. 6.30 p P m.— CAPTAIN DONALD MACLEAN: “The Spanish Conquests.” “How the Dons discovered the Treasures of the World.” 6 45 p.m—Musical Interlude. 6:50 p.m.—“BILLY BUNNY.” Stories of the Australian Bush. NEWS AND MARKET REPORTS. 7.0 p.m.—Acceptances for Sunbury Races; Re- sults of University Cricket, Urmond v. yueen’s, at University brounus. Omcial Report of Newmaiset Stock Sales my the Associated Stock and biation rrg-n-s, bourke Street, Meioourne ; in umber of Sneep and battle drawn lor week’s sales. 7.10 p.m.—"Herald” News Service; Weather Synopsis; Shipping Movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange miormation. 7.17 p.m.—Fish Market Reporus Dy J. R. Borrett, Ltd.; Ramnt Prices. 7.19 p.m.—River Reports. 7.21 p.m.— Market Reports by the Victorian Producers’ Co-operative Co., Ltd. ; Poultry, Grain, Hay, Straw, Jute, Dairy Produce, Potatoes and Onions; Market Rep ..res of Fruit by the Victorian Fruitgrowers’ As- sociation; Retail Prices; WnolesaL Prices of Fruit by the Wholesale Fruit Merchants’ Association ; Citrus Fruits. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Under the auspices of the BOY SCuUrS’ ASSOCIATION, Dr. C. GORDON McADAM. will speak on: “Easter Scouting.” 7.45 p.m.—E. C. H. TAYLOR wSI speak to young Australia on: “School Life and School Sport.” 8.0 p.m.- Birthday Greetings and Programme Announcements. A PROGRAMME OF CONTRASTS. 8.1 p.m.— SOUTHEY’S MANDOLIN BAND: Waltz Song, “Calm Hawaiian Seas” (Len Mackay). Characteristic Intermezzo, “In a Monastery Garden” (Ketelby). 8.10 p.m.—ERNEST SAGE, Baritone: “Why do the Nations so furiously rage to- gether” (Handel). “Nita Gitana” (K. Newton). OF INTEREST TO ALL ATHLETES! 8.17 p.m.—Presentation of 3LO Championship Cup to Y.M.C.A. Swimming Club, winners of the 3 mile teams swimming Champion- ship of Victoria, by H. A. BENNETT, Esq., President of the Victorian Amateur Swim- ming Association. 8.22 p.m.—SOUTHEY’S MANDOLIN BAND: Selection. "Melodies we all love.” Especially selected and arranged by A. C. Southey. WAR MEMORIAL APPEAL. “Even as we utter the words 'we shall ever remember* we begin to forget. To for- get is to betray; for it is to be false to the men who fell, to Qje cause for which they fell, and to ourselves. Let the whole people join in creating such a monument as will keep the names and memories of

  • these men fresh in the minds of our child-

ren’s children.”—Slß WILLIAM IRVINE. 8.30 p.m.—Launching of the War Memorial Appeal by His Excellency the Governor of Victoria. Lo’d Somers; also addresses by the Lord Ma /or of Melbourne, Sir Stephen Morell; the Premier of Victoria, Mr. E. J. Hogan ; Sir John Monash, K.C.M.G. ; V.D. ; and Mr. Ernest Turnbull, President of the Victorian Branch of the R.S.S.I.L.A. Transmission from the Town Hall, Mel- bourne. STUDIO PROGRAMME CONTINUED. 9.0 p.m.—“THE FOUR COLORED EM- PERORS OF HARMONY”: “Ain’t it a Shame?” “Roll, Jordon, Roll.” “Old Black Joe.” “Negro Yodel.” 9.12 p.m.—SOUTHEY’S MANDOLIN BAND: Song, “Roses of Picardy” (Haydn Wood). Song, “Just a Cottage Small.” 9.22 p.m.—ERNEST SAGE, Baritone: “To Althea from Prison” (Parry). “Why so pale and wan?” (Parry). GRAND OPERA. 9.30 p.m.—STUDIO PRESENTATION OF “IL TROVATORE,” Conducted by J. SUTTON CROW, assisted by the UNIVERSITY CHORAL CHOIR. CAST: Leonora, MADAME ELSIE DAVIES. Count di Luna, CHAS. EVANS. Manrico, JOHN D. SULLIVAN. Azucena, INA LILLYCRAP. Inez, MAJORIE ROBISON. Ruiz, COLIN NASH. 10.45 p.m.—“Argus” News Service; Meteoro- logical Information ; Briti Official W ire- less News from Rugby ; Island Steam Move- ments. iHE ROYAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF VICTORIA'S SAFETY MESSAGE for to- day is:— "Be especially careful afc crossings where there is more than one track. Do not cross directly behind a train that has just gone by. Another train may be coming in the opposite direction on the next track ” Results cf Green Mill Roller Cycling Championship of Victoria. 11.0 p.m.—OUR GREAT THOUGHT—THE GOLDEN RULE IN DIFFERENT COUN- TRIES : ‘‘He sought for others the good he de- sired for himseif. Let him pass on.” — Egyptian. “Let none of you treat his brother in a way he himself would dislike to be treated.” —Mohammedan. "The true rule in life is to guard and do by the things of others as they would do by their own.” —Hindu. “The law imprinted on the hearts of men is to love the members of society as them- selves.” —Roman. DANCE MUSIC. “Then merrii/, merrily went their tabor, and nimbly went their toes.” 11.1 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS. 11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE MONDAY. 2nd APRIL, 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. MIDDAY CONCERT SESSION. 12.1 p.m. to 1.54 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House, 252 Collins Street (by exclusive permission of Wills and Paton Ltd.), on the Brunswick Panatrope. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL DANCE CONCERT. Sport. During the afternoons the results of the Ascot Ponies together with other infor- mation will be given immediately each race is run. 2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. A half-hour Dance Session of the latest popular dance hits 'by Melbourne’s favorite Dance Band. Each one announced prior to its presentation. 2.30 p.m. —Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “From Stage to Stage” (Fetras). “Nocturne (Chopin). 2.48 p.m. —Miss Frances Dillon, soprano: “Go not happy day” (Bridge). “Still Unexprest” (C. Jacobs-Bond). “If no one ever marries me” (Liza Leh- mann). 2.56 p.m. —Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Selection, “Maid of the Mountains” (Fraser- Simson). “Loves Enchantment” (Varley). 3.11 p.m. —Mr. Ernie Pettifer, saxophone: “Valse Brilliant” (Doer). 3.15 p.m. —Miss Frances Dillon, soprano: “Loves a Merchant” (Molly Carew). “What a wonderful world it would be” (Lohr). 3.22 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians : Fox trot, “Magic Voices of the Night” (Gus- man). Fox trot, “Love Baby” (Greer). Waltz, “Russian Lullaby” (Berlin). 3.30 p.m. —Interval announcements. 3.40 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra. 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second Weather forecast. 4.3 p.m.—Mr. Charles Duncan, baritone: “Roadways” Lohr). “The Little Irish Girl” (Lohr). 4.10 p.m. —Ayarz Dansonians. 4.26 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg, flute: “Humoreske” (Nahocker).


LOOK at our Easy Terms, aren’t they a bargain? Why cart your battery every week to a charging station, pay two shillings, and take a risk whether your battery is charged or discharged. About your “R” Battery, too? Your dry one doesn’t last long, and after a month or so distortion begins to come in; why not a wet rechargeable “R” Battery or an eliminator? They are the most economical in the long run, and you always have good reception. We can supply anything from £2 upwards on the Easiest Terms obtainable in Sydney. Keep Down Your Battery Troubles and Enjoy the Full Benefits of Radio. Cash Price. £ s. d. Colmovox “A” Charger 5 10 0 Colmovox “A” and “B” Charger 6 10 0 Philips’ Power Plus “B” Eliminator, 3002 9 15 0 Philips Power Plus “B” and “C” Elimina- tor, 3003 11 15 0 Philips’ Type 372 8 15 0 Emmco “B” Eliminator 10 10 0 Emmco Super Eliminator 12 12 0 Philco 83X Wet Battery 8 15 0 Three Star Wet Battery, 80. Volt 5 10 0 R.C.A. Speaker, 100 A 10 10 0 Amplion A.C., 7 Cone 7 15 0 Philips’ Trickle Charger 3 10 0 5 Months’ Terms. (19 weekly repayments.) Dep. 11/-; Weekly 5/6. Dep. 13/-; Weekly 6/6. Dep. 19/6; Weekly 9/9. Dep. 23/6; Weekly 11/9. Dep. 17/6; Weekly 8/9. Dep. 21/-; Weekly 10/6. Dep. 26/-; Weekly 12/7. Dep. 17/6; Weekly 8/9. Dep. 11/-; Weekly 5/6. Dep. 21/-; Weekly 10/6. Dep. 15/6; Weekly 7/9. Dep. 7/-; Weekly 3/6. 12 Months’ Terms. (52 weekly repayments.) Dep. 11/-; Weekly 2/2 Dep. 13/-; Weekly 2/6 Dep. 19/6; Weekly 3/9 Dep. 23/6; Weekly 4/6 ' Dep. 17/6; Weekly 3/4 Dep. 21/-; Weekly 4/- Dep. 20/-; Weekly 4/10 Dep. 17/6; Weekly 3/4 Dep. 11/-; Weekly 2/2 Dep. 21/-; Weekly 4/- Dep. 15/6; Weekly 3/- These and any other parts may be purchased on our Easy Payment System. COUNTRY CUSTOMERS are limited to terms over 5 months only. Below is a List of Parts for Building the QUALITY six £ s. d. 1 Panel, 24 x 8 x 3-16, Bakelite, 12/-; Delecto 1 0 0 1 Sub-panel, 23 x B.x 3-16, Bakelite ... 0 11 6 2 S.L.F. Condensers, Advance, 10/6 ea. 1 1 0 2 Vernier Dials, Emmco, 7/6 each 0 15 0 1 Knob, with Engraved Arrow 0 1 0 1 Electrad Battery Switch 0 2 0 1 Single Circuit Jack 0 1 7 1 Pair Benjamin Brackets 0 4 6 6 Benjamin UX Sockets, 4/6 each 1 7 0 4 Amperites, £l/7/-, or Brachstats ... 0 19 0 £ s. d. Metal Thread Screws, N.P., iin., fin., 1 .0001 Igranic Condenser 6 2 0 1 .00025 Electrad Cond., with Clips .. 0 3 0 2 2 .meg. Leak, Electrad 0 4 0 1 .601 Igranic Condenser 0 2 0 3 .006 Igranic Fixed Condenser 0 7 6 3 Electrad Metallised .1 Resistance .... 0 10 6 3 Electrad Metallised .25 Resistance .. 0 10 6 7 Pairs Grid Leak Clips 0 2 7 Bus Bar, Square or Round, per doz. .. 0 0 10 Glazite 10ft. Coil 0 1 0 Colville Moore Wireless Supplies Ltd. 10 Rowe Street (next Hotel Australia) SYDNEY Phone, 82261


4.30 p.m.—Mr. Charles Duncan, baritone: “Prologue” from Pagliacci (Leoncavallo). “Route Marchin” (Stock). 4.38 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Three African Dances” (Ring). “Summer Days” (Coates). 4.50 p.m.—To-night’s Entertainment. 4.55 p.m.—Special Racing report; acceptances and Barrier positions for the Sunbury Races by “Daybreak.” 5 p m. —G.P.O. Clock says “Five.” God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. €.30 p.m.—3Aß’s Cousin Peter. EVENING SESSION. Concert by the Aberfeldie Male Choir. 7.15 p.m.—Book session. Mr. Alfred Firman, Chief Librarian of Mullen’s presents rapid reviews of yesterday, to-day and to-morrow. 7.25 p.m.—Hobby Session. Mr. W .S. Corfield, of Harringtons will speak on “Photography for Beginners.” 7-35 p.m.—Sport session. “Harlequin” presents his budget of up-to-date news and comments on Sport of the day. , 7.50 p.m.—Macnamara's Stock reports. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Safety Talk* by Mr. Horace Book, Secretary of the National Safety Council of Australia. 8.15 p.m.—Choir. Part Song: “Viking Song” (Taylor). Mrs. Wensor, soprano: “Love, here is my heart” (Lao S&lesu). Mr. W. D. Loughlin, tenor: “Trooper Johnny Ludlow” (Temple). Mr. H. Wensor and Mrs. H. Wensor: Duet. “The Voyager” (Sanderson). Mr. John Walsh humorous: “Mary Ann” (Leigh). Mr. H. R. Phillips, baritone: “Song and a dream” (Cadman). Choir, Part Song: “Doan ye cry ma honey” (Albert W. Noll). Mr. E. J. Tupper, recitation: “On Our Selection” (Steel Rudd). Mrs. F. Penny, contralto: “My Laddie” (Phayer). Mr. Arthur Carter and Mr. John Walsh: Duet, “Larboard 'Watch” (Williams). Mr. W. D. Loughlin, tenor: “Mate O’ Mine” (Elliott). Choir, Part song: "Martyr’s of the Area” (L. de Rille). Mrs. H. Wensor, soprano: “Fy the Waters of Minnetonka” (Thurlow-Lieurance). Mr. E. W. Sleep. Mr. J. Walsh, Mr. A. Carter, and Mr. F'. Hughes: Quartet: “The Chapel” (Kreutzer). Mr. Hector Wensor, tenor: “For You Alone” (Geehl). Mr. and Mrs. F. Penny: Duet: “I Don't Suppose” (Trotere). Mr. Frank Hughes, bass: “The Company Sergeant-Major” (Sanderson). Choir.—Part Song: “Rose of My Heart” (Herman Lohr). Mr. E. J. Tupper, recitation: “That There Dog o’ Mine” (Henry Lawson). Mr. J. W. Pounder, tenor: “Sleep o’ the Roses” (Arthur Tate). Mr. Frank Hughes and Mr. E. W. Sleep: Duet: “The Battle Eve” (Theo. Bonheur.. Mr. John Walsh, humorous: “Wire in. My Lads” (F. W. Leigh). Choir.—Part Song: “In Absence” (Dudley Buck). Mrs. F. Penny, contralto: “Like to the Damask Rose” (E. Elgar). Mr. Frank Penny, baritone: “Along the Dusty Road” (Teschermacher). Mr. H. Wensor and Mrs. H. Wensor: Duet: “In the Garden of My Heart” (Ball). Mr. H. R. Phillips, baritone: “Little Town in the Old Country Down” (Sanderson). Choir. —Part Song: “The Sword of Farrara” (Bullard). 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin” : Sport results. 10.52 p.m,—“Age” News Bulletin, exclusive to 3AR. 10.58 p.m.—Final weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good-night quote is taken from the poem, "The Years mat the Locust,” by Mary Gilmour. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eleven.” God Save the King. 4QG, BRISBANE MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. MIDDAY SESSION. 1 p.m.—Market reports ; iveatner information ; “The Daily Mail - ’ and “The Daily Standard’ news. 1.30 p.m.—Lunch hour music. 1.58 p.m.—Stanuard time signal. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Mail train running times. 3.31 p.m.—A programme ot music from the Studio. 4.15 p.m.—“The Telegraph” news; weather news. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Mail train running times; “Daily Standard” news; weather information; an- nouncements. 6.10 p.m.—A French Talk—the ninth of a series—“ Practical Hints on Articulation.” Story, "Vie e Saint Vincent de Paul,” by Dr. E. A. D’Egerley. 6.30 p.m.—Bedtime stories by “The Sand- man.” 7 p.m.—Special news service; market re- ports ; stock reports. 7.30 p.m.—Weather news; announcements. 7.43 p.m.—Standard time signal. 7.48 p.m.—“Propagation of Plants,” by Mr. G. Williams (Acting Director of Fruit Cul- ture), NIGHT SESSION. 9 p.m.—From St. Andrew’s Church of Eng- land, South Brisbane— The Sacred Cantata “Olivet to Calver- rendered by the Choir of St. Andrew’s Church of England, South relayed from the church. PART lI.—STUDIO CONCERT. 9 p.m.—Metropolitan weather forecast. Overture—-“ Cavalier” (RollimFßi) : The Clarwin Orchestra (conductor, Mr. S. Henry). Soprano Solo, “Blackbirds’ Song” (Cyril Scott), Miss Rene Mars&?m_ Instrumental Dnet. “friendship” (Lafon). The Clarwin Duo. Tenor Solos— (a) “Lay My Head Beneath a Rose” (Fal- kenstein). (b) “At Dawning” (Cadman). Mr. S. P. Bacon. Selection—“ Gems of Maritana” (Wallace). The Clarwin Orchestra. Soprano Solo—“ The Little Damozel” (Novello). Miss Rene Marsden. March —“Monitor” (Allen), The Clarin Orchestra. 10 p.m.—“The Daily Mail” news ; weather news. Close down. SCL, ADELAIDE MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon. —G.P.O. Chimes. 12.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service and Bri- tish Wireless news. 12.30 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio “Recreator.” 12.50 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co’s. Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 12.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 1 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 1.1 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio “Re<s- - 1.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 3.1 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 3.30 p.m.—Menu talk by “Homelover.” 3.45 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio “Recreator.” 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 4.1 p.m.—Station announcements. 4.d0 p.m.—Musical numbers on the Studio “Recreator.” 4.57 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Entertainment for children by Kiddytime artists. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner Music on the Studio “Rec- reator” —A recital of Symphony Orchestra selections. 6.50 p.m.—General market reports by A. W. Sandford and Co., A. E. Hall and Co., Dal- gety and Co., S.A. Farmers Co-operative Union, Taylor Bros., Retail Grocers Associa- tion, Interstate Fruit and produce Market Co., Ltd. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—Stock Exchange Intelligence by S. C. Ward and Co. 7.7 p.m.—Scripture reading. 7.15 p.m.—Talk arranged by Aborigines Pro- tection League. 7.40 p.m.—Entertainment for the SCL Boys Club. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Overture, Studio Orchestra. 8.10 p.m.—Comedy, Wm. Runge. 8.20 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 8.30 p.m.—Vocal recital by Margery Walsh, soprano. 8.40 p.m.—Comedy, Wm. Runge. 8.48 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 8.55 p.m.—Bass solo, Frank Charlton. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 9.1 p.m.—Meteorological information. 9.2 p.m.—Dalgety’s wheat report. 9.3 p.m.—Station Announcements. 9.5 p.m.—British Wireless News. 9.12 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 9.20 p.m.—Bass solo, F.rank Charlton. 9.24 p.m.—Comedy, Wm. Runge. 9.30 p.m.—Selection, Studio Orchestra. 9.40 p.m.—Bass solo 6, Frank Charlton. 9.45 p.m.—Selections, Studio Orchestra. 10.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service. 10.15 p.m.—Relay from the Maison de Danse Glenelg—Dance Music. 10.55 p.m.—Tuesday’s programme and meteo- rological information. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH. MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 12.30 p.m.—Tune in. 12.35 p.m.—Markets, News, and Cables. 1 p.m.—Time signal. 1.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. 1.2 p.m.—Lunch hour music. Brunswick Panatrope Hour relayed from Messrs. Musgrove’s Limited, Concert Hall, Murray Street. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Tune in. 3.35 p.m.—Afternoon Tea Concert relayed from the Carlton Cafe, Hay street. Vocal interludes from the Studio. 4.30 p.m.—Close down.


