History of wireless telegraphy and broadcasting in Australia/Topical/Biographies/George Henry Boundy/Notes


George Henry Boundy - Transcriptions and notes

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Non-chronological material and key article copies

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Farewell to Boundy at Malmsbury as he departs for Qld

MALMSBURY. (From our own correspondent.) November 1. PRESENTATION TO MR. G. H. BOUNDY. A very pleasant affair came off on Friday night at the National Hotel — a presentation to Mr G. H. Boundy, who during the last four years has acted as telegraph operator at the post-office here; and who by his courteous and obliging conduct has won the golden opinions of the inhabitants generally. He has obtained a similar appointment in Queensland. The occasion of the presentation was very hurriedly arranged. About 20 ladies and gentlemen were present. The Mayor was voted to the chair, and explained the object of the gathering to be taking farewell of their young friend, and making a small presentation to him. Mr I. L. French said he was greatly pleased to have the opportunity of publicly expressing the pleasure he felt in presenting Mr Boundy with a small token of the respect and esteem in which he was held by those he was about to leave. Mr Boundy's character had been most exemplary, and a pattern to the young men of the place. His courteous bearing, and obliging manner, had won the esteem of every one. He (Mr French) felt all the more pride in speaking thus as Mr Boundy was a native of the place, and in presenting him with a testimonial : subscribed for by all classes, and with regard to which there had not been a single refusal. A much larger sum could have been obtained had time permitted, and probably the presentation would have taken another form. A short address had been prepared, which he handed to Mr Boundy with a purse of sovereigns, with the hope that they would prove useful to him, and be a memento of his career at Malmsbury. The address read as follows:—"Malmsbury, Colony of Victoria, 29th October, 1886 — To Mr George Henry Boundy — Dear Sir,— On the eve of your departure from this place, where you have during the past four years occupied the position of telegraph operator and messenger, and being about to proceed to Queensland in a similar.capacity, we herewith present you with a small purse of sovereigns in appreciation of the excellent character you have borne, and especially for your courtesy and obliging conduct at all times when in the discharge of your duties. We are sure that in your new sphere you will maintain these good qualities, and we trust that you will live to enjoy a career of usefulness that is open to you in the rising colony to which you are now going. — We are, Dear Sir, yours faithfully," (Here follow the names of the subscribers with the amounts subscribed, the total being about £17.) After a few words from Mr Adamson expressive of the pleasure it afforded him to be able to speak in such high terms of one of the Malmsbury youths. Mr Boundy responded, regretting his inability to find words suitable to enable him to convey his heartfelt thanks for the kindness shown him. He trusted those present would accept as sincere whatever he was able to give expression to by way of thanks to all who had shown such a warm interest him, by contributing to the handsome gift and the tribute accompanying it. He would value it highly, and it would ever be an inducement to him to continue on the same path he had marked out while living in Malmsbury. In conclusion, he once more expressed his thanks for the.great kindness shown to him. The address was handsomely bound in maroon velvet, the work of Mrs French, and was greatly admired. After drinking Mr Boundy's health with musical honors, and wishing him bon voyage, the proceedings terminated.[1]

Boundy retires at age 65

FAREWELL SOCIAL. Postal Officers Retire. Messrs. G. Bolton, G. H. Boundy, and M. H. Tait, officers of the General Post Office in Brisbane, who are retiring, after nearly 50 years' service, were tendered a farewell by officials of the telegraph and engineering staffs at the Postal Institute on Saturday evening. More than 100 members of the department and their friends attended, and the Acting Deputy Director of Posts and Telegraphs (Mr. F. W. Arnold) presented to each of the retiring officers an upholstered easy chair. Mr. S. J. Wilcox (Superintendent of Telegraphs) presided. He referred to the lengthy services of the three men and regretted their departure from the service. They would be difficult to replace, he said, and certainly none commanded more respect than they. Tributes also were paid by Messrs. H. R. Moore (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), C. E. Sandercock (Telegraphic Engineer), M. P. D. Healy (Supervisor of Telegraphs), M. Twomey (president of the Telegraphists' Union), and C. H. Fuelling (secretary of the Telegraphists' Union). Mr. Bolton, who was Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs, joined the service in 1881, and Mr. Boundy (Testing Officer) two years later. Mr. Tait, who was also a Testing Officer, was transferred from the Railway Department in 1885. He was appointed Supervisor of Traffic in 1922 and Supervisor of Testing in 1926. During the evening an entertaining programme was provided by Miss Jessie Lees and Messrs. Bob Crosby. E. Woods, F. Ryland, J. Dean, and J. Macgregor. Accompaniments were played by Miss Eileen Healy.[2]

As previous

PERSONAL. . . . A farwell social was tendered in the Postal