Mode! "C” 0 Model "AT c lhe^o nderful XL VARIQ -DENSERS at Murdoch's TO be first in presenting the newest achievements in the Radio Science is the special aim of Murdoch’s alert and highly-specialised Radio Service. For the first time, Murdoch’s introduce to amateurs and Experimenters the remarkable and interesting X.L. Vario-Densers. Read all about them! X.L. VARIO DENSERS FOR ALL CAPACITIES. Designed primarily for use where accurate values or adjustments are required. Genuine Bakelite casing—dust and moisture proof, phosphor-bronze nickel-plated metal parts—materials and construc- tion of supreme excellence. Extreme micrometer advance, broad and positive capacity range adjust- ment and exceptional accessibility in close quarters are exclusive features. MODEL N. Has variable capacity, adjustable from 1.8 to 20 micro-microfarads, which is .0000018 to .00002 microfarads. Price, each MODEL G. Made in three variable capacity ranges, Model Gl, .00002 to .0001 mfd.; model G 5, .0001 to .0005 mfd.; model G 10, .0003 to .001 mfd. Complete with grid leak clips. Price, each 5/6 8/6 TO SHORT WAVE ENTHUSIASTS. Karas Orthometric Condensers of immutable quality and efficiency. Murdoch’s have sufficient stocks to meet the heavy demand. /Q .00014 and .00025, each The Improved Bremmer-Tully Short Wave Coil Kit, complete with special socket ready /f' connected to coils, each kJZJIxj Have you got your copy of Murdoch’s Special Circuit and Wiring diagram of the Two-Valve Short Wave Set? Send or write NOW —It’s FREE ! Freight paid on all Radio Goods, including Batteries up to 5-lbs. in weight, to nearest Post Office, Railway Station, or Port. in Park Street Ltd. Sydney “Specialists in all Radio Requisites. EVENING SESSION. 6.45 p.m.—Tune in. The evening transmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 6.50 p.m.—Stories for the Kiddies by Uncles Henry, Bertie and Duffy. 7.20 p.m—Stocks, Markets, news. 7.45 p.m.—Talk by Lieut. Col. Le Souef, Direc- tor of the Zoological Gardens, South Perth. 8 p.m.—Time signal. 8.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Meteo- rological Bureau of Western Australia. Station announcements such as alterations to programmes, etc. 8.3 p.m.—Band Night. Concert by the R.S.L. Band, conducted by Mr. W. A. Halvorsen, relayed from the R.S.L. Institute, Perth. 10 p.m.—Late News items by courtsey of “The Daily News” Newspaper Co, Ships within range announcement. Weather report and forecast. 10.30 p.m.—Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5 metres of Programme given on 1250 metres, commen- cing at 6.45 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART MONDAY, 2nd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.—Musical selection. 3.5 p.m.—Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. Weather information. Items of interest. 3.15 p.m.—Musical selections by 7ZL Studio Trio: “Marche des Cadets” (Bonnet). “If Winter Comes” (Tennant). “Norwegian Dance” (Mullen). Violin Solo. Selected. Mr. E. J. McCann. Suite, “Lavender and Lace” (Hill). “Selections from To-nights the Night” (Rubens). Pianoforte solo, Mr. A. Roberts. "Danse Debonnaire” (Willeby). “Largo” (Handel). “Caro Mio Ben” (Giordani). 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Funny Man talks to the children. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Musical selection. 7.35 p.m.—Cooking Talk by Regulo. 7.50 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Railway auction produce sales. Weather forecasts. Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 8.1 p.m.—Concert by Derwent Concert Band Conductor, Mr. T. W. Hopkins. 9.40 p.m.—British Official Wireless news. 9.50 p.m.—Mercury special Interstate news ser- vice. Ships within wireless range. Tasmanian District weather reports. 9 p.m. weather forecasts. Weather reports from Australian Capital cities. Station announcements. Tues- day’s programme. 10 p.m.—Close down. Tuesday, April 3 2FC, SYDNEY EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7 a_m. to 8 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10 a.m. —“Big Ben” and announcements. 10.5 a.m. —Studio music.


10.15 a.m. —“Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 10.30 a.m. —Studio music. 10.35 a.m. —Last minute racing information by the 2FC commissioner. 10.45 a.m. —Studio music. 11 a.m. —“Big Ben” and studio music. 11.5 a.m. —A.P.A. talk and Reuter’s cable ser- vices. 11.15 a.m.—A talk on home cooking and recipes by Miss Ruth Furst. 11.30 a.m. —Close down. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben” and announcements. 12.2 p.m.—Stock Exchange, first call. 12.3 p.m.—Official weather forecast. Rainfall. 12.5 p.m.—Studio music. 12.10 p.m.—Summary of “Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 12.15 p.m.—Rugby wireless news. 12.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Weather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news ser- service. Producers’ Distributing Society’s re- port. 1.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange, second call. 1.30 p.m.—Studio music. Lorraine Jarman, so- prano. 1.35 p.m.—Studio music. 1.55 p.m.—Lorraine Jarman, soprano. 2 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. S p.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements. 8.5 p.m.—Ruby Lesley, mezzo-soprano: “Thang God for a garden” (Del Riego). 8.10 p.m.—Maysio Reid, pianforte solo (pupil of Ramsay Pennycuick): "Prelude in D.” 3.15 p.m.—A talk on Moore Park, by G. J. Lockley. 8.30 p.m.—Nita Lee, soubrette: “A Shady Tree” (Donaldson). 8.35 p.m.—Esther Herford, soprano. 3.40 p.m.—Popular records. 8.56 p.m.—Ruby Lesley, mezzo-soprano: “Just Love Me.” 4 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Maysie Reid, pianoforte solo (pupil of Ram- say Pennycuick), “Minuetto” (Zanella). 4.5 p.m.—Nita Lee, soubrettet “Dance with the Guy” (Archer). 4.10 p.m.—Popular records. 4.20 p.m.—Esther Herford, soprano. 4.25 p.m.—Maysie Reid, pianoforte solo: “Scherzo in B Flat Minor” (Chopin). 4.35 p.m.—Studio music. 4.45 p.m.—Stock Exchange, third call. 4.47 p.m.—Studio music and results of the cricket match played in New Zealand to- day. Australia versus Otago North. 5 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The chimes of 2FC. 6.45 p.m.—The “Hello Man” talks to the chil- dren. 6.15 p.m.—Story time for the young folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music. 7 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Late sporting news. 7.10 p.m.—Dalgety’s market reports (wool, wheat and stocl^). 7.18 p.m.—Fruit and vegetable markets. P.D.S. poultry re£>arts. 7.22 p.m.—Weather ,axiQ shpping news. 7.25 p.m.—“Evening News” late news service. NIGHT SESSION. 7.40 p.m.—Announcing a night of comic opera items. 7.45 p.m.—A talk of comic opera memories. 8 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Peter Gawthorne, English baritone, who created many roles at the Gaiety Theatre, London. 8.10 p.m.—Olive Godwin, a well-known J. C. Williamson comic opera artist. 8.18 p.m.—Charlie Lawrence, entertainer: In patter and song. 8.28 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra, conduc- ted by Horace Keats, in selections from comic operas. 8.40 p.m.—Vinia De Loitte, will revive me- mories of comic operas: (a) “Alice Blue Gown,” from “Irene.” (b) “Daffodil Time,” from Belle of Brit- tany.” 8.50 p.m.—Andrew Higginson will sing Dan- iol’s song, “I’m going to Maximes,” the part he created in “The Merry Widow.” 9 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Late weather forecast. The 2FC Orchestra, conducted by Horace Keats: Gems from “The Quaker Girl.” 9.15 p.m.—Peter Gawthorne, baritone. 9.23 p.m.—The 2FC Orchestra: Selection from “The Geisha.” 9.35 p.m.—Olive Godwin, soprano. 9.43 p.m.—Vinia de Loitte and Charles Law- rence: “Two little sausages” from “Girls of Gothen- burg.” 9.50 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra, conducted by Horace Keats: Selection from “Our Miss Gibbs.” 10.5 p.m.—Andrew Higginson, baritone. 10.23 p.m.—Vinia de Loitte: Recollections of comic opera. 10.30 p.m.—Late weather forecast. 10.31 p.m.—From the Ambassadors: The Ambassadors’ Dance Orchestra, con- ducted by Al. Hammet. 10.57 p.m.—From the Studio: To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” The Ambassadors’ Dance Orchestra. 11.45 p.m.—National Anthem. Close down. 2BL, SYDNEY. TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m MORNING SESSION. During the day descriptions will be broad- cast from the Royal Agricultural Show. 10.30 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Musical programme from studio. 10.40 a.m.—News from the “Daily Telegraph Pictorial.” 10.50 a.m.—Musical programme from the studio. 11 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Women’s Session. Social Notes—Replies to correspondents. Talk on “Toilet Hints” by Mamselle Vit- kowska. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special Ocean Forecast and weather reports. 12.3 p.m.—Musical programme from the studio 12.11 p.m.—Boats in call by wireless. 12.13 p.m.—Fruit Market report. 12.15 p.m.—Vegetable Market report. 12.17 p.m.—London Metal Market report. 12.19 p.m.—Dairy Farm Produce Market report 12.22 p.m.—Forage Market Report. 12.24 pun.—Fish Market report. 12.26 p.m.—Rabbit Market report. 12.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 12.30 p.m.—H.M.V. Gramophone Recital. 1.27 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 1.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Talk to children and special entertainment for children in Hospital. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. Race results broadcast immediately after each race by courtesy of the “Sun.” 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. News from the “Sun.” 3.15 p.m.—Civil Service Stores Trio—direction —Miss De Courcey Bremer. 3.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. News from “Sun.” 3.40 p.m.—Pianoforte Recital from the studio 3.50 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Civil Service Stores Trio. 4.15 p.m.—Talk on “The Women of Ancient Rome.” 4.35 p.m.—Musical programme from the studio 4-50 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 4.55 p.m.—Features of evenings’ programme. 4.57 p.m.—Producers Distributing Society’s Poultry report. 4.59 p.m.—Racing resume. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. ffi 5.45 p.m.—rG.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. SPECIAL COUNTRY SESSION. & ; 30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Australian Mercantile Land and Finance Co.’s report. Weather Report and forecast by courtesy of Govt. Meteorologist. Producers Distributing Society’s Fruit and Vegetables Market Report. Stock Exchange Report N.R.M.A. Talk. 6.45 p.m.—Country news from the “Sun.” 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m.—Talk on “First Aid” by Mr. Wilkin- son, District Superintendent St. John Am- bulance[check spelling] Assoc. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Broadcasters Topical Chorus. 8.3 p.m.—Concert by the Dee Why District Choral Society assisted by: Miss Madge Clague, contralto. Mr. Frank Hutchens, pianist. Mr. Clement Q. Williams, baritone. Mr. Maynard Wilkinson, accompanist. 10.15 p.m.—Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. Weather report and forecast vy courtesy of Mr. C. J. Mares, Govt. Meteorologist. 10.20 p.m.—The Wentworth Cafe Orchestra under the direction of Mr. S. Simpson broad- cast from the Wentworth. During intervals between dances “Sun” news will be broadcast 11.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. National Anthem. ffi 2 UW, SYDNEY

TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.4 p.jn.—Where to Go. 7.10 p.m.—Dinner music. 7.20 p.m.—Vocal and Instrumental items. 7.30 p.m.—Mr. and Mrs. J. Campbell, steel guitar duet: Selected. 7.37 p.m.—Studio item. 7.45 p.m.—Mr. and Mrs. J. Campbell: Steel guitar duets. 7.52 p.m.—Studio items. 8 p.m.—News items. 8.10 p.m.—Mr. and Mrs. Campbell: Steel guitar duets. (a) Selected. (b) Selected. 8.20 p.m.—Gems of the Opera, arranged and presented by G. F. Manuel. 9.30 p.m.—Dance music. 9.58 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE. TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m.—Ditties for Daily Dozens. 7.30 a.m.—PHYSICAL CULTURE EXER- CISES (to music). 7.33 a.m.—WEATHER FORECAST for all States. Mails.


“ACME Socket Power eliminates worry of run-down batteries Modernize your Receiver ! “ ACME ” operates any set, with any valves, from your ordinary electric-light socket. Think what this means ! No “ B ” batteries to bother about; up to 180 volts—smooth direct current ; no hum, no distortion ! Improved tones due to the unlimited reserve power ; clearer, deeper and more natural reception. This elimin- ator will bring you a new appreciation of radio. It is economical too, for the first cost is practically the last. Price, £lO/15/- As a rectifier, the famous “ RAYTHEON ” Valve is employed. This tube, better known in U.S.A., is a synonym for simplicity, rugged construction, long life and general efficiency. It contains no filament, gives full-wave rectification and is easily replaced. Visit the Wireless Department and inspect this amazing accessory. GROUND FLOOR, NEW BUILDING FARMER’S Pitt, Market and George Streets 7.40 a.m.—News. 8 a.m.—MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY TIME SIGNAL. 8.1 a.m.—Ditties for Daily Dozens. 8.5 a.m.—News. Sporting information. Shipping. Stock Exchange fluctuations 8.15 a.m.—Ditties for Daily Dozens. 8.15 a.m.—Close down. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—3LO’S CULINARY COUNSELS or how to create creature comforts with a minimum of cash. VERE PUDDING. 6oz. flour, y» teaspoon c. soda 1 table spoon jam, '4oz. fat or butter, 3 tablespoons milk, 2oz. raisins or sultanas, 1 egg boz sugar, pinch salt. Method: (1) p ut sauce- pan of water on to boil to steam pudding (2) Grease pudding basin or tin. (3) Cream fat, or butter, and sugar with the hand (4) Add egg, beat well. (5) Add milk, then flour, soda and sr.lt. (6) Add jam and blend well. (7) Put into greased basin or tin, and cover with greased paper. Steam for l 1 hours, taking care that the water does not boil into ,he pudding. (8) Serve with jam sauce. 11.2 a.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN Keep yours well stocked with onions. Sow the seeds in an outdoor seed bed and trans- plant when the seedlings are large enough to handle conveniently, the best time being when they are about the thickness of a goose quill. Make deep drills, and lay the plants in these, drawing the soil over the roots with the rake, and treading same firmly. Be careful that only the roots and bulbous portion at the base of the stem are inserted in the soil, for if put in deeper the plants do not bulb freely. Allow about 15 inches between the drills and 4 to 5 inches between each plant. The ground must be kept well worked while the plants are growing, and hand weeding around the plants is essent al. Frequent watering and regular cultivation is the secret of growing onions successfully, and the ground holding the crop must be kept open, clean and free from weeds. 11.5 a.m.—Miss E NOBLE: “Baking Block Cake in a Gas Oven.” 11.20 a.m.—Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m.—Mrs. DOROTHY SILK: “Homecrafts.” 11.40 a.m. —Musical interlude. 11.45 a.m.—Under the auspices of the FREE KINDERGARTEN .UNION, Miss R. G. Harris, Publicity Officer, will speak on “The Work of the Free Kindergarten.” 12 noon.—MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY TIME SIGNAL. 12.1 p.m.—Australian Mines and Metals Asso- ciation, from thq London Stock Exchange this day. British Official Wireless news from Rugby, Reuter’s and The Australian Press Association Cables. “Argus” news service. MIDDAY SESSION, 12.20 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “Schumann Suite.” 12.30 p.m.—GERTRUDE HUTTON, contralto: “It Cannot Be” (Schumann). “Since Mine Eyes Have Seen Him” (Schumann), “The King” (Schumann). 12.37 p.m.—Stock Exchange information, 12.40 p.m.—DOROTHY ROXBURGH, Viola: “Abenlied” (Schumann), “Traumerei” (Schumann) 12.47 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE; “Schumann Sengs”—Part 1, 12.57 p.m.—Announcements. 1 p.m.—MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY TIME SIGNAL, 1.1 p.m.—J. HOWARD KING, baritone; “The Two Grenadiers” (Schumann), “Tears and Sighs” (Schumann), 1.8 p.m. —Meteorological information, Weather forecast and rainfall for Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, and New South Wales, River reports. Ocean forecasts.


1.15 p.m.—GERTRUDE HUTTON, contralto: “The Prayer’ (Hugo Wolfe). “Secrecy” (Hugo Wolfe). “The Gardener” (Hugo Wolfe). 1.22 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “Schumann’s Children’s Suite.” 1.32 p.m.—J. HOWARD KING, baritone; “I Will not Grieve” (Schumann). “The Month of May” (Schumann) 1.39 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN o QUARTETTE: “Schumann’s Songs"—Part 11. 1.45 p.m.—Under the auspices of the National Safety Council, T. O’L. REYNOLDS, Deputy Chairman of the Tramways Board, will speak on “Safety First.” 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.15 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Doctor Jazz” (Melrose). “Kiss and Make Up” (Miller). “Where is My Meyer” (Gibert). 2.24 p.m.—KATHLEEN ROCHFORT. soprano, (by permission of J. C. Williamson, Ltd.) : “Nymphs et Sylvans” (Bemberg). “Ye Banks and Braes.” 2.31 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Miilinberg Joys” (Morton). “Cross Your Heart” (Gensler). “Baby Feet Go Fitter Patter” (Kahn). 2.40 p.m.—ELLA RIDDELL, contralto: “To the Forest” (Tschaikowsky). “Fairings” (Easthope Martin). 2.47 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “I’ve Got Somebody Now” (Williams). “Bless Her Little Heart” (Dennicker). "Shanghai Dream Man’ (Davis). 2.56 p.m —FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet, “Hana Lei.” Steel Guitar. “Kalima Waltz.” Song, “Lay My Head Beneath the Rose." Duet, “Drifting and Dreaming." 1.8 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Just a Memory” (Henderson). “Persian Rosebud” (Leslie). “Love is Just a Little Bit of Heaven" (Bryan). 1.15 p.m.—ONE-ACT PLAY: “COLLABORATORS.” He MAURICE DUDLEY She MRS. MAURICE DUDLEY. 1.30 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “I’m Lonely Without You” (Warren). “My Blue Heaven” (Donaldson). “Just Around the Corner” (Hayes). 1.39 p.m.—KATHLEEN ROCHFORT. soprano: “Hush-a-bye-birdie” (Scotch). “The Empty Nest” (Mason). 1.46 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Sweet Yvette” (Davis). “C’est Voua” (Slver). 1.53 p.m.—THE PERIPATETIC POOR PER- SON will now give—- A few old songs by the wayside. 4.2 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “A Shady Tree” (Donaldson). “I wonder how I look when I’m asleep” (Brown). “Put your arms where they belong” (Davis) 4.11 p.m.—THE FOUR COLORED EMPER- ORS OF HARMONY: “Heaven.” “Wicked Race.” “Swanee River.” “Done what you * told me to do f*' 4.23 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Keep a Little Sunshine in Yonr Heart" (Von Tilger). “Chloe” (Moret). “Dance of the Tinker Toys” (Schobel). 4.82 p.m.—ELLA RIDDELL, contralto: “An Old Garden” (Temple). “The Lotus Flower” (Schumann). 4.89 p.m.-*-THE VAGABONDS: ‘ Me and My Shadow” (Jolson). “A Night in June” (Friend). ‘Slow River” (Myers). 4.48 p.m.—Weather , report from Adelaide. Weather report from Mildura district. 4.49 p.m. —Two more old songs before THE PERIPATETIC POOR PERSON JOGS ON— "‘The Way to Your Heart” (Lockhart). “When I am Home Again” (Daniel Wood). 4.56 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “How long must I Wait for you ?" (Stillwell). “Wondering Why” (Malie). “Night time is love time” (Davis). 5 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Stock Exchange information. 5.15 p.m.—Close down. Results of Benalla Races will be given as they come to hand. EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings by “BILLY BUNNY.” G. 25 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6.30 p.m.—COLONEL J. W. M. CARROLL will talk on: “Cats.” 6.45 p.m.—Monsieur Sonora. 6.50 p.m.—“BILLY BUNNY” : “Stories of the Australian Bush." NEWS AND MARKET REPORTS. 7.7 p.m.—Rowing Notes by T. L. Mannix, honorary general secretary, Victorian Row- ing Association. Official report of Newmarket Stock sales by The Associated Stock and Station Agents, Bourke-street, MelDourne. 7.10 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Weather synopsis. Shipping movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 7.17 p.m.—Fish market reports by J. K. Borrett Ltd., Rabbit Prices. 7.19 p.m.—River reports. 7.21 p.m.—Market reports by the Victorian Producers’ Co-Operative Co., Ltd., Poultry grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy produce, onions and potatoes. Market reports of fruit by the Victorian Fruitgrowers’ Associa- tion. Retail prices. Wholesale prices of fruit by the Wholesale Fruit Merchants’ Association. Citrus fruits. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Under the Auspices of the Town Planning Association, F. E. DIXON, will speak on, “Town Planning and Land Values.” 7.45 p.m.—Under the Auspices of UNI- VERSITY EXTENSION BOA#ID, PRO- FESSOR D. B. COPLAND. M.A., D.Sc., Professor of Economics, at the University, will speak on, “Marketing Primary Products.*' THE SHRINE OF REMEMBRANCE. 8 p.m.—Every citizen of Victoria should feel proud to contribute towards the erection of the “Shrine” of Remembrance.” On the one hand it will denote the last tribute paid by an ever grateful country to those who counted death as nothing compered to the preservation of that liberty and freedom the achievement of which has meant so much to the development of our race. On the other hand it will connote our humble thanks to God for that preservation whereby our country and our children have been spared a closer acquaintance with the ravages and horrors of war. Major-General H. E. Elliott. Acceptances for Sandown Races. 8.1 p.m.—FRANK E. BEAUREPAIRE, will speak on: “Long Distance Swimming." 8.15 p.m.—Birthday greeting and programme announcements. A WEST COUNTRY PROGRAMME. 8.16 p.m—PRAHRAN CITY BAND: Selection, “The Pirates of Penzance.” 8.26 p.m.—THE HARMONISTS’ MALE QUARTETTE: “Oh, who will o’er the Downs so free" (R. L. de Pearsell). “King Arthur” —Traditional, arr. (Robert- son). 8.33 p.m.—PRAHRAN CITY BAND•, Hymn, “While Shepherds Watched.” 8.38 p.m.—A. E. J. QUICK, President of the Devon, Cornwall, and Somerset Association of Victoria, will speak on: “’Cornwall and its people.” 8.53 p.m.—THE HARMONISTS’ MALE QUARTETTE: Solo and Chorus. JAMES SCOTT, “The Cornish Floral Dance" (Katie Moss). Solo: HORACE WHITE: “Up from Somerset” (Sanderson). 9 p.m.—PRAHRAN CITY BAND: Patrol: “The Cornish Carnival.” 9.10 p.m.—THE HARMONISTS’ MALE QUARTETTE: Solo and Chorus. TOM MASTERS, “Red Devon by the Sea." (Coningsby Clarke). Solo, J. A. FRASER: “Glorious Devon” (Edward German). 9.17 p.m.—THE CRUCIFIXION—A MEDITA- TION-SACRED PASSION OF THE HOLY REDEEMER. Written Rev. W. J. Spar- row-Simpson, M.A., the Music by (J. Stainer). By SCOTS CHURCH CHOIR. MANSLEY GREER, Organist and Director. Soprano, ANNIE CADDELL. Contralto, Madame GREGOR WOOD. Tenor, COLIN THOMPSON. Baritone, GORDON PEART. Bass, LESLIE PAULL. RECITATIVE, tenor —“And they came to a place named Gethsemane.” THE AGONY, solo, bass: “Could Ye Not Watch With Me One Brief Hour?” Chorus, “Jesu, Lord Jesu, Bowed in Bitter Anguish." Solo, “Could Ye Not Watch with Me One Brief Hour?" Recitative, tenor and bass: “And they laid their hands on Him and took him.” Processional to Calvary, Chorus: “Fling Wide the Gates, for the Saviour Waits." Solo, tenor: “How Sweet is the Grace of His Sacred Face ” Chorus, “Then On to the End, My God and My Friend.” Recitative, bass: “And when they had come to the place called Calvary.” Hymn, “The Mystery of the Divine Humilia- tion."

  • Recitative, bass, “He mr.de Himself of no

reputation.” Solo, tenor: “The Majesty of the Divine Humiliation." Recitative, bassl ‘“And as Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up.” Quartette: “God So Loved the World.” Hymn, "Litany of the Passion.” Recitative, tenor and Chorus: “Jesus said, Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” Duet, tenor and bass: "So Thou Liftest Thy Divine Petition.” Hymn, “The Mystery of Intercession.” Recitative, tenor, bass and Chorus: “And one of the malefactors which were hanged, railed on Him, saying, “If Thou be the Christ, Save Thyself and Us.” Hymn, “The Adoration of the Crucified.” Recitative, tenor, bass and chorus: “When Jesus therefore saw His mother, and the disciple standing by, whom He loved, He saith unto His mother, “Woman, behold thy son.” Recitative, bass: "Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by?” Chorus, “The Appeal of the Crucified." Recitative tenor and Chorus: “After th!i Jesus, knowing that all things were now accomplished, saith, “I thirst.” Hymn, “For the Love of Jesus.” PLANTATION JY£ELODIESw 10.24 p.m.—Weather reports. 10.25 p.rr.—STATION ORCHESTRA: “Reminiscences of the Plantation" ( Chambers). 10.32 p.m.—THE FOUR COLORED EM- PERORS OF HARMONY: “Get on Board.” “Carry Me Back to Qld Virginny.” “Steal Away.” t “Swing Low.” 10.44 p.m.—FRANK and FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet, “Dreamy Hawaii.” Song, “Knu Home.” Steel Guitar, “Hula Blues.” Duet, “My Blue Heaven.”


Price Complete The tendency in radio to-day is to simplify the operation of a receiving set by reducing its number of controls. In the“D.J. Standard 5” 1928 Model you have a one-dial control set. Easy to operate, and receives true and clear. It has been specially designed and manufactured in our own factory. We fully guarantee it. A five-valve receiver built entirely of Australian materials. Encased in highly polished cabinet. Size 24 x 141 x 9 inches. Set Complete, £35 There is also a “D.J. Standard 4” 1928 Model Receiving Set. Another of our own produc- tions. Guaranteed by us. Just as easy to operate, and receives true and clear. Size 24 x 141 x 9 ins. Price Set Complete, £27/10/- Radio Dept n Lower Ground Floor Castlereagh , Market & FAizabeth Streets LATE NEWS SESSION. 10.54 p.m.—“Argus”, news service. Meteoro. logical information. Sporting notes by “Olympus.” the ROYAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF VICTORIA’S SAFETY MES SAGE FOR TO-DAY IS: “Learn to respect sand roads. If you expect to turn out for any reason, start a considerable distance back of the point where you wish to be out of the road.” 11 p.m.-OUR GREAT THOUGHT t “Let me come home at night, Ciear-eyed and unashamed, Still clinging to the right, My record undefamed. Let not my conscience see The marks of shame on me ” DANCE MUSIC. 11.1 p.m.-THE VAGABONDS- -11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. MIDDAY CONCERT SESSION. 12 noon to 1 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House, 252 Collins Street (by exclusive permission of Wills and Paton, Ltd.), on the Brunswick Panatrope. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL DANCE CONCERT. 2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians : A half-hour Dance Session, by Melbourne’s favorite Dance Band. All the latest popualr hits, each one announced prior to its pre- sentation. 2.30 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestras “L’Arlesienne,” Part 1 (Bizet). 2.46 p.m.—Miss Jessie Shmith. contralto: “The Auld West” (Traditional). “Annie Laurie” (Traditional). 2.53 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : Selection: “Rose Marie” (Friml). “Valse Suite” (Brahms). 3.8 p.m.—Miss Jessie Shmith. contralto: “Ashes of Roses” (Woodman). “The Owl” (Wells). 3.16 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 3.30 p.m.—lnterval announcements. 3.35 p.m.—“Madamoiselle Jeunesse.” Interval talk on Timely Topics of Interest to our Lady Listeners. 3.45 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Where Nile Waters Plow” (Paul Andre). Selection: “On With the Show” (Nicholls). 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second weather forecast. 4.3 p.m.—Mr. Robert Allen, alto: “A Song of Hope” (Wood). "Ma’ Little Banjo” (Dichmont). 4.10 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 4.19 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Spanish Dance” (Sarasate). “Dainty Damsel.” 4.27 p.m.—Mr. Robert Allen, alto : “I Know of Two Bright Eyes” (Clutsam). “An Emblem” (Thompson). 4.35 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Ballet Music” from Rosamunde (Schubert). Selection: “Canary Cottage” (Carroll). 4.55 p.m.—Announcements. To-night’s enter- tainment . 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Five.” God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Mac.’s Entertainment. EVENING SESSION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. 7.10 p.m.—Dr. Floyd, organist and choirmaster at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Melbourne, will talk on “The Art of Listening.” 7.30 p.m.—A broad-minded and up-to-date short talk by “Friar Tuck”: “Ideals.”


7.35 p.m.—Sport Session. “Harlequin” pre- sents his budget of up-to-date news and com- ments on Sport of the Day. 7.50 p.m.—Macnamara’s Stock Report. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Overture: “Peter Schmoll” (Weber) ._ 8.12 p.m.—Miss Ethel Brearley, soprano*: “Elegie” (Massenet). “The Winds are Calling” (Landon Ronald). 8.20 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 8.36 p.m.—Miss Ethel Brearley, piano: “Vasle Caprice” (Spindler). 8.40 p.m.—Miss Ethel Heaney, v soprano: “Over the Steppe” (Gretchaninoff). “The Wind Song” (Rogers). 8.48 p.m.—Announcements. 9 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “From the Highlands” (Langey). 9.15 p.m.—Mr. Robert Adams, trumpet: “Berceuse de Jocelyn” (Ar. Tobani). 9.19 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 6 29 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results- -9.38 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : Suite: “Viva la Dance” (Finck). 0.49 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Ten.** 10.1 p.m.—Semi-final weather forecast, speci- ally for our country listeners. 10.3 p.m.—Mr. Alan Eddy, bass baritone* “Cradle Song” (Kreialer). “All Through the Night” (Old Welsh). 10.11 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Suite: “Cyrano de Bergerac”. (Rosse). "La Baiser d’Eunice” (Nouges). 10.26 p.m.—Mr. Alan Eddy, bass baritone: “Song of the Volga Boatmen” (Chaliapine-Koeneman). “Oh. That We Two Were Maying” (Nevln). 10.34 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. “Half a Moon” (Hanley). “Pretending”” (Deagon). “My Blue Heaven” (Donaldson). “So Blue” (Henderson). 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sport results • 10 52 p.m.—“Age” News Bulletin, exclusive to 3AR. 10.58 p.m.—Final weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good-night quote is taken from the poem. "Finis Exoptatus,” by Adam Lindsay Gordon. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eleven." God Save the King. 4QG, BRISBANE TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. MIDDAY SESSION. 1 p.m.—Market reports ; weather information ; “The Daily Mail” and “The Daily Standard” news. U 0 p.m.—Lunch hour music. 1.58 p.m.—Standard time signal. 2 p.m.—Cloae down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Mail train running times. 3.31 p.m.—Afternoon tea music. 4.15 p.m.—“The Telegraph” new 3. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Mail train running times; “Daily Standard” news ; announcements. 6.15 p.m.—Dinner music. 6.30 p.m.—The Children’s Session: Stories by “The SandmanT* 7 p.m. —Special news service; market reports; atock reports. 7.30 p.m.—Weather news ; announcements. 7.43 p.m.—Standard time signal. 7.45 p.m.—Lecturette: A talk on “Photo- graphy” by Mr. F. L. South (Kodak’s). NIGHT SESSION. The Rundamba Methodist Anniversary Con- cert will be relayed direct from the Methodist School Hall. 8 p.m.—Hymn—Sung by the Children’s Choir. Solo (selected) —Mrs. E. M. Edwards). Recitation— “ The Small Boy at the Dime Museum,” Mr. A. C. Fletcher. Hymn—Sung by the Children’s Choir. Ray). Solo— “ The Land Beyond the Sunset” (Lilian Miss Maisie Reeve. Violin Solo— “Cavalleria Rusticana” (Mascagni, Mr. E. Duce. Hypin—Sung by the Children’s Choir. Solo (selected), Mr. G. Clark. Duet—“ When I Survey” (Jude). Mrs. L. Clegg and Miss C. E. Hardie. Solo —“Happy Summer Song” (Kahn>, Miss E. Stephens. Monologue—" Rosie’s Relations” (Heckman), Miss M. Bourke. Hymn—Sung by the Children’s hCoir. Solo —“In an Old-Fashioned Town” (Squire). Mr. Reg. Hardie. Concertina Solo—Mr. W. Collins. Solo —“A Hundred Fathoms Deep” (Shat- tuck), Mr. E. HalliweU. Hymn—Sung by the Children’s Choir. Solo—“ Slave Song” (Del Riego), Miss M. Logan. Recitation (selected) Mr. A. C. Fletcher. Solo —“Laugh and Sing” Drummond), Mrs. A. Statham. Hymn—Sung by the Children’s Chior. 10 p.m.—“The Daily Mail” news; weather news; close down. SCL, ADELAIDE. TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Chimes. 12.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service and Bri- tish Wireless Press. 12.30 p.m.—Dance selections on the Studio “Recreator." 12.50 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 12.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 1 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 1.1 p.m.—Vocal numbers on the “Recreator.” 1.20 p.m.—Symphony Orchestral numbers on the “Recreator.” 1.40 p.m.—Miscellaneous numbers on the studio “Recreator.” 1.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Selection of Orchestral selections on “Recreator.”. 3.30 p.m.—Vocal recital on “Recreator.” 3.45 p.m.—Educational address by Rev. G. E. Hale B.A. 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 4.1 p.m.—Organ recital. 4.30 p.m.—Selection of dance numbers on the “Recreator.” 4.57 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Children’s entertainment with the SCL Radio Family. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner Music on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 6.50 p.m.—General Market reports. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—Stock Exchange Intelligence by S. C. Ward and Co. 7.7 p.m.—Scripture Reading. 7.15 p.m.—Extracts from News Bulletin. 7.25 p.m.—Gardening talk by Lasscocks Nur- series, Lockleys. 7.40 p.m.—The “Bird Lady” will address the SCL Girls Club. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Relayed from St. Peters Cathedral, a rendition of the oratorio “Olivet to Cal- vary” by the Cathedral Choir conducted by J. M. Dunn. 9.30 p.m. (Aprox).—Meteorological informa- tion. 9.31 p.m.—British Wireless news. 9.40 p.m.—Dalgety’s wheat report. 9.45 p.m.—Relayed from the Maison de Danse, Glenelg—Dance Music. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service. 10.12 p.m.—Shipping List. 10.15 p.m.—Maison de Danse relay continued. 10.55 p.m.—Wednesday’s programme and me- teorological information. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH. TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 12.30 p.m.—Tune in. 12.35 p.m.—Markets, News, and cables. 1 p.m.—Time signal. 1.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. 1.2 p.m.—Studio Instrumental Trio: “Coppelia Ballet” (Delibes). Selection, “Katja” (Gilbert). 1.30 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Tune in. 3.35 p.m.—Organ music relayed from the Grand Theatre, Murray street. Vocal interludes from the studio. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. 6.45 p.m.—Tune in. The evening transmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 6.50 p.m.—Stories for the Kiddies by Uncles Henry, Bertie and Duffy. 7.20 p.m.—Stocks, Markets, News. 7.45 p.m.—Talk. 8 p.m—.Time signal. 8.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. Station announcements such as alterations to programmes, etc. 8.3 p.m.—Concert Night. Musical programme from the studio, in- cluding vocal and instrumental artists: Orchestral music played by the Grand Sym- phony Orchestra, conducted by Mr. Val Smith, relayed from the Grand Theatre, Murray Street. 10 p.m.—Late News items by courtesy of ‘The Daily News” Newspaper Co. Ships within Range announcement. Weather report and forecast. 10.30 p.m.Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultaneous on 104.5 metres of Programme given on 1250 metres, commen- cing at 6.45 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART TUESDAY, 3rd APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.—Musical selections. 3.5 p.m.—Hobart Stock Exchange Quotations. Weather information. Items of interest. 3.15 p.m.—Selections by 7ZL Studio Trip: “Ballet music from Rosamonde” (Schubert). Suite, “Summer Days” (Coates). Violin Solo. Selected. Mr. E. J. McCann. “Reverie d'Ambrosi.” Suite, “A Lover in Damascus’* (Woodforde- Finden). Pianoforte Solo. Selected. Mr. A. Robert*. “Serenade Lyrique” (Elgar). “Pizzicato” (Lacome). 4.15 p.m.—Educational Talk. 4.30 p.m.—Close down.


' Perfect at Every Point! with the Hew Filament Point 1: THE PERFECT FILAMENT The Osram Valve Filament is of entirely new Construction and Design. FiuwtuJ MADE IN ENGLAND. It is strong. It embodies a core of tungsten, one of the toughest metals known. It has enormous Electron Emission. Specially selected materials, giving extraordinary high electron emission at very low temperatures are chemi- cally combined to this core. The operating temperature is so low that the filament cannot be seen glowing. It is long. The filament length is greater than that of any other valve of equivalent class, ensuring the best operating charac- teristics. Anti-microphonic. The nature of its construction requires no spring suspension—spring suspen- sion being always an undesirable feature. This provides freedom from microphonic noise troubles. From Leading Radio Dealers. Information from— British General Electric Co. Ltd. 104-114 Clarence Street, Sydney. And all States. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Hector’s corner. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.ro.—Musical selection. 7.36 p.m.—Literary Lapses and Library List* by Mr. W.E. Fuller. y Sta 7.60 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Railway auction produce sales. Weather forecasts. Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour 8.1 p.m.—Broadcast by Direct wire’ from Strand Theatre, Hobart. Selections by Strand Orchestra, Conductor, Mr. Ben Corrick 9.50 p.m.—British Official Wireless news. Mer- cury special interstate news service.' Tas- manian District Weather reports. 9pm Weather forecasts. Weather reports from Australian Capital cities. Station announce- ments. Wednesday’s programme. 10 p.m.—Close down. Wednes., April 4 2FC, SYDNEY EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10 a.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements. 10.5 a.m.—Studio music. 10.15 a.m.—“Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 10.30 a.m.—Studio music. 10.35 a.m.—A reading. 10.45 a.m.—Studio music. 11 a.m.—“Big Ben.” Studio music. 11.5 a.m. —A.P.A. and Reuter’s cable ser- vices. 11.15 a.m.—A talk on home cooking and re- cipes by Miss Ruth Furst. 11.30 a.m.—Close down, MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben” and announcements. 12.2 p.m.—Stock Exchange, first call. 12.3 p.m.—Official weather forecast, rainfall. 12.5 p.m.—Studio music. 12.10 p.m.—Summary of “Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 12.15 p.m.—Rugby wireless news. 12.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Weather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news ser- vice. Producers’ Distributing Society’s report. 1.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange, second call. 1.30 p.m.—Anne Luciano, soprano. 1.35 p.m.—Studio music. 1.55 p.m.—Anne Luciano, soprano. 2 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements. 8.3 p.m.—Popular records. 3.12 p.m.—Daisy Tollis, soprano. 3.16 p.m.—Nelle Larkin, violinist. 3.25 p.m.—Molly Neill, mezzo: “You gave me all my sunshine” (Haydn Wood). 3.30 p.m.—A reading. 3.45 p.m.—John Dellore, tenor. 3.50 p.m.—Anne Payne, mezzo. 3.55 p.m.—Nelle Larkin, violinist. 4.3 p.m.—Studio music. 4.15 p.m.—Daisy Tollis, soprano. 4.20 p.m.—John Dellore, tenor. 4.25 p.m.—Molly Neill, mezzo: “In the silence” (Loughborough). 4.29 p.m.—A talk. 4.40 p.m.—Nelle Larkin, violinist. 4.45 p.m.—Stock Exchange, third call. 4.47 p.m.—Anne Payne, mezzo.


4.50 p.m.—Studio music and results of to. day’s cricket match played in N.Z. Aus- tralia versus Otago North. 6 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close doyn. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The chimes of 2FG. 6.45 p.m.—The “Hello Man” talks to the chil- dren. 6.15 p.m.—Story time for the young folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music. 7 p.m.—“Big Ben” and late sporting news. 7.10 p.m.—Dalgety’s market reports (wool, wheat and stock). 7.18 p.m.—Fruit and vegetable markets. 7.22 p.m.—Weather and shipping news. 7.22 p.m.—“Evening News” late news service. NIGHT SESSION. 7.40 p.m.—Programme announcements. 7.45 p.m.—A talk by Mr. D. J. Mares: “Weather Fallacies.” 8 p.m.—The Newtown Band, conducted by Mr. C. Bignall. 8.20 p.m.—Ernest McKinlay, tenor. (Reappear- ance after an absence from Sydney of four years during which time this artist ap- peared many times with the 8.8. C., Lon- don.) (a) "Ay, Ay. Ay” (Freire). (b) "O, Vision Entrancing" (Thomas). 8.28 p.m.—Lionel Lawson, violinist: “Preludio” (Bach). 8.34 •p.m. —The Newtown Band: 9.8 p.m. —Late weather forecast. 9.9 p.m.—A Late Booking. 9.18 p.m.—The Newtown Band. 9.30 p.m.—Ernest McKinlay. tenor: (a) “A Song Remembered” (Coates), (b) “Mother O’Mine" (Tours). 9 34 p.m.—Lionel Lawson, violinist: “Gavotte* (Bach). 9.44 Fimister, soprano: 9.60 p.m.—The Newtown Band. 10 p.m.—“Big Ben.’* H. W. Varna and Com- pany will produce Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew” (a condensed version in two acts, arranged for broadcasting by 11. W. Varna). 10 p.m.—"The Taming of the Shrew.” Cast: Baptist* of Fadua William Hume Katherine (bis daughter) Gwendolin Sherwood

  • Bianca (his daughter) Cleo Glover

Gremio (Suitor) D. Robertson Hortensio (Suitor) Foster Deans Biondello (Baptista’s servant), D. A. Sharp Petruchio (a Gentleman of Verona) H. W. Varna Grumlo (his man) H. J. Sailor A Widow B. McAlister Ladies, Gentlemen and Attendants. Part One: Scene I.—Public Place, Padua. Scene 2. —Room in Baptista Minola’s House, Padua. Scene 3. —The same as Scene 2. —One week later. 10-40 p.m.—lncidental music to Part 11. 10.42 p.m.—Part II. —“The Taming of the Shrew,” porduced by H. W. Varna and Company: Scene 1. —Petruchio’s House, Verona. Scene 2.—On the road to Padua. Scene 3. —Baptista’s House, Padua. 10.58 p.m.—To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” National Anthem. Close down. 2BL, SYDNEY WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 8 a.in. to 9 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Talk on “Sport” Iby Miss Gwen Varley, Broadcasters’ Women’s Sports Authority. Social Notes —Replies to correspondents. Welfare talk by Mrs Jordan. During the day descriptions will be broadcast from the Royal Agricultural Show. AFTERNOON SESSION. Racing information broadcast iromedia+"lv after each race, by courtesy of the “Sun.” 12 noon.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Special ocean forecast and weather report. 12.3 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 12.8 p.m.—lnformation, mails, shipping, and port directory. 12.11 p.m.—Boats in call by wireless. 12.13 p.m.—Fruit. Market report. 12.15 p.m.—Vegetable Market report. 12.17 p.m.—London Metal Market report. 12.19 p.m.—'Dairy, Farm, and Produce Market report. 12.22 p.m.—Forage Market report. 12.24 p.m.—Fish Market report. 12.26 p.m.- Rabbit Market report. 12.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 12.30 p.m.—H.M.V. Gramophone Recital. 1 p.m. -Broadcast. Speechts from the official luncheon, held at the Royal Agricultural Show. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock ar.d chimes. Racing resume. 2.6 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 2.20 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 2.30 p.m.—Musical programme from Studio. 2.46 p.m.—Talk on "Celtic Mythology.” 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Racing resume. 8.6 p.m.—News from the "Sun.” 3.10 p.m.—Pianoforte Recital from Studio. 8.20 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 3.30 p.m.—Musical programme from Studio 3.40 p.m.—Dungowan Dance Band, broadcast from Dungowan Cabaret. 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Racing resume. 4.5 p.m. -Musical programme from the Studio. 4.15 p.m. -Talk on “The Women of Ancient Rome.” 4.30 p.m.—Dungowan Dance Band. 4.60 p.m.—Features of evening’s programme. 4.52 p.m.—Racing resume. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. SPECIAL COUNTRY SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and cl imes. Australian Mercantile Land and Finance Co.’s report. Weather report and forecast, by courtesy of Government Meteorologist. Producers’ Distributing Society’s Fruit and Vegetable Market report. Stock Exchange report. Grain and Fodder report (“Sun”). Dairy Produce report (“Sun”). N.R.M.A. Talk. 6.45 p.m.—Country News from the “Sun.” 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Gulbransen Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m.—Talk on “Astrology,” by Miss Charlton Smith. EVENING SESSION. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Programme arranged by Messrs. E. F. Wilks and Co., Ltd. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Broadcasters’ Instrumental Trio. 9.7 p.m.—Mr, Leslie McCallum, baritone. 9.14 p.m.—Mr. Harry Thomas, elocutionist. 9.21 p.m.—Miss Ada Althouse. soprano. 9.28 p.m.—Broadcasters’ Instrumental Trio. 9.35 p.m.—Mr. Leslie McCallum. 9.42 p.m.—Mr. Harry Thomas. 9.49 p.m.—Miss Ada Althouse. 9.56 p.m.—Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. 10.1 p.m.—Weather report and forecast, bv courtesy of Mr. C. J. Mares, Government Meteorologist. 10.2 p.m.—Broadcasters’ All-Sports Expert will talk on general sporting. 10.15 p.m.—Romano’s Restaurant Dance Or- chestra. under the dir action of Mr. Merv. Lyons, broadcast from Romano's. Du intervals between dances. “Sun” news will be broadcast. 11.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. National Anthem. 2 UW, SYDNEY WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—Musical items. 7.4 p.m.—Where to Go. 7.10 p.m.—Dinner music. 7.40 p.m.—Vocal and instrumental item*. 7.50 p.m.—Miss Doris Fitzmaurice, elocutionist. Selected. 7.56 p.m.—Studio item. 8 p.m.—News items. 8.10 p.m.—Miss Tyamen, pianoforte solo: Selected. 8.17 p.m.—Studio item. 8.21 p.m —Miss Doris Fitzmaurice, elocutionist. Selected. 8.28 p.m.—Studio item. 8.32 p.m.—Miss Tyamen, pianoforte solo; Selected. 8.40 p.m.—Studio item. 8.45 p.m.— Weather forecast. 8.48 p.m.- Vocal and instrumental items. 9 p.m.—Dance music. 9.55 p.m.—Announcements, 3LO, MELBOURNE. WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m. —Rhythm for the Restless. 7.20 a.m. PHYSICAL CULTURE EXER- CISES (to music). 7.33 a.m. —Weather forecast for all States. 7.40 a.m. —News. 8 a.m. — Melbourne Observatory time signal. 8.1 a.m. —Rhythm for the Restless. 8.5 a.m.—SPORTING INFORMATION. Ship- ping. Stock Exchange fluctuations. 8.13 a.m.—Rhythm for the Restless. 8.15 a.m.—Close down. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. 3LO’s CULINARY COUNSELS or how to create creature comforts with a minimum of cash: — TOMATO SAUCE. 21b. tomatoes. IV2 Qt. vinegar. Boz. salt. 1 oz. black pepper. oz. cayenne. 5 oz. allspice.

  • 4 oz. garlic.

1 oz. cloves. 3% lb. sugar. 2 large onions. Wash and quarter tomatoes, peel and cut up onions. Put on to boil, and when boiling well all over, add all other ingredients— vinegar first, then sugar, etc. Stir till boil- ing again, and boil 2~/% to 3 hours. Do not let it cease boiling ; strain while hot. Bottle and seal. 11.2 a.m.—THE SHRINE OR REMEM- BRANCE—, “Let us see to it that their names are not forgotten—those who fell and those who served. As they answered to the great appeal of King and country, surely we shall not fail to hear the small appeal to join with our fellow citizens throughout Vic- toria in the erection of a fitting memorial. Let each one of us not leave that task to big corporations and companies, but let us make it a personal duty and earn the record


' an DAR° ‘Ever-Ready” users are all enthusiasts 126 HO Hundreds of thousands of “Ever- Ready” Radio Batteries have been sold, and the demand is ever on the increase. “Why?” asks the man in the street. You re probably thinking this minute of some very good reasons. And there are plenty. Not mere power, but the results of years of experiment and re- search are inside the case. They’re made in Australia, and are abso- lutely fresh. First qual- ity materials, sturdy construction, high grade chemicals, efficient in- sulation and unequalled economy make the “Ever-Ready” Austra- lia’s most popular Radio Battery* “EVER-READY ” Torches and Lamps Whether for camping*, mo- toring, emergency, or gene- ral use, Ever-Ready Lamps and Torches are just the thing. Get one now. You will appreciate its conveni- ence, safety, and usefulness on all occasions. Why use matches, or a smoky, sooty oil lamp? STAND No. 7 Radio Exhibition, Town Hall, March 21 to 31. The Ever-Ready Co., 163 Pitt Street - SYDNEY € radio • .L nDA rd a battery STANDA« t of being “one of those who gave the Shrine of Remembrance to the Nation.” Before another sun sets, send forward your con- tributions, however, small, to the organising secretary of the National War Memorial of Victoria. Only thus can we feel that the memorial is really ours. Sir John Macfarland, the Chancellor of the University of Melbourne. 11.5 a.m.—COLONEL POTTINGER will speak on “Woman’s Sphere in the Advancement of Asiatic Races.” 11.20 a.m.—Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m. MRS. A. J. LEWIS will speak on the work of the Homoeopathic Hospital. 11.30 a.m.—Musical interlude 11.45 a.m.—CHARLES NUTTALL : “Let Us Relax.” Sit down and put your feet up—enjoy yourself at your ease. MIDDAY SESSION. 12.20 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUAR TETTE: “Lullaby for a Modern Infant” (Besley). Waltz, “Sleeping Beauty” (Tschaikowsky). 12.30 p.m.—FREDA NORTHCOTE, contralto: “Fairies’ Lullaby.” “Cuckoo.” “Fairy Bell.” 12.37 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 12.40 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUAR- TETTE : “A Children’s Suite” (Ansell) “Puchinello.” “Musical Box.” “A Story Book.” “The Fairy Doll.” 12.55 p.m.—BEATRICE TERNAN, elocution- ist : “Twelve o’clock” (Rabindranath Tagore). “Authorship” (Rabindranath Tagore). 1 p.m. MELBOURNE OBSERVATORY TIME SIGNAL. 1.1 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUAR- TETTE, suite: “A Kiss for Cinderella”—■ “The Prince Kneels at Cinderella’s Feet.” “Enter a Beauty—The Prince Yawns.” “The Beauties Line up for Inspection.” “Cinderella Marries the Prince of her Dreams.” “At the Wedding of the Prince and Cinder- ella.” “March of the Giants” (Finck). 1.10 p.m.—INTERLUDE. Meteorological In- formation. Weather forecast for Victoria. Tasmania, New South Wales, and South Australia. Ocean forecast. River reports. 1.17 p.m.—FREDA NORTHCOTE, contralto: “Daddy and Babsy.” “A little Pink Rose.” “The Children's Hour.” 1.25 p.m.—BEATRICE TERNAN, elocutionist: “The Beginnings” (Rabindranath Tagore). “Baby’s Way” (Rabindranath Tagore). 1.30 p.m.—Speeches transmitted from the Rotary Club Luncheon, Town Hall, Mel- bourne. 2 p.m.—Under the auspices of the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria, .SERGEANT LAMPERD, of the Traffic will speak on:— SAFETY FIRST. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.15 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Overture, “William Tell” (Rossini). 2.25 p.m.—JEAN HAMBLETON, contralto: “Sapphic Ode” (Brahms). “Secrecy” (Wolfe). 2.32 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Overture, “Fingal's Cave” (Mendelssohn). “The Gentle Dove”—A love song. 2.42 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone : “Hear Me! Ye Winds and Waves” (Handel). “Air from the Opera—Scipio” (Handel). 2.49 p.m.—WILLIAM G. JAMES, piano re- cital: “The Cuckoo” (Daquin).


Minuet” (Arne). “Waltz D Flat” (Chopin). “Danse de la Poupee” (Debussy). “Hungarian Dance” - (MacDbwell). 3.4 p.m.—Sporting results. 3.5 p.m.—JEAN HAMBLETON, contralto: “Elegie” (Massenet). “Early Morning” (Peel). 3.12 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Floods of Spring” (Rachmaninoff). “Rescuendo” (Soro). 3.20 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone: “O, flower of all the world” (Woodforde- Finden). “Arietta” (Cyril Scott). IN THE LIGHTER VEIN. 8.27 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection, “lolanthe” (Sullivan). 8.37 p.m.—FRANK and FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet, “Miliana-E.” Steel Guitar, “Hawaiian Love.” Song, “Me and my shadow.” Duet, “Aloha Baby Boy.” 8.49 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Fox trot, “Drifting and Dreaming” (Schmidt). Fox trot, “Me Too” (Woods). 8.55 p.m.—THE FOUR COLORED EM- PERORS OF HARMONY: “Wade in De Water.” “Kentncky Home.” “Hallalu.” “Little David.” 4.7 p.m.—Sporting results. 4.8 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Valse Bluette” (R. Drigo). Tango, “La Roeita.” 4.16 p.m.—VICTOR BAXTER, tenor: “I’ll Sing Thee Songs of Araby” (Clay). “Thistledown and Sunbeams” (Gleeson). 4.23 p.m.—GILBERT BISHOP, violin: Selected. 4.28 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection, “San Toy” (Sid Jones). 4.44 p.m.—Announcements. 4.45 p.m.—Special weather report from Ade- laide. Weather report for Mildura district. 4.46 p.m.—VICTOR BAXTER, tenor: “Ah, Moon of My Delight” (Lisa Lehman). Request item. 4.53 p.m.—STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection, “Ruddigore” (Sullivan). 5 p.m.—Sporting results. “Herald” news ser- vice. Stock Exchange information. 5.16 p.m.—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Answers to letters and birthday greet- ings by “MARY MARY.” 6.20 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6.25 p.m.—W. H. BUTCHER will talk on that fascinating hobby: “Stamps.” 6.40 p.m.—“MARY MARY” will give a series of Grimm’s Fairy Tales. “The Frog Prince.” “The Elves and the Shoemaker.” NEWS AND MARKET REPORTS. 7 p.m.—Acceptances for Williamstown Races held on Easter Monday, and Moonee Valley on Wednesday. Cycling notes by Mr. Ralph Small, hon. secretary Victorian Cyclists’ Union. Official report of Newmarket stock sales by the Associated Stock and Station Agents, Bourke-street, Melbourne. 7.5 p.m.—“Herald” news service. Weather synopsis. Shipping movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 7.17 p.m.—Fish market reports by J. R. Bor- retts, Ltd. Rabbit prices. 7.19 p.m.—River reports. 7.21 p.m.—Market reports by the Victorian Producers’ Co-operative, Ltd. Poultry, grain, hay, straw, jute, dairy produce. Po- tatoes and onions. Market reports of fruit by the Victorian Fruiterers’ Association. Re- tail prices. Wholesale prices of fruit by the Wholesale fruit Merchants’ Association. Citrus fruits. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Under the auspices of the De- PARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, W. J. YUILL, Senior Dairy Supervisor, will speak on: “Lessons from Herd Test Records.” 7.45 p.m.—P. W. PEARCE will speak about “Round shoulders.” 8 p.m.—CAPTAIN PETERS: “Books, Wise and Otherwise.” 8.15 p.m.—Birthday greetings and programme announcements. THE SHRINE OF REMEMBRANCE. To the thousands of men whose bodies lie in far away countries, who made the supreme sacrifice for us, the silent testimony in our midst of a Shine of Remembrance, de- signed as far as possible as an adequate expression of a people’s desire that the sacrifice made on their behalf should never be forgotten, is a proper offering to their blessed memory.—Sir Aaron Danks. 8.16 p.m.—“OLIVET TO CALVARY” (Maun- ders). By the Nicholson Street Methodist Choir. SOLOISTS. Baritone—W. TOWNSEND. Tenor—P. BLUNDELL. Sopranos—V. SPRAGUE and MRS. STRICKLAND. Conductor—H. R. HILLIER, A.L.C.M. Organist—G. MIERISCH. Part I—ON THE WAY TO JERUSALEM. Choir, “When O’er the Steep of Olivet.” Part 2—BEFORE JERUSALEM. Recitative—Tenor, “Like a Fair Vision.” Recitative —Baritone, “O. Jerusalem,” and air. Part 3—IN THE TEMPLE. Recitative—tenor and baritone. “And Jesues Entered Into the Temple.** Saprano solo and Chorus. Chorus, “Another Temple Waits Thee.” Part 4—THE MOUNT OF OLIVES: Tenor solo, “Not of This World the Kingdom of Our Lord.” Chorus, “’Twas night o'er lonely Olivet.” Tenor solo, “He was despised.” Baritone solo and chorus, “Come unto Him.” Hymn, “Just as I Am.” Part 5.—A NEW COMMANDMENT. Recitative and air—baritone, “A New Com- mandment give I unto You.” Chorus, "O, thou whose sweet compassion.” Part S—GETHSEMANE. Recitative —baritone, “And when they had sung a hymn.” Hymn, “Thy will be done*” Part 7—BETRAYED AND FORSAKEN. Chorus. “And while he yet spake.” Recitative and air —tenor, “O, was there ever loneliness like His.” Part B—BEFORE PILATE. Chorus, “Crucify Him.” Part 9—THE MARCH TO CALVARY. Chorus, “The Saviour King goes forth to die.” Part 10—CALVARY. Recitative, baritone* “And they came to a place called Cal- vary.” Soprano solo and chorus: “Droop, Sacred Head.” Hymn, “Rock of Ages.” STUDIO CONCERT. 9.16 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA! “Valse Pathetique” (Baron). “Russian Rural Scene.” 9.27 p.m. —ERNEST SAGE, baritone* “The Trumpter” (Dix). “King Charles” (Maude Valerie White). 9.24 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Serenade” (Friml). “Romance” (Friml). 9.31 p.m.—ERNEST SAGE, baritone: “Invictus” (Bruno Hahn). “Old Barty” (Douglas Grant). 9.40 p.m.—THE STORIES OF THE OPERA —Part 2. NEWS SESSION. 10.10 p.m.—Weather reports. “Argus” news service. British official wireless news from Rugby. -Announcements. Meteorological information. Isand shipping ROYAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF VIC- TORIA’S SAFETY MESSAGE FOR TO- DAY IS— “Slow up, and do not pass other vehicles going in the same direction at curves or street intersections. Be especially careful at blind corners, even though you have the right of way.” Description of grand final of the One Mile Roller Cycling Championship of Victoria, from the Green Mill-, by “Olympus.* 1 “COON CAN.” FROM THE STUDIO. 10.20 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA! “Savoy Southern Memories” (Somers). 10.26 p.m—FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ : Duet, “Hula Maid.” Steel guitar, “Three O’clock in the Morning” Song, “Kuu Ipo.” Duet, “My Honolulu Hula Girl.** 10.36 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Coon Can Rag” (Vessey). Waltz, “Pickanninny Blues” (Klickmann). “Coon’s Carnival” (Waddington). 10.46 p.m.—THE FOUR COLORED EM- PERORS OF HARMONY: “Study war or more.” “Go down, moses.” “It’s me.” “Negro Yodel.” 11 p.m.—OUR GREAT THOUGHT t “Whatever may befall My lot throughout the day, Let me come through it all Fair as I start away ; Let me, when night brings rest, Know that I’ve done by my best.” —Edgar and Guest. DANCE MUSIC. 11.1 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Me and my shadow” (Jolson). “Pleading” (Jones). “My idea of Heaven” (Henderson). 11.10 p.m.—THE 11080 in the Hobnails has just blown in, and will entertain you with the Sparkle of the Sunshine has been saun- tering in. 11.17 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS. 11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. 3AR, MELBOURNE WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. MIDDAY CONCERT SESSION. 12 noon to 1 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House. 252 Collins Street (by exclusive permission of Wills and Paton, Ltd.), on the Brunswick Panatrope. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL DANCE CONCERT. Sport. During the afternoon, results of the Sunbury Races, together with other infor- mation, will be broadcast immediately after each race is run. 2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. A half-hour Dance Session by Melbourne's favorite Dance Band. The latest popular hits, each one announced prior to its pre- sentation. 2.30 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Selection: “Wildflower” (Herbert). “Serenade Italien” (Schebek). 2.45 p.m.—Miss Ruth Phillips, soprano? Recit. and Air: “Ombra Mai Fu” (Handel). “Pale Moon” (Logan).


BUY YOUR PARTS from Keogh Radio Supplies Manufacturers of the famous KEOGH RADIO SET AERIAL WIRE. Electron, 100 ft. 2/6 3/20 Bare Copper, 100 ft 2/6 Silk Covered Loop, 100 ft 7/6 DRY BATTERIES. Ever-Ready, 40 Volt B 12/6 Ever-Ready, 60 Volt B 18/- Ever-Ready, AV S Volt C 2/9 Eltax, 60 Volt B 14/6 Bright Star, 45 large B 25/- Columbia, 45 large B 25/- Columbia, iy s Volt A 3/- Burgess, 45 large B 26/- WET BATTERIES. 4 Volt “A”, from 6 Volt “A”, from 90 Volt “B” 80 Volt “B” £2/4/- £3/5/- £B/15/- £5/-/- BATTERY CABLES. 5 Cord, with Spad§a 2/3 7 Cord, with Spades 3/6 VARIABLE CONDENSERS. .00025 Straight Line 11/6, 12/6 .00035 Straight Line .... 10/-, 12/6 .0005 Straight Line, 9/6, 10/6,’ 11/6 and 12/6. 7 Plate, Midget 5/3 CONDENSER DIALS. 4in. Plain 4in. Vernier Back Panel, Vernier .. Back Panel, with Switch 3/- 4/9, 6/9, 7/6 6/6 lO- / AND PLUGS. Single Circuit 1/3, 1/6, 1/9 Double Circuit 2/-, 2/6 Single Filament Control ’ 3/6 Phone Plugs 1/3, 3/_ HEADPHONES. New System ... Tefag Sterling 12/6 12/6 30/- LOUD SPEAKERS AND CORDS. 20 feet, with Tips 2/3 5 feet, with Tips 1/- Complete Range of Speakers, from 28/6 to £lO/10/-. TRANSFORMERS. R.C.A., No. 712 12/- A.W.A., 8%-l, 6-1 18/- Emmco, 8%-l, 5-1 17/6 Ferranti, AF3, 42/6; AF4 . 32/- Rauland Lyric 45/- Ammatran, 5-1 19/6 VALVES. Cossor, 2 Volt Series, UV base .. 6/6 Cossor, UX Base 13/6 Cossor, Power, TJX 15/- Mullard, PM, TJX Base 13/6 Milliard, PM Power 15/- Philips’. UX Base 13/6 Philips’, Special Detector 17/6 Osram, DEB, LV and HF 5/6 Osram, DE3 B. and DE4 6/6 Radiotron, UX 201 A, Ist class .. 11/ Radiotron, UXI99 13/- VALVE SOCKETS. Universal, UX Bases* 1/9, 2/6, 3/3, 4/- English • • VS Sub-panel, UX 1/3, 3/- MISCELLANEOUS. Toggle Battery Switch 3/- Battery Terminal Boards 2/9 R.F. Choked 8/6, 8/9 Hydrometer Floats I/ 6 Extension Cord Connectors 2/- Headphone Cords .. * 1/^ Our Time Payment applies to ACCUMULATORS, A. & B. LOUDSPEAKERS BATTERY ELIMINATORS. COMPLETE SETS BATTERY CHARGERS. GRAMOPHONES, ETC. KEOGH RADIO SUPPLIES 40a PARK STREET (Between Castlereagh and Pitt Streets ) Open till 9 p.m. Fridays 2.53 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Two Hindoo Pictures” (Lotter). Selection: “Bombo” (Romberg). 3.12 p.m.—Miss Ruth Phillirs, soprano: “Chanson Indoue” (Rimsky-Korsakov). “The Hawke” (Clarke), 8.20 p.m.—Ayarz Dansoniana. 3.30 p.m.—lnterval announcements. 8.35 p.m.—Dr. George Payne Philpots, Presi- dent of the Food Education Society of Vic- toria. and Editor of the National MagazirTe of Health. 8.45 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra i “Four Spanish Pictures” (Luzzatti) “The Eternal Spring” (Rolt). 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock rays “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second weather forecast. 4.3 p.m.—Mr. Bernard Thomas, tenor: “The Birth of Morn” (Leoni). “Keep on Hopin’ ” (Maxwell). 4.11 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 4.27 p.m.—Mr. Bernard Thomas tenor: “Evening Song” (Blumenthal). “Macushla” (MacMurrough). 4.35 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra % “Prairie Sketches” (Cadman). “Three Irish Pictures” (Ansell). 4.55 p.m.—Announcements. To-night’s enter- tainment. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Five.’* God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—3Aß’s Cousin Peter. EVENING SESSION. “CONCERT HALL AND BALLROOM.” 7.15 p.m.—Our Boy Scouts. Commissioner W. D. Kennedy. Deputy Camp Chief of Victor a will give his interesting weekly notes and news on the Scout movement. 7.35 p.m.—Sport Session. “Harlequin” pre- sents his budget of up-to-date news and comments on Sport of the Day. 7.50 p.m.—Macnamara’s stock reports. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Overture: “like” (Doppler). “Four Cinderella Dances” (Lohr). 8.18 p.m.—Miss Frances Dillon, soprano: “Aprile” (Tosti). “Spring” (Tosti). 8.26 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 8.42 p.m.—Mr. Herbert Pettifer, violin: “Elegie” (Puzzini). 8.47 p.m.—Announcements. 9 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Grieg Fantasie” (Urbach). 9.15 p.m.—Miss Frances Dillon, soprano: “A Brown Bird Singing” (Wood). “Swing Low. Sweet Chariot” (Burleigh). 9.22 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 9.28 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sport results. 9.35 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “First African Suite” (Dorothea Barcroft). 9.50 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Ten.” 10.1 p.m.—Semi-final weather forecast, apeci- ally for our Country Listeners. 10.3 p.m.—Mr. Joseph Fava, tenor: “La Donna e Mobile” (Verdi). “In Sympathy” (Leoni). 10.11 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Minnesold” (Joan Fresco). “Scenes from the South” (Nicode). 10.26 p.m.—Mr. C. Richard Chugg. flute: “Andante” (Mozart). 10.30 p.m.—Mr. Joseph Pava, tenor: “Questa O Quella” (Verdi). “Adieu, Marie” (Adams). 10.38 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 10.50 p.m.—“Age” news service, exclusive to 3AR. 10.58 p.m.—Final weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good-night quote is taken from the poem. “The Dark Com- panion,” by Brunton Stephens. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eleven.” God Save the King.


4QG, BRISBANE WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. No PHYSICAL CULTURE SESSION. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. MIDDAY SESSION. 1 p.m.—Market reports; weather information ; “The Daily Mail” and “The Daily Standard” news. 1.30 p.m.—Lunch hour music. 1.53 p.m.—Standard time signal. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 8.30 p.m.—Mail train running times. 8.81 p.m.—A programme of music from the studio. 4.15 p.m.—“The Telegraph” news; weather news. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Mail train running times; “Daily Standard” news; announcements. 6.10 p.m.—Lecturette: An Astronomy Talk— “ The Outer Giant Planets,” by Mr. A. K. Chapman. 6.30 p.m,—The children’s hour—stories by “Little Miss Brisbane.” 7 pun.—Special news service; market reports; stock reports. 7.30 p.m.—Weather news; announcements. 7.43 p.m.—Standard time signal. 7.45 p.m.—Lecture arranged by the Queens- land Agricultural High School and College. NIGHT SESSION. • p.m.—A programme of music by A If. Feathers tone and His Studio Syncopators, including: Fox trots: (a) “All I Want is You” (Davis), (b) “Down Kentucky Way” (Hall). Fox Ttrots: (a) “Wake up Little Girl” (Kerscber). (b) “A Sun Kist Cottage” (Grass). Fox trots: (a) “Ta-Ta” (Cottier). (b) “My Honey's Lovin’ Arms” (Meyer). Jazz Waltz: (a) “Sing Me a Song of Hawaii” (Gould). ) (b) “Love is Just a Little Bit of Heaven” (Bryer). Fox Trots: (a) "Shanghai Dream Man” (Davis). (b) “Just a Memory” (Henderson). Rhythmic Paraphrase: “Fantasie Orientale” (arr. Lange). Fox Trot: “Moonlight on the Ganges” (Myers). Fox Trots: (a) “Hello Bluebird” (Friend). (b) the Use of Crying” (Forbes- tein.) Fox Trots: (a) “When Lights Are Low in Cairo” (Myers). “Crazy Words, Crazy Tune” (Ager). Between dance items the following will be broacast: Instrumental items: (a) “The Two Brass Men” (Lany). (b) “Flow Gently Deva” (Party). The Clarwin Duo. Humor by Lauri the Entertainer. Baritone Solos. Selected. Mr. D. Daniels. 10 p.m.—The “Daily Mail” news; weather news. Close down. SCL, ADELAIDE. WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon. —G.P.O. Chimes. 12.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service, and Bri- tish Wireless News. 12.30 p.m. —Popular numbers on the Studio “Recreator.” 12.50 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 12.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 1 p.m. —G.P.O. Chimes. 1.1 p.m.—Symphony Orchestra numbers on the “Recreator.” 1.30 p.m.—Vocal and miscellaneous numbers on the “Recreator.” 1.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. chimes. 3.1 p.m.—Pianoforte recital. 3.30 p.m.—Menu talk by “Homelover.” 3.45 p.m.—Fashion talk by J. Craven and Co. 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 4.1 p.m.—Dance numbers on the “Recreator.” 4.20 p.m.—Vocal and miscellaneous numbers on the “Recreator.” 4.67 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. EVENING SESSION. C p.m.—Q.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Entertainment for children by the 6CL Radio Family. 6.80 p.m.—Dinner Music on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 6.50 p.m.—General Market reports by A. W. Sandford and Co.. A. E. Hall and Co., Dal- gety and Co., S.A. Farmers Co-operative Union, Taylor Bros., Retail Grocers Asso- ciation, Interstate Fruit and Produce Mar- ket Co. Ltd. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 7.7 p.m.—Scripture Reading. 7.15 p.m.—Extracts from News Bulletin sup- plied by Minister for Markets and Migration. 7.45 p.m.—Travel talk. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Relayed from Henley Beach Rotunda, band selections by Holden’s Silver Band, in- terspersed with numbers from the Studio, by Tom King, piano. Lizette Foglia, violin. G. Goldsworthy, cello. Fred Williamson, tenor. 8.45 p.m.—Vocal recital by Fred Williamson, tenor. 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 9.1 p.m.—Meteorological information. 9.3 p.m.—Dalgety’s wheat report. 9.5 p.m.—British Wireless news. 9.15 p.m.—Henley Beach relay continued. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” News Service 10.13 p.m.—Shipping list. 10.15 p.m.—Relayed from Maison de Danse, Glenelg—Dance Music. 10.55 p.m.—Thursday’s programme and meteo- rological information. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 6WF, PERTH. WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 12.30 p.m.—Tune in. 12.35 p.m.—Markets, News, and Cables. 1 p.m.—Time signal. 1.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. 1.2 p.m.—Studio Quintette. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Tune in. 3.35 p.m.—Talk : “Fashions” "by Junette. 3.55 p.m.—Orchestral music played by Hoyts Orchestra, conducted by Mr. Harold Parting- ton, relayed from Hoyts Regent Theatre, William street. Vocal interludes from the studio. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. ' EVENING SESSION. 6.45 p.m.—Tune in. The evening transmission is broadcast on 104.5 metres as well as the usual wavelength. 6.50 p.m.—Stories for the Kiddies by Uucles Henry, Bertie and Duffy. 7.20 p.m.—Stocks, Markers. News. 7.45 p.m.—Sporting talk. 8 p.m.—Time signal. 8.1 p.m.—Weather notes supplied by the Me- teorological Bureau of Western Australia. Station announcements such as alterations to to programmes, etc. 8.5 p.m.—Classical Night. Musical programme from the Studio, includ- ing vocal and instrumental artists. Orchestral music played Iby Harold Parting- ton and his seventeen piece orchestra, re- layed from Hoyts Regent Theatre, William street. 10 p.m.—Late News items by courtesy of “The Daily News” Newspaper Co. Ships within range announcement. Weather report and forecast. 10.30 p.m.—Close down. 104.5 METRE TRANSMISSION. Simultaneous broadcast on 104.5 metres of Programme given on 1250 metres, commen- cing at 6.45 p.m. 7ZL, HOBART WEDNESDAY, 4th APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.—Musical selection. 3.5 p.m.—Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. Weather information. Items of interest. 3.15 p.m.—Selections from the Glen Tea Rooms interspersed with readings from the Illus- trated Tasmanian Mail. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Hector’s half hour. 7 p.m. —Birthday Greetings and story from Illustrated Tasmanian Mail. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30. p.m. —Weekly Scouting Chat. 7.35 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Railway auction produce sales. Weather forecasts. Hobart Stock Ex- change quotations. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 8.1 p.m.—Concert from the Studio. Miss Ruby Wallace, soprano. Miss D. Mannering, soprano. Miss Enid Knight, soprano. Miss Jean Hibbard, soprano. Miss Ruby Piesse, accompanist. Miss Joan Scott-Power. Pianoforte solos. Mr. Reg. Cooper, Bass-baritone. Mr. Owen Burrows, baritone. Mr. George Muir, tenor. Mr. Hugh Taylor, elocutionist. 9.40 p.m.--British Official Wireless news. 9.50 p.m.—Murcury special Interstate news serviuce. Ship 3 within wireless range. 9 p.m. Weather forecasts. Tasmanian District Weather ’•euorts. Weather reports from Australian Capital cities. Station announce- ments. Thursday’s programme. 10 p.m.—Close down.


<y. a made to run the full race / Any sprinter can start well, but it takes a stayer to win in a long run. It’s the same with batteries. The power to stick is the thing to look for —never-fading power over a long period of service. Millions buy Burgess Chrome batteries for this reason. They keep going long after others flag and fail. §I/a Chrome —the great preserva- tive used in finest leather, metals and paints, is also used and patented in Burgess Batteries. It gives them unusual staying power. BURGESS 2e*> BATTERIES Sold by all high-class dealers . New System Telephones Pty. Ltd. 280 Castlereagh St., Sydney 181-183 King Street, Melbourne Charles Street. Adelaide. Q’land Agents : Canada Cycle and Motor Agency (Q.) Ltd. Creek and Adelaide Sts. Brisbane Thurs., April 5 2FC, SYDNEY. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. MORNING SESSION. 10 a.m.—“Big: Ben” and announcements. 10.5 a.m.—Studio music. 10.15 a.m.—“Sydney Morning Herald” new. service. 10. CO a.m.—Studio music. 10.35 a.m.—Last minute Sporting informati >n by the 2 FC Racing Commissioner. 10.45 a.m.—Studio music. 11 a.m.—“Big Ben.” Studio music. 11.5 a.m.—A.P.A. and Reuter’s Cable service 11.10 a.m.—Studio music. 11.15 a.m.—A Reading. 11.30 a.m.—Close down. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben” and announcements. 12.2 p.m.—Stock Exchange, first call. 12.3 p.m.—Official Weather forecast, rainffti’. 12.5 p.m.—Studio music. 12.10 p.m.—Summary of “Sydney Morning Herald” news service. 12.15 p.m.—Rugby wireless news. 12.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Weather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news ser- vice. Producers’ Distributing Society’s report. 1.20 p.m.—Studio music. 1.28 p.m.—-Stock Exchange, second call. 1.30 p.m.—Margaret Butterworth, contralto. 1.34 p.m.—Studio music. 1.50 p.m.—Margaret Butterworth, contralto. 1.55 p.m.—The 2FC Racing Commissioner: Late Sporting news. 2.5 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements. 3.3 p.m.—Dorothy Gadsby, pianoforte solo (pupil of Dorothy Gibbes). 3.10 p.m.—Madeline Hall, soprano. 3.15 p.m.—Frederick Brewer, baritone. 3.20 p.m.—Studio music. 3.30 p.m.—Jeanette Rooney, contralto. 3.35 p.m.—Agnes McDiarmid, soprano. 3.40 p.m.—A Reading. 3.55 p.m.—Dorothy Gadsby, pianoforte solo. 4.5 p.m.—Popular records. 4.15 p.m.—Madeline Hall, soprano. 4.20 p.m.—Frederick Brewer, baritone. 4.25 p.m.—Studio music. 4.35 p.m.—Jeanette Rooney, contralto. 4.45 p.m.—Stock Exchange, third call. 4.47 p.m.—ltems from the Capitol Theatre. 5 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The Chimes of 2FC. 5.45 p.m.—The “Hello Mau” talks to the children. 6.15 p.m.—Story time for the young folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music. 7 p.m.—Late sporting news, told by the 2FC Racing Commissioner. 7.10 p.m.—Dalgety’s Market reports (wool, wheat and stock). 7.18 p.m.—Fruit and Vegetable Markets. P.D.S. Poultry reports. 7.22 p.m.—Weather and Shipping ne\ys. 7.26 p.m.—“Evening News” late news service. NIGHT SESSION. 7.40 p.m - -Programme announcements. Grand Opera Night. 7.45 p.m.-—Alfred Hill: A Talk on the Teachers’ Conference to be held in Sydney at Easter. e


8 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra: Tannhauser, “Fantasie” (Wagner). 8.15 p.m.—Ernest Archer (tenor), and Mabel Batchelor (soprano: “Miserere,” from “II Trovatore” (Verdi). 8.20 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra: Conductor, Horace Keats. 8.32 p.m.—Frank McEachern, basso: (a) “The Deathless Army” (Trotere). (b) “Land of Delight” (Sanderson). 8.40 p.m.—Mabel Batchelor, soprano: (a) “Boat Song” (Harriet Ware). (With Orchestral accompaniment.) (b) “The Spring is in My Garden” (Tennent) (Orchestral accompaniment.) 8.48 p.m.—Charles Armand, basto. 8.56 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra: Conductor, Horace Keats. 9.6 p.m.—Late Weather forecast. 9.7 p.m.—Ernest Archer, tenor. 9.15 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra. 9.28 p.m.—Frank McEachern (basso) and Ernest Archer (tenor) : of the Night” (Sergeant) 9.32 p.m.—Mabel Batchelor, soprano: “Spring dropped a song into my Heart” (Tenner) (Orchestral accompaniment). 9.36 p.m.—Charles Armand, basso. 9.44 p.m.—The 2FC Studio Orchestra, con- ducted by Horace Keats. 9.55 p.m.—Frank McEachern (basso) and Ernest Archer (tenor) : Duet, “The Battle Eve” (Bonheur). 10 p.m.—“Big Ben.” From The Ambassadors: The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra, conducted by A 1 Hammet 10.10 p.m.—Frank Chapman, entertainer— From the Studio: Song, Comic: “I'm not all there” (Harry Carlton). 10.18 p.m.—From The Ambassadors: Dance music by The Ambassadors’ Orchestra 10.26 p.m.—From the Studio: Frank Chap- man, entertainer: Monologue, “The Last Bottle” (Peter Cheney). 10.33 p.m.—Late Weather forecast. 10.34 p.m.—From The-Ambassadors : Dance music by .The Ambassadors Orchestra 10.57 p.m.—From the Studio: To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra, in popu- lar numbers until 11.45 p.m. 11.45 p.m.—National Anthem. Close down. 2BL, SYDNEY. THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. v MORNING SESSION. During the day, descriptions from the Royal Agricultural Show. 10.30 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimea. Musical programme from Studio. 10.40 a.m.—News from the “Daily Telegraph Pictorial.” 10.50 a.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 11 a.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimea. Women’s Session. Social Notes. Replies to correspondents. Talk on “ Architecture,” by Mr. Brogan. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes, special ocean forecast and weather report. 12.3 p.m.—Musical programme from Studio. 12.8 p.m.—lnformation, mails, shipping, and poet directory. 12.11 p.m.—Boats in call by wireless. 12.18 p.m.—Fruit Market report. 12.15 p.m.—Vegetable Market report. 12.1? p.m.—London Metal Market report. 12.19 p.m.—Dairy, Farm, and Produce Market report. 12.22 p.m.—Forage Market report. 12.24 p.m.—Fish Market report. 12.26 p.m.—Rabbit Market report. 12.28 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 12.30 p.m.—H.M.V. Gramophone Recital. 1.27 p.m.—Stock Exchange report. 1.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Talk to children, and special entertainment for children in hospitals. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. Racing information, broadcast immediate!* after each race, by courtesy of the “Sun” newspapers. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. News from the “Sun.” 3.10 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 3.20 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 3.30 p.m.—Musical programme from Studio. 3.40 p.m.—Dungowan Dance Band., broadcast from Dungowan Cabaret. 4 p.m.—G.*P.O. Clock and chimes. News from the “Sun.” 4.8 p.m.—Musical programme from the Studio. 4.15 p.m.—Talk on “The Women of Ancient Rome.” 4.30 p.m.—Dungowan Dance Band. 4.50 p.m.—News from the “Sun.” 4.57 p.m.—Features of evening’s piogramme. 4.69 p.m.—Racing resume. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 6.45 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Children’s Session. SPECIAL COUNTRY SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Australian Mercantile Land and Finance Co.’s report. Weather report and forecast, by courtesy of Government Meteorologist. Producers’ Distributing Society’s Fruit and Vegetable Market report. Stock Exchange report. Grain and Fodder report (“Sun”). Dairy Produce report (“Sun”). 6 45 p.m.—Country News from the “Sun.** 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Dinner Music. 7.30 p.m.—News from the “Sun.** EVENING SESSION. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. Broadcasters* Topical Chorus. 8.3 p.m.—Miss Anne Gurr. mezzo-sonran-. 8.10 n.m.—The Wurlitzer Organ broadcast the Arcadia Theatre, Chatswood. Organist, Mr. N. Robins. 8.15 p.m.—From the Studio: Mr. Leo. Packer, baritone. 8.22 p.m.—Mr. Haagen Holenbergh, pianist. 8.32 p.m.—Mr. Stanley R. Catlett tenor. 8.39 p.m.—The Britbh Music Society’s String Quartette. 8.49 p.m.—Miss Mary Neal, mezzo-contralto. 8.56 p.m.—The Silver Quartette. 9.3 p.m.—Miss Anne Gurr. 9.10 p.m.—Mr. Haagan Holenbergh. 9.20 p.m.—Mr. Leo. Packer. 9.27 p.m.—Miss Mary Neal. 9.34 p.m.—The British Music Society’s String Quartette. 9.41 p.m.—Mr. Stanley R. Catlett. 9.48 p.m.—Silver Quartette. 10.5 p.m.—Resume of following day’s pro- gramme. Weather report and forecast, by courtesy of Mr. C. J. Mares, Government Meteorolo- gist. 10.10 p.m.-—The Wurlitzer Organ, broadcast from the Arcadia Theatre, Chatswood. 10.25 p.m.—The Wentworth Cafe Orchestra, under the direction of Mr. S. Simpson, broad- cast from the ballroom of the Wentworth. During intervals between dances, “Sun” news will be broadcast. 11.30 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock and chimes. National Anthem. 3LO, MELBOURNE THURSDAY, sth APRIL. 1928. EARLY MORNING SESSION. 7.15 a.m. —Jazz Jingles for the Gymnastic Jerks. 7.20 a.m.—Physical Culture Exercises to the Jazz Jingles). 7.33 a.m.—Weather Forecast for all States; Mails. 7.40 a.m.—NEWS. 8.0 a.m. —Melbourne Observatory Time Signal. 8.1 a.m. —Jazz Jingles. 8.5 a.m.—NEWS. Sporting Information ; Shipping; Stock Exchange Information. 8.13 a.m. —Jazz Jingles. 8.15 a.m.—Close Down. MORNING SESSION. 11.0 a.m.—3LO’s CULINARY COUNSELS, or how to create creature comforts with a minimum of cash. TUTTI, FRUTTI TART. (BISCUITS)

  • 4lb.- good short crust (with one table-

spoon sugar), 2 tablespoons currants, sul- tanas, raisins, cup cherries, chopped al- monds, sugar. Small piece of lemon-peel, 1 tablespoon marmalade, 1 teaspoon cin- namon, 2 tablespoons sherry or lemon juice. Roll out crust, and line a long narrow tin with it. Mix all ingredients together, and chop up or put through a coarse mincer. Spread over the crust, ornament with strips of pastry, and bake in hot oven 20 minutes, or until the crust is brown and crisp. When cool, cut into pieces about two inches wide and three inches long. 11.2 a.m.—THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN— Keep yours well stocked with SPINACH. This vegetable is easily grown. The chief essentials are plenty of moisture, good rich soil, plenty of room for the plants to develop, and liquid fertiliser to keep the plants moving. Be careful not to let the fertiliser get on the leaves, and be sure the ground is moist before applying. The Prickly is the variety for sowing at this period of the year. 11.5 a.m. —A STUART will speak about: “Electric Fires in the Home.” 11.20 a.m. —Musical interlude. 11.25 a.m.—MATRON MORELAND: “Mothercraft.” 11.40 a.m. —Musical Interlude. 11.45 a.m.—MRS. HENRIETTA C. WALKER: The Art of being a Settler. “Some More Makeshift Furniture.” MIDDAY SESSION. CURRENT CHRONICLES. 12.0 noon.—Melbourne Observatory Time Sig- nal. 12.1 p.m.—Metal Prices received by the Aus- tralian Mines and Metals Association by the London Stock Exchange this day; British Official Wireless News from Rugby ; Reuter’s and the Australian Press Associa- tion Cables; “Argus” News Service. COMMUNITY SINGING. 12.15 p.m.—Community Singing from the As- sembly Hall, Collins Street, Melbourne (Con- ductor, G. J. Mackay), assisted by BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: Soloists: OLIVER PEACOCK, Baritone: “From Out the Long Ago” (Stratton). “Where Heaven Is” (O’Hara). FREDA STEVENS, Soprano: “Love’s Coronation” (Alyward). “Husheen” (Needham). 1.45 p.m.—Meteorological Information; Weather Forecast and Rainfall for Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and New South Wales; River Reports; Ocean Forecasts; Stock Exchange Information. 1.55 p.m.—Under the auspices of the National Safety Council of Victoria, J. T. SAXTON, Assistant Chief Inspector of the Education Department, will speak on: “SAFETY FIRST.” 2.10 p.m.—Close Down.


SNAP ON YOUR POWER AS YOU DO 6 YOUR LIGHT / Acme Socket Power takes all battery troubles out of radio. Just plug into your near- est electric light or power socket; and with Acme to rectify the current to suit your set, you have full force of silent power at trifling cost per hour. Acme Socket Power never fails Yours on Easy Terms New System Telephones Pty. Ltd. 280 Castlereagh St., Sydney AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.15 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA* “Andante Cantabile” (L. von Buther) “Cavatina from Faust” (Gounod) ' 2.25 p.m.—LILLIAN CRISP, Soprano (by per- mission of J. C. Williamson, Ltd) : “Porgi Amor” t Mozart). “The Little Damozel” (Novello). 2.32 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA • “Eventide at the Convent” (Pratt) “Humoreske” (Dvorak). 2.42 p.m.—DOLLY BURDETT, Contralto- “ The Praise £ God” (Beethoven). “The Minstrel Boy” (Tom Moore) 2.49 p.m.—AGNES FORTUNE, Piano: Selection from the works of Chopin*. 3.0 p.m.—Announcements. EDUCATION HOUR. 3.1 p.m.—DR. LOFTUS HILLS: “Topics of the Week.” 3.15 p.m.—WILLIAM G. JAMES will talk to Students of Music. 3.30 p.m.—FRANCES FRASER: “Easter Time at Home and Abroad.” “We have grown so accustomed tc doing certain things at certain stated times that we do not stop to think WHY we do them. Some of us regard Easter time as a religious observance, while other* look on it as a mere holiday time, without any real con- sideration of its origin or the why and wherefore of its existence. Do we know what the word LENT means, or SHROVE Tuesday, or how people in other lands ob- serve this time of the year? Let us take a few minutes to consider such questions.” A VARIED PROGRAMME. 3.45 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA : “Chevalier’s Coster Songs.” 3.65 p.m.—FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ: Steel Guitar, “Kawaihau Waltz.” Song, “Isles of Paradise.” Duet, “Calm Hawaiian Seas.” 4.7 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection .“Ruddigore” (Sullivan). 4.15 p.m.—LILLIAN CRISP, Soprano: “Pale Moon” (Logan). “Poppies for Forgetting” (Clarke). 4.22 p.m.—TASMA TIERNAN, ’Cello: Selected. 4.30 p.m.—DOLLY BURDETT, Contralto: “Voco di donna d’Angela”—La Gioconda (Ponchielli). “Wondering Why.” 4-37 p.m.—“Herald” News Service; Stock Exchange Information. 4.43 p.m.—Special Weather Report from Adelaide; Weather Report for the Mildura district. 4.45 p.m.—Evensong from St. Paul’s Cathedral. 5.30 p.m.—Close Down. EVENING SESSION. 6.0 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings, “MARY GUMLEAF.” 6.20 p.m.—Musical Interlude. 6.25 p.m.—“MARY GUMLEAF.” Poems for the Little Ones. “Wireless Without Wire.” “The Evening Star.” And a Story, “Willie Weasles Circus.” 6.35 p.m.—Musical Interlude. 6.40 p.m.—CAPT. DONALD MacLEAN: “The Spanish Conquests of America.” How the Dons, discovered the Treasures of the World. NEWS AND MARKET REPORTS. 7.0 p.m.—“Herald” News Service; Weather Synopsis ; Shipping Movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange Information. 7.17 p.m.—Fish Market Reports by J. R. Bor- rett, Ltd.; Retail Prices. 7.19 p.m.—River Reports. 7.22 p.m.—Market Reports by the Victorian , Producers’ Co-operative Co., Ltd., Poultry, Grain, Hay, Straw, Jute, Dairy Produce, Potatoes and Onions ; Market Reports of Fruit by the Victorian Fruiterers’ Associa- tion ; Retail prices; Wholesale Prices of Fruit by Wholesale Fruit Merchants’ Asso- ciation ; Citrus Fruf€7 Ballarat Pig Market Reports by the Ballarat Stock and Station Agents. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—COLONEL POTTINGER : Asiatic Problems Affecting Australia. Demand of India for Home Rule—Difficul- ties in Granting It. 7.45 p.m.—CHARLES WHELAN, now ap- pearing in the Gilbert and Sullivan Opera Company at His Majesty’s Theatre, will speak to you from his dressing-room (by permission of J. C. Williamson, Ltd.). 8.0 p.m.—MAJOR H. SHENTON COLE, of the London and North-eastern Railway, will speak on “Tour and Trade Within the Empire.” 8.15 p.m.—Birthday Greeting and Programme Announcements. THE SHRINE OF REMEMBRANCE.—An ancient Jewish race once declared, “The righteous need no memorial of stone; their good deeds are their memorials.” How true this statement is of the many hundred of thousands of our men who by deeds of heroism, unflinching devotion and loyalty and supreme self-sacrifice, erected for them- selves everlasting memorials. But LEST WE FORGET, and to remind us not only of what we owe ibut of what we ought, an outward symbol of beauty, serenity and il- lumination is not only desir; ble but neces- sary.” —(Rabbi Brodie.) 3LO’S DANCE PROGRAMME. 8.16 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Down Kentucky Way” (Hull). “Yesterday” (Harrison). “There Will Come a Timi” (Garren). 8.25 p.m.—FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet. “On the Beach of Waikiki.” “Ukulele Solo Medley.” 8.28 p.m—THE VAGABONDS: “Red Lips Kiss My Blues Away” (Bryan). “My Idea of Heaven” (Johnson). “The Magic of Moonlight and Love” (Hayoss). 8.37 p.m.—A Talk on the War Memorial. 8.42 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Funny Tune” (Olsen). “Sing Me a Baby Song” (Kahn). “I’ve Got a Yes Girl” (Corney). 8.51 p.m.—KATHLEEN NICHOLLS, Soprano« “Over the Waters Blue” (Coningsby Clarke) 8.54 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Barbara” (Silver). “Dancing Tambourine” (Polla). “All By My Ownsome” (Kahn). 9.3 p.m.—An Australian will give an audible demonstration of his idea of “Risibility Run Rampant.” ( 9.7 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Egyptian Echoes” (Black). “Are You Happy?” (Agar). “Who’s Loving You To-night?” (Rose). 9.16 p.m.—THE “TRAMP” trudges in and will sing: “London Bridge” (Peccia). 9.19 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Following You Around” (Kahn). “Crazy Words, Crazy Tune” (Agar). “Moonlit Waters” (Friend). 9.28 p.m.—FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ: Song, “Pua Mohala.” Duet, “Since Ukulek' Lady had a Ukulele Baby.” 9.31 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Diane” (Rapee). “I Walked Back from the Buggy Ride” (Adams). “To-night You Belong to Me” (Little). 9.40 p.m.—KATHLEEN NICHOLLS, Soprano: “Love’s a Merchant” (Mollie Carew). 9.43 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Rose of the Volga” (Kahn). “From Now On” (Friend). “Broken Hearted” (Lewis). 9.52 p.m.—NORMAN BRADSHAW, Tenor: “I’m Longing for You” (Hathaway). 9.55 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: Lazy Weather” (Trent). “Piano Solo”—Doll Dance. 10.0 p.m.—“Argus” News Service; British Official Wireless News from Rugby; Meteoro- logical Information ; Announcements : Sport- ing Notes by “Olympus”; Island Shipping Movements. The Royal Automobile Club of Victoria’s SAFETY MESSAGE for to-day is for MOTORISTS:


“If you haven’t a self-starter, foe careful not to break your when cranking. Always pull the crank i.p, NOT DOWN, and don’t spin it unless absolutely necessary.” THE GLORY OF THE GARDEN: Keep yours gay with fragrant flowers. Have you planted your polyanthus, primroses or sweet peas yet ? Sow in a warm position and before the weather becomes too cold. 10.15 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: ' My Ohio Home” (Kahn). “The Spell of the Moon” (Kahn). “Oh, Pimpinella” (Yvian). “Stay Out of the South” (Dixon). 10.24 p.m.—FRANK AND FRANCIS LUIZ: “Imi Au la Oe.” “Like No a Like.” 10.27 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Lady Do” (Young). “My Hawaiian Evening Star” (Polla). “Yale Blues” (Ellis). 10.36 p.m.—THE TRAMP prepares to pack his Matilda and beat it again for the tracks, but before he leaves he will sing us: “The Old Road” (Scott). 10.39 p.m.—THE KNOCKABOUTS, those Scintillating, Syncopating, Sentimentalists, in: “The Girl Friend.” Selected. 10.48 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS: “Just a Little Cuter" (Alexander). “She Belorgs to Me” (Johnson). “Blowing Off Steam” (Davis). 10.57 p.m.-NORMHN BRADSHAW. Tenor: “Belle Mtjquise” (Bernard RoltT. 11.0 p.m.—OUR GREAT THOUGHT: “The m:.n who can say at the end of the day : I*ve tried to be tender to someone cast down, To put a glad smile in the place of a frown • I’ve tried to be good in the old simple way ; I*ve tried %o be helpful and cheery to-day— Is the man who is helping humanity rise Out of things to a beautiful world in the skies.”

11.1 p.m.—THE VAGABONDS. 11.40 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KINO. 3AR, MELBOURNE THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 1928. MORNING NEWS SESSION. 11 a.m. to 12 noon. CONCERT SESSION. 12 noon to 1 p.m. Transmitted from Panatrope House, 252 Collins Street (by exclusive permission of Wills and Paton. Ltd.), on the Brunswick Panatrope. MATINEE SESSION. ORCHESTRAL CONCERT. 2 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. A half-hour Dance Session by Melbeurne’s favorite Dance Band. The latest hits, each one announced prior to its presentation. 2.30 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Suite: “The Shoe Ballet” (Ansell). 2.45 p.m.—Miss Beth Corrie, contralto: “O. Lovely Night” (Landon Ronald). “The Enchantress” (Hatton). 2.53 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Pas des fleurs” (Delibes). “Dreams of Yesterday” (Humphries). “Chant d’Amour” (Frommel). 8.8 p.m.—Miss Beth Corrie, contralto: “Along the Dusty Road” (Simpson). “Advice” (Molly Carew). 3.15 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 3.30 p.m.— Interval announcements. 3.40 p.m—Vr. Ernie Pettifor. “Saxaphene f antasie” (Rosebrook). 3.44 p.m,—Melbourne Concert Orchestra : “Minuten Spiele” (Fetras). “Serenata d’Amalfi” (Becce). 4 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Four.” 4.1 p.m.—Second weather forecast. 4.3 p.m.—Mr. Alan A Icock, entertainer: “Sob Stuff” (Jorda.i). 4.11 p.m.—Ayarz Dansonians. 4.27 p.m.—Mr. Alan Adcock, humorous enter- tainer : “The Syncopated Village Blacksmith” (Weston and Lee). “Imitation of a Street Singer” (Manuscript). 4.35 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Selection: “Merrie England” (Sir Edward German). Suite: “Carnival” (Rirg). 4.55 p.m.—Special Racing Report. Acceptances and Barrier Positions for Saturday’s races, by G.F.R. 5 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Five.” God Save the King. CHILDREN’S SESSION. SONG AND DANCE. 7.15 p.m.—Hobby Session. Mr. A. G Ke’so>, Vice-President of the 3AR Stamp Club. 7.25 p.m.—“Early Victorian History?” Mr. F. A. Currie’s interesting talk this v will deal with “Portland Bay—an Historic Spot: It’s First Settlement.” 7.85 p.m.—Sport Session. “Harlequin” pre- sents his budget of up-to-date news and com- ments on Sport of the Day. 7.50 p.m.—Macnamara’s stock reports, McPhail Anderson’s pig market. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Eight.” 8.1 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Overture: “La Dame Blanche” (Boieldieu’. 8.9 p m. —Miss Ruth Phillips, soprano: “Reeit et Air de Lia” (Debussy). “When All was Young” (Gounod). 8.17 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Rubenstein Poetry” (Urbach). 8.34 p.m.—Mr. Ernie Pettifer, clarinet* “Andante and Polinaise” (La Thiere). 8.38 p.m.—Miss Ruth Phillip? soprano: “Roberts O tu Che Odoro” (Meyerbeev). “Musetta's Song” (La Boheme). 8.46 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Elegie” (Tschaikowsky). 9.51 p.m.—Announcements. 9.3 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Ballet Suite” from Coppelia (Delibes). 9.6 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 9.35 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: Suite: “Cobweb Castle” (Liza Lehmann). 9.50 p.m.—Announcements. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock says “Ten.” 10.1 p.m.—Semi-final weather forecast, speci- ally for our Country Listeners. 10.3 p.m.—Mr. John Hobbs, baritone: “The Blue Men of Minch” (Granoelle Bantock). “Don Juan’s Serenade” (Tschaikowsky). 10.11 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “A Love Suite” (Lake). “Andante” (Golterman). “Romanze” (Tschaikowsky). 10.27 p.m.—Mr. John Hobbs, baritone: “In Summer Time on Bredon” (Graham PeeD. “Admiral’s Broom” (Bevan). 10.36 p.m.—Melbourne Concert Orchestra: “Petite Suite d’Orchentri” (Bizet). 10.45 p.m.—“Harlequin.” Sports results. 10.52 p.m.—’•Ag*' 1 News Bulletin, exclusive to SAR. 10 58 p.m.—Final weather forecast. 10.59 p.m.—Our Australian Good-night quote is taken from “The Knight’s Return,” by C. J. Dennis. 4QG, BRISBANE. THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 1923. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. MIDDAY SESSION. 1 .pm.—Market reports : weather information ; “The Daily Mail” and ‘‘The Daily Standard” news. 1.20 p.m.—A lunch hour address. 1.58 p.m.—Standard time signal. 2 p.m.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3.30 p.m.—Mail train running times. 3.31 p.m.—A programme of music from the studio. 4.15 p.m.—“The Telegraph” news. 4.30 p.m.—Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. ' 6 p.m.—Mail train running times ; ‘‘Daily Standard” news; weather information ; am nouncements. 0.15 p.m.—Dinner music. 6.30 p.m.—Bedtime stories by ‘‘The Sandman.” 7 p.*m.—Special news service ; market reports ; stock reports. 7.30 p.m.—Weather news; announcements; “Daily Standard” news. 7.43 p.m.—Standard time /ignal. 7.45 p.m.—Lecturette, “Our Meat Supply, Mar- ketable and Unmarketable Flesh of Ox and Sheep”—Mr. H. G. Cheeseman (Senior In- spector of Slaughter Houses). NIGHT SESSION. PART I. 8 p.m.—Pianoforte Solo: “Nocturne F-Sharp Major” (Chopin). Soprano Solo.: ‘She Wandered Down the Mountain Side’* (Clay). Miss P. McOnigly. Violin Solo: “Sonata in A” (Handel). Mr. Eric Hayne. Bass Solo: “Viene la mia Vendetta” (Donizetti). Mr. J. E. England. Soprano Solo: “Voi Che Sapete” (Mozart). Miss P. McOnigly. Violin Solo: “Walters Prize Song” (Wagner). Mr. Eric Hayne. Ballad: “Simon the Cellarer” (Hatton). Mr. J. E. England. Piano: “Sonata in C-Sharp Minor” (Beethoven). Soprano Solo: “Elegie” (Massenet). Miss P. McOnigly (violin obligato by Mr. Eric Hayne). Bass Solos: (a) “Eriskay Love Lilt.” (b) “Pulling the Sea Dulse” (M. Kennedy Fraser). Mr. J. E. England. Violin Solo: “Ave Maria” (Schubert-Wilhelmj). Mr. Eric Hayne. Soprano Solo: “Depuis le Jour” .(Charpentier). Miss Pat McOnigly. PART 11. 9 p.m.—An impromptu programme by the Anglo Male Quartette Party. PART 111. 9.30 p.m.—A short programme of specially selected electrically-reproduced records. 10 p.m.—The “Daily Mail” news; Weather news; Close down.


SCL, ADELAIDE THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 1928. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—G.P.O. Chimes. 12 ;- P-^—‘‘ Advertiser ” new s service and Bri- tisn Wireless news. 12.30 p.m.—Popular vocal anl instrumental numbers on the studio “Recreator.” 12.50 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co’s Stock Fv change Intelligence. Ck Ex ’ 12.57 p.m.—Meteorological information. 1 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 1 orchestra numbers on the Studio Recreator. 1.30 p.m.—Selection of Vocal Operatic num bers on the “Recreator.” Um ' 1.57 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 2 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 3.1 p.m.—Dance numbers on the “Recreator.” 3.30 p.m.—Talk: “Dainty ornaments for the Home.” 3.45 p.m.—Cheer-up talk by Rev. C. H. Nield. 4 p.m.—G.P.O.Chimes. 4.1 p.m.—Vocal and Instrumental numbers on the “Recreator.” 4.57 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 6 p.m. G.P.O. Chimes and close down EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 6.1 p.m.—Children’s entertainment by the SCL Radio Family. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music on the Studio “Rec- reator.” 6.50 p.m.—General Market reports by A. W. Sandford and Co., A. E. Hall and Co., Dal- gety and Co., S.A. Farmers Co-operative Union, Taylor Bros., Retail Grocers Asso- ciation, Interstate Fruit and Produce Mar- ket Co., Ltd. 7 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 7.1 p.m.—S. C. Ward and Co.’s Stock Ex- change Intelligence. 7.7 p.m.—Scripture Reading. 7.15 p.m.—Popular Science talk. 7.30 p.m.—Talk “Better Homes” by Slaters (Furnishers) Ltd. 7.40 p.m.—Talk on Poultry by Mr. A. M. Whittenbury. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 8.1 p.m.—Novelty Broadcast. 8.20 p.m.—Selections, Radio Melodians Dance Band. 8.30 p.m.—Vocal recital by Vera Thrush and Harold Gard. 8.40 p.m.—Selections, Radio Melodians. 8.50 p.m.—Recital by Vera Thrush and Harold Gard (continued.) 9 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. .9.1 p.m.—Meteorological information 9.2 pm.—Dalgety’s wheat report. 9.3 p.m.—British Wireless news. 9.14 p.m—Selections, Radio Melodians 9.25 p.m.—Popular songs by Young and Parker. 9.35 p.m.—Selections, Radio Melodians. 9.45 p.m.—Tenor solo. Chas Baggott. 9.52 p.m.—Selections. Radio Melodians. 9.56 p.m.—Tenor solos. Chas Baggott. 10 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes. 10.1 p.m.—“Advertiser” news service. 10.15 p.m.—Selections. Radio Melodians. Maison de Danse, Glenelg. 10.55 p.m.—Friday’s programme and meteoro- logical information. 11 p.m.—G.P.O. Chimes and National Anthem. 7ZL, HOBART THURSDAY, sth APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 11 a m. to 12 noon. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 P.m. —G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 3.1 p.m.—Musical .^election.

    • ■6 I - m - —Hcibart Stock quotations.

Weather information. Items of interest. 3.15 p m . —Selections by 7ZL Studio Trio: Pour la Pampa” (Siciliano). Suite, “In a Persian Garden” (Lehmann). Vales des Slouettes” (Drigo). Violin solo. Selected. Mr. E. J. McCann. '‘Three Dances from Henry VIII” (German), ln Birdland” (Zamecnik). “Valse Premiere Tendretse” (Mmton) 4.15 p.m.—Chat by Child Welfare Nurse.’ 4.30 p.m.—Close down . E/RLY EVENING SESSION. 6.30 p.m.—Uncle Hector’s corner. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Musical selection. 7.35 p.m.—Talk by Mr. G.’ F. Davis “Tas- mania’s Reafforestation Developments.” 7.50 p.m.—Mercury special Tasmanian news service. Railway auction produce sales Weather forecasts. Hobart Stock Exchange quotations. 8 p.m.—G.P.O. Clock chimes the hour. 8.1 p.m.—Selections by Hobart Municipal Band. Conductor, Mr. L. M. Barnett. 9.40 p.m.—British Official Wireless news. 9.50 p.m.—Mercury special Interstate nows service. Ships within wireless range. Tas- manian District Weather reports. 9 p.m. Weather forecasts. Weather reports, from Australian Capital cities Station announce- ments. Friday’s programme. 10 p.m.—Close down. Friday, April, 6 2FC, SYDNEY MORNING SESSION. 11 a.m.—“Big Ben” and programme announce- ments. 11.5 a.m.—Studio music and news service. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben.” Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2-45 p.m.—Programme announcements. 2.50 p.m.—A record recital of Easter music. 3.45 p.m.—From the Capitol Theatre, Sydney. Items by Mr. Scholl, at the Wurlitzer Organ, with a description of how the various effects are obtained. 4.30 p.m.—From the Studio: Musical items and news. 4.45 p.m.—Close down. EVENING SESSION. 7 p.m.—"Big Ben” and announcements. 7.2 p.m.—From St. Mark’s Church of England, Darling Point: Stainer’s “Crucifixion,” rendered by the Choir. 8 p.m.—“Big Ben.” From the Lyceum Hall, Pitt Street, Sydney (by arrangement with the Central Methodist Mission), a pro- gramme supplied by 2FC. The New South Wales Tramway Band. 8.7 p.m.—Sydney Calland, baritone: “The Floral Dance.” 8.15 p.m.—JOYCE FOREMAN, elocutionist: What I See & Hear WE DISAGREE. Young Bill s idea of a “good show’ 1 consists of roasted peanuts, hurdy- gurdies, a fat lady, and a punching match. He recently -retailed with glee how the Battling Buster bust digger Jones “into a plate of mince- meat.” I am still in doubt whether the negroid Jones fell into the plate or whether he used it as a substitute tor his razor. My wife’s vision is more expen- sive and expansive. She imagines a tront row in the stalls, a box of sweets, fur on her neck and sleeves, and silken what-me-nots. For me—the Radio Show! Man! It’s the best eye-opener since the hobble skirt. Take, for instance, the stall of New System Telephones, Pty. Their new de-luxe model of an electric-run receiver is as big a sensa- tion as the second lot of triplets in a poor family. When I saw that set, I thanked my lucky star that my wife didn’t. It’s harder to get a woman past a pretty piece of furniture than over the age of thirty-nine. Besides, no female can resist press- ing a button. Even the Queen of Afghanistan, according to cables, stood enthralled before a sample of English engineering which washed the dishes and fed the fowls to the touch of electric controls. Another button-pressing product of New Systems is the Acme Socket Power—a sort of permanent power- producer that works forty-four hours a week or more with never a crackle. Besides giving perfect results, it should act as a shining example to I.W.W.’s and other Captains of In- dustry. A new face on the Stand belongs to a big “A” Battery of bull-dog breed, Fuller power, pep, and real ebonite cells. « * s our P a l> the Phil co “B,” its glass cells and mahogany case as shining and pretty as a day in Spring. For good looks and ser- vice all the year round, the Philco is only rivalled by its own Distribu- tors. Close by is that King of Adven- turers, the Burgess, with its black- and-white-striped halo of honest achievement. An Aristocrat of dry batteries, it fills a democratic need— there’s a type for every kind of set, be it ever so humble or proud. Taken all round, this stand is as chock-a-block with promise as a bud- ding M.P. And there’s no catch. Be- tween you and me, every New System product is a true-blue friend.*


8.20 p.m.—Rosina Madell, soprano: “The Lord is My Light” (Allitsen). 8.28 p.m. The N.S.W. Tramway Band' 8.39 p.m.—Peggy Dunbar, contralto: (a) “Beyond the Dawn” (Sanderson). (b) “My Treasure” ('£rtvalsa). 8.47 p.m.—Henri Penn pianoforte 6olos: (a) “Prelude in C” (Bach). (b) “Alla Turca” (Mozart). (c) “Musical Box” (Pouishneff). (d) “Humoreske” (Levine). 8.59 p.m.—The Bennett North Vocal Quar- tette : (a) “Sleep, Gentle Lady” (Bishop). (b) “O, Peaceful Night” (German) 9.5 p.m.—From the Studio: During the interval at the Lyceum, news items will be givejj. 9.10 p.m.—From the Lyceum Hall, Pitt-street: Continuation of the Concert by 2FC artists! The N.S.W. Tramway Band: Group of Hymn tunes. 9.16 p.m.—Sydney Calland, baritone: “My Ships” (Barrett). 9.22 p.m.—Joyce Foreman, elocutionist: 9.26 p.m.--The N.S.W. Tramway Band. 9.32 p.m.—Rosina Madell, soprano: “The Dream of Home” (Arditti). f. 37 p.m.—Henri Penn, pianoforte solos: (a) “Air and Tambourin’’ (Benjamin). (b) “Romance” (Sapelnikoff). (c) “Ta ran telle” (Nicode). f. 50 p.m.—Peggy Dunbar, contralto: (a) O Night of Stars" (Thompson). (b) “Coming Home” (Willeby). §.58 p.m.—The Bennett North Vocal Quar- tette : (a) “In this Hour” (Pinsuti). (b) “When Hands Meet” (Pinsuti). 10.4 p.m.—The N.S.W. Tramway Band; Selection. 10.15 p.m.—National Anthem. C'ose down. 3LO, MELBOURNE. FRIDAY, 6th APRIL, 1928. MORNING SESSION. 10.30 a.m.—Express train information. An- nouncements. 10.45 a.m. MORNING SERVICE FROM ST. PAUL’S CATHEDRAL: Sentence. Exhortation. General Confession. The Absolution. The Lord's Prayer. Psalm 22. First Lesson. Te Deum. Second Lesson. Benedictus. The Apostles’ Creed. The Collects. The Anthem, “Come Unto Him” (Gounod). Prayers. Hymn (A. and M.), 332, “There is a Green Hill Far Away.” Sermon, The Precentor. Hymn 108, "When 1 Survey the Wondrous Cross.” The Benediction. Being Good Friday, the service will be of a quiet character; only the Psalm, Anthem and Hymns will be sung. 12 noon.—Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. B p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “Mendelssohn’s Melodies.” 8.10 p.m.—ISOBEL BIDDELL, contralto: “O Rest in the Lord” —Elijah (Mendelssohn) “Jesus of Nazareth—King” (Handel). 3.17 p.m.—BESSIE GAUNSON, violin, and BERTHA JORGENSEN, violin: “Slow Move- ment Bach Double Concerto for Two Strings.” 3.25 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone : Rec’t., “I Feel the Deity Within.” (Handel). Aria, “Arm, Arm, Ye Brave.” 3.32 ixm..—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “String Quartette” (Mozart). 3.42 p.m.—HELGA BRENNICKE, ’Cello: “Kol Nidrei” (Max gruch). 3.50 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S TRIO: “Trio” (Beethoven). 4 p.m.—ISOBEL BIDDELL, contralto: “There is a Green Hill Far Away” (Gounod) “Easter Hymn” (Frank Bridge). 4.7 p.m.—AGNES FORTUNE: Selection (Chopin). 4.17 p.m.—COLIN THOMSON, tenor! “Onaway, Awake Beloved” (Coleridge- Taylor). “The Shepherdess” (Macmurrough). 4.24 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “Easter Fantasia” (Lake). 4.30 p.m.—J. ALEXANDER BROWNE, bari- tone : “The Threshold” (Kennedy Russell). “Vale” (Kennedy Russell). 4.37 p.m.—THE SHRINE OF REMEM- BRANCE.—The movement for the erection of a Shrine of Remembrance to our soldiers, is one that should awaken thoughts of those dark days through which we passed when we had our backs to the wall in a grim struggle for the safety and security of the Empire and for the maintenance of civilisa- tion.—The Lord Mayor of Melbourne (Sir Stephen Morell). 4.38 p.m.—DOROTHY ROXBURGH, violas “Rondeau” (Stanitz). 4.45 p.m.—GOLIN THOMSON, tenor* “The Prize Song,” the Meistersingera (Wagner). “Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal” (Quilter). 4.50 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “String Quartette”—Andante (Dittersdorf). 5 p.m.—Close down. ( EVENING SESSION. 6 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings by “BILLY BUNNY.” C. 20 p m.-CAPT. DONALD MacLEAN will talk to Young Australians on s “Choice and Destiny.” 6.35 p.m.—Musical interlude. G. 40 p.m.—“BILLY BUNNY”: Stories of the Australian. Bush.** NIGHT SESSION. 7 p.m.—Organ recital from Scots Church— MANSLEY GREER. Suite Gothique (Boellmann). 1. Chorale. 2. Minuet Gothique. 3. Priere a Notre Dame. 4. Toccata. Prayer and Cradle Song (Guilman). Offertoire in D flat (Salome). Short Prelude and Fugue in B flat (Bach). BRASS BAND MUSIC. 7.30 p.m —COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ BAND: Sacred March, “Lord of Kings.** Cornet Solo, “‘Abide with Me.” 7.40 p.m.—J. HOWARD KING, baritone: “Within These Sacred Bowers” (Mozart). -7.47 p.m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ BAND: Overture, “The Golden Sceptre.” 7.57 p.m.—ISOBEL BIDDELL, contralto* “Woe Unto Them”—Elijah* (Mendelssohn). “Ave Maria” (Schubert). 8.4 p.m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS’ Sacred Ballade, “The Holy City.” “The Rosary.” 8.14 p.m.—J. OWARD KING, baritone: “Lord God of AbYaham” (“Elijah”— Mendelssohn.) , 8.21 p.m.—COLLINGWOOD CITIZENS* BAND: Hymns: “Jesus Lover of My Soul.” “Nearer My God to Thee.” 8.26 p.m.—ISOBEL BIDDELL contralto j “The Heart Worships” (Holst). “Yonder” (Oliver). STRING QUARTETTE AND VOCAL ITEMS. 8.33 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: “Overture” (Haydn). WESLEY CHURCH CHOIR (Conduct, Wm. G. JamesX^ Hymns. SAFFO ARNAV, soprano: “Ave Maria” (Gounod). (With violin obligato by Bertha Jorgensen.) WESLEY CHURCH CHOIR: “Give ear unto My Prayer” (Arcadelt). “Lead, Kindly Light” (Buck). AGNES FORTUNE: i “Prelude” (Chopin). A. BOSSENCE: “Song of Penitence” (Beethoven). \ BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUARTETTE: Quartette (Beethoven). , WESLEY CHURCH CHOIR: * “Hear My Prayer” (Mendelssohn). Soloist, Saffo Arnav, soprano. BERTHA JORGENSEN, violin: Slow movement from Mendelssohn Con* certo. A. BOSSENCE: “O Glorious Night” (Bach). “The Knight of Bethlehem” (Thomson). PIANO QUINTETTE (Schumann). Agnes Fortune and Bertha Jorgensen’s Quartette. 10 p.m.—Meteorological information. Announcements. OUR GREAT THOUGHT: THE SHRINE OF REMEMBRANCE. “We talk of Remembrance. Let us act our lives as if we ourselves really were making some sacrifice in remembrance of the great sacrifice made by the brave men who went forth to war during those terrible five years. It is our duty to continuously do some personal deed of sacrifice lest we forget what we owe, not only to those who gave their lives, but the vast numbers who came back permanently injured and all who did THEIR duty. It OUR duty to raise a monument so that our children and children’s children will preserve a reveren- tial feeling of remembrance of what they also owe to the men who did such noble deeds to make the foundation of liberty and civilisation more secure.”—Mr. Goerge Swinburne. 10.5 p.m.—GOD SAVE THE KING. Saturday, April 7 2FC, SYDNEY. holiday programme. 10 a.m. to 11.30 a.m. MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon.—“ Big Ben” and announcements. 12.5 p.m.—Studio music. 12.20 p.m.—“Sydney Morning Herald” news. 12.30 p.m.—Rugby Wireless news. 12.35 p.m.—Studio music. 1 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Weather intelligence. 1.3 p.m.—“Evening News” midday news service. 1.20 p.m.—Studio music. 2 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. AFTERNOON SESSION. 3 p.m.—“Big Ben” and announcements. 3.2 p.m.—The “Smart Set” Instrumental Tr>« Popular numbers. 3.12 p.m.—Peggy Shaw, soubrette. 3.18 p.m.—Jack Wright, novelty pianist. 3.25 p.m.—John F. Dean, entertainer.


NOT A LUXURY BUT A NECESSITY OF LIFE All our sets are built and designed on this principle. They therefore deserve the name given to them by the public itself. Loewe Popular Sets You get a perfect set operating without disturbanpe, consuming en a minimum of current, and one that can be handled even by a child. Ask your Radio dealer to demon- strate one of outr sets—there is no obligation on your part. r 4, Fountayne Road, Tottenham, London, N 17 ■■■■■■■■■■■■■mmmm The Wonder j TE-KA-DE j 1 VALVE I SET | I guarantee full loud speaker ; reception on the T.K.D. 1 valve : set on all local stations. • Set and Valve £7/10/- 1 Complete, with Batteries and > Speaker, from £lO/10/- jj If you want to build this set • yourself, I can supply all acces- jj sories, circuit, valve, and help • you. ; G. Beardsmore j Ist Floor, Kincoppal Chas. \ 38 Martin Place, : City. : 'Phone: 81773. [ 3.35 p.m.—From The Ambassadors : The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra, conducted by A 1 Hammeu 3.50 pm.—From the Studio: Peggy Shaw, soulrette. 3.55 p.m.—The “Smart Set” Instrumental Trio Popular numbers. 4.5 p.m.—John F. Dean, entertainer. 4.10 p.m.—From The Ambassadors: The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra. 4.25 p.m.—From the Studio: Peggy Shaw, soubrette. 4.30 p.m.—Jack Wright, novelty pianist. 4.40 p.m.—The “Smart Set” Instrumental Trio 4.50 p.m.—Racing and Sporting resume. 5 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Close down. EARLY EVENING SESSION. 5.40 p.m.—The Chimes of 2FC. 5.45 p.m.—The “Hello Man” talks to th*. children. 6.15 p.m.—Story time for the young folk. 6.30 p.m.—Dinner music 7 p.m. “Big Ben.” Late sporting infor- mation. 7.15 p.m.—Weather intelligence. 7.18 p.m. “Evening News” late news service. 7.28 p.m.— : Studio music. EVENING SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—Programme announcements. 7.35 p.m.—“A Street Scene in Sydney.” 7.45 p.m.—lntroductory remarks and a descrip- tion of the new “Capitol” Theatre. 8 p.m.—“Big Ben.” Broadcast for the first time from the Capitol Theatre. The “Capitol” Symphony Orchestra of 32 players, will play the prologue, followed by Mr. Scholl, at the Wurlitzer Organ. Items by Ted Henkel and his Stage Band of 20 players. A Vocal Quartette wilk sing several num- bers in association with the Stage Pro- logue. 9.5 p.m.—From the Studio: Late weather forecast. 9.6 p.m.—Virginia Bassetti, contralto 9.13 p.m.—From The Ambassadors : Dance music by the Ambassadors Orches- tra, conducted by A 1 Hammet, 9.20 p.m.—Fraser Coss, baritone. 9.28 p.m.—Douglas McKinnon, concertina items. 9.33 p.m.—James Donnelly, tenor; College songs. 9.40 p.m.—From The Ambassadors : The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra, conduc- tor, A 1 Hammet. 9.48 p.m.—Virginia Bassetti, contralto, f. 55 p.m.—From The Ambassadors : Dance music. 10.2 p.m.—Fraser Coss, baritone—From the Studio. 10.8 p.m.—From The Ambassador?: The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra. 10.18 p.m.—From the Studio: James Donnelly, tenor. 10.24 p.m.—Douglas McKinnon: Concertina numbers. 10.30 p.m.—From The Ambassadors : Dance music. 10.38 p.m.—From the Studio: Late weather forecast. 10.89 p.m.—The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra 10.57 p.m.—From the Studio: To-morrow’s programme and late news. 11 p.m.—“Big Ben.” The Ambassadors Dance Orchestra. 11.45 p.m.—National Anthem. Close down. 3LO, MELBOURNE. SATURDAY, 7th APRIL, 1928. EARLY BORNING SESSION. 7 Jerk? 1 ’ -^322 Jingles for the Gymnastic 7.20 a.m —Physical Culture Exercise (to the Jazz Jingles). 7.33 a.m.—Weather forecasts for all States. <•4O a.m.—News. 8 a.m.—Melbourne Observatory Time Signal. a.m.—Jazz Jingles. ®’ s *: m -~ NEWs - Sporting information. Shipping, Stock Exchange information. 8.13 a.m.—Jazz Jingles. 8.15 a.m.—Close down. MORNING SESSION, 11 a.m.—THE STATION ORCESTRA: A Musical Switch” (Alford). 11.10 a.m.—ETHEL MULLER, contralto: Just a Ray of Sunlight” (Squire). “My Message” (D’Hardelot). 11.17 a.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Selection. “San Toy” (Sid Jones), r ox-trot, “Drifting and Dreaming” (Schneider). 11 -RATHLEEN NICHOLS, soprano: The Carnival” (J. Molloy). „ 3 he Dawn h as a Song” (M. Phillips). 11.82a.rn.-THE STATION ORCHESTRA- Three Arabian Dances” (Mont Ring) 11.45 a.m.—ETHEL MULLER, contralto: If Any Little Song of Mine” (Del RiegoW Come, for it’s June” (Dorothy Forster). 11 ; 52 p.m.— THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Floods of Spring” (Rachmaninoff). Rescuendo” (Soro). MIDDAY SESSION. 12 noon. British Official Wireless news from Rugby. Reuter’s and The Australian Press Association cables. “Argus” news service. Announcements. Description of PENNANT CRICKET—FinaIs. 12.20 p.m—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Three Dances from “The Rebel Maid.” 12.30 p.m.—KATHLEEN NICHOLS, soprano: “Ave Maria” (Millard). “The Lilac Tree” (Millard). 12.37 p.m.—THE SHRINE OF REMEM- BRANCE: “To the great army of men whose com- radeship is a sweet momory ; to the host of Victorian men and women who have borne With fortf?hde and proud suffering the loss of dear sons, fathers, brothers, relatives and friends, and to all who served their country in time of war, and found pleasure in the serving and compensation in the sacrifice, we stretch forth our hands in an appeal, and in assurance that there shall be set up in eternal stone a link with the Great War to retain for the Commonwealth, and for future generations, an appreciation of the freedom so dearly bought. “Returned Soldiers—the Memorial will commemorate the self-denial of your womenfolk, the sacrifice of a comrade who did not return—make your offering help to build a mark of the nation’s gratitude, that when the last of the A.I.F. has passed over there shall yet remain as a legacy the memory of a great name, and the inherit- ance of a great example.” G. N. S. CAMPBELL, Organising Secretary. National War Memorial Committee. 12.40 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Valse Pathetique” (Baron). 12.47 p.m.—FRANK and FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet n “Akaki Oi.” Song, “A Song to Hawaii." Steel Guitar, “Hawaiian Hotel.” Duet, “My Sweet Hawaiian Hula Girl.” 1 p.m.—Melbourne Observatory Time Signal.


12 ISSUES DELIVERED POST FREE for one year “RADIO” is the only reliable and up-to-date technical wireless journal in Australia. Latest amateur experimenter news, short stories, topical articles. Finely printed, profusely illustrated. IN AUSTRALIA & NEW, ZEALAND LacorporatJaQ Lasd fteiAir* SUBSCRIPTION FORM To the Editor “Radio,” 51 Castlereagh Street, Sydney. Please forward “Radio” for a period of for which I enclose for (Add Exchange to Country Cheques.) Name Address Subscription Rates: 12 months (12 issues), 13/- post free; 6 months (6 issues), 6/6 post free. 52 ISSUES DELIVERED POST FREE for one year 1 “WIRELESS WEEKLY’’ gives you the complete broadcasting programmes from every important sta- tion in Australia, a week :n advance, in addition to topical news and articles and a technical construc- tive article by a qualified radio man. r D SUBSCRIPTION FORM To the Editor, “Wireless Weekly,’' 51 Castlereagh Street, Sydney. Please forward “Wireless Weekly’’ for a period' of for which I enclose for (Add exchange to Country Cheques.) Name Address Subscription Rates: 12 months (£>2 issues), 13/- post free; 6 months (26 issues), 6/6 post free.


Manufacturers Products Pty. Ltd. IMPORTED SETS Agents for all Styles of Radi Products, including Clyde Batterie ARMAX BATTERIES Elec. Meter Mfg. Co. “Emmco” Renrade Condensers, Leaks. ASTOR SETS G & R SETS Airzone Coils and Loops. BALDWIN SPEAKERS Neutron Crystals Prompt shipments from Sydney Surplus Stocks sold Interstate. H. J. HAPGOOD Challis House, Martin Place SYDNEY Tel.: BW 1328 1.1 p.m.—OUR FRIEND FROM THE WAL- LABY TRACK has just called in, and will entertain you with some of the songs he sings as he jogs along the roads that* lead to anywhere. “Dear Little Shamrock.” “Three fc.‘ Jack” (Squire). 1.6 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRICKET —Finals. 1.16 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: Suite, “Othello” (Coleridge-Taylor). 1.25 p.m.—OUR FRIEND OF THE WAL- LABY TRACK will now give another couple of songs before the returns to the broad highways again—- “You Along O’ Me” (Sanderson). “Only the River Running By” (Hopkins). 1.32 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA- Selection, “The Street Singer” (Simmson). 2 p.m.—Under the auspices of the National Safety Council, Cr. W. TURNER, Represen- tative of the Trades Hall, will speak on “Safety First.” 2.10 p.m.—Description of Stawell Athletic Club Sports from Central Park, Stawell. AFTERNOON SESSION. 2.20 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRIC- KET—FinaIs. 2.30 p.m.—Description of Doncaster Handicap (A.J.C. Meeting at Randwick Racecourse, Sydney), one mile, transmitted from Rand- wick Racecourse. 2.36 p.m.—Result of Hurdle Race, two miles, from SATnDOWN PARK RACES. 2.37 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Dance Music.” 2.47 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRIC- KET—FinaIs. 3 p.m.—Description of Two-Year-Old Handi- cap, five furlongs, SANDOWN PARK RACES. 3.5 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Comic Opera.” 3.15 p.m.—Description of Istawell Athletic Club Sports, described from Central Park, STAWELL. 3.20 p.m.—Description of Sandown Plate, six furlongs, SANDOWN PARK RACES. 3.35 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Marches.” 3.50 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRIC- KET—FinaIs. 4 p.m.—Descripton of Sandown Park Han- dicap, I*4 mles, SANDOWN PARK Races. 4.5 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Foxtrots.” 4.15 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRIC- KET—FinaIs. 4. 30 p.m.—Description of Sandown Purse, 1 mile, SANDOWN PARK RACES. 4.35 p.m.—JOHNSTON’S STUDIO BOYS: Selection, “Grand Opera.” 4.45 p.m.—Weather reports. 4.46 p.m.—Description of PENNANT CRIC- KET—FinaIs. 5 p.m.—Description of Trial Welter, 1 mile, SANDOWN PARK RACES. 5.5 p.m.—"Herald” news service. Stock Ex- change information. Sporting results. 5.15 p.m.—Close down. During the afternoon the results of the A.J.C. Races at Randwick and of Kerang Races will be given as they come to hand. EVENING SESSION. 5.50 pjn.—Stumps Cricket. Sporting results. 6 p.m.—Answers to Letters and Birthday Greetings by “LITTLE MISS KOOKA- BURRA.” 6.20 p.m.—Musical interlude. 6 ' 2 n 5 u P ' n ?'~^ DICKSON GREGORY: 1 .%u ri^ aI of Australia’s first steamship— The Sophia Jane.” 6.40 p.m. ‘‘LITTLE MISS KOOKABURRA”: An Easter Story—-Mrs. Blaekie’s chickens seeing the world,” and “An Impromptu Performance of Rollo.” NEWS AND MARKET REPORTS. 7 resultsf tUmpS ’ Pennant Cricket. Sporting 7 'sySo r^r ,,H Qu- ,d ’’ news service - Weather synopsis. Shipping movements. 7.12 p.m.—Stock Exchange information. 7.17 p.m.—River reports. 7 Producpt^ a^ et reports by the Victorian .Train T Go-operative Co., Ltd.—Poultry, by - . straw > Jute, dairy produce, Fruß hv ti n ° nions - Market reports of tion p f Y lctonan Fruiterers’ Associa- F^7 R K etai u Pn £ S - Wholesale prices of f "J. *\ y th * Wholesale Fruit Merchants* Association. Citrus fruit. NIGHT SESSION. 7.30 p.m.—EDWARD E. PESCOTT: ‘‘Australian Pen Shaped Flowers’* 7.45 p.m.—COLONEL POTTINGER : Asiatic Problems affecting Australia. Present Situations in India. OLD IRISH FOLK SONGS AND LEGENDS. 8 p.m.—BESSIE GAUNSON, violin: The Last Rose of Summer.” ‘‘St. Patrick’s Day.” 8.10 p.m.—LILLIAN STOTT, soprano: ‘‘l know where I‘m goin‘” "The Spartan Mother’s Lullaby.” “B for Barney,” an Irish Fragment. 8.17 p.m.—BESSIE GAUNSON, violin: ‘‘The Wearing of the Green.” ‘‘Garry Owen.” 8.25 p.m.—WILLIAM TAINSH, Elocutionist. Two Irish Stories. ‘‘The Settling of the Verse.” ‘‘lvy Leaves.” 8.40 p.m.—BERTHA JORGENSEN’S QUAR- TETTE : ‘‘lrish Tunes from County Derry” (Grain- ger). 8.50 p.m.—LILIAN STOTT, soprano: ‘‘Slow by the Shadows.” ‘‘l Wish I had the Shepherd’s Lamb.” OF INTEREST TO ALL CYCLISTS. 8.57 p.m.—Description of events at the Moto- drome, by “Olympus.” A TUNEFUL TIME. FROM THE STUDIO 9.7 p.m.—THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Ballroom Memories” (Arch Joyce). 9.17 p.m.—FRANK and FRANCIS LUIZ: Duet, “Miliana-e” Steel Guitar, “Hawaiian Love.” Song, “Me and My Shadow.” Duet, “Aloha, Baby BoBy.” 9.30 p.m.—Description of to-night’s Stadium events, by PERCY TAYLOR. At the con- clusion of the match, MR. TAYLOR will give a resume. MINGLED MELODIES. FROM THE STUDIO* 10 p.m.—Weather report. THE STATION ORCHESTRA: “Russian Rural Scene.” “Morish Serenade.” 10 i? *- m -.7-?Y R FRIEND THE HOBO, in his si°ng" aile/ I® 05 h The Westinghouse “REC-TOX” Battery Charger £5-10-0 Made by "WESTINGHOUSE” incorporating new Rectifying principle. ABSOLUTELY DRY— No acid or bulb to replace. REQUIRES NO ATTENTION— No vibrating parts to get out of order. LIFE OF RECTIFYING ELEMENT practically unlimited. OBTAINABLE FROM ALL RADIO DEALERS. —- —' LA WRITE TO-DAY Amalgamated Wireless (A/sia) Ltd. 47 York St., Sydney. Please send me your illustrated folder on Rectox Trickle Chargers. Name ..... Address REC-TOX TRICKLE CHARGER ftfanofactu'-rd b Y WESTING HOUSE ELECTRIC | » 0 0 rang


Natural Tone Each musical instrument retains its characteristics, each voice its individuality. There is no unnatural accentuation of the treble, no deliberate emphasis of the bass, no artificial “ sharpness ” or mellowness in the new AMPLION CONE SPEAKER just a natural rendering of notes and tones. The AMPLION Cone has the following outstanding features: —

  • 1 An adjustable unit of improved type,

remarkably sensitive and efficient,* yet robust. •I A cone diaphragm made, not of paper, but of strong seamless material, acoustically correct, and entirely im- pervious to changes in temperature and climate—a vital point. A system of construction which pos- sesses all the qualities inherent to cone speakers without any of the common defects, thus affording ex- traordinarily lifelike and natural results.

  • 1 A carefully considered and well-

balanced design such as to eliminate the necessity for a special amplifier; in effect the AMPLION CONE gives —on any ordinary receiving set remarkable fidelity in reproduction. “ Chippendale Mahogany ” Model AC 9 £9-0-0 Other AMPLION Models from 25/- British and Best Advertisement of Amplion (Australasia), Limited, Sydney and Melbourne.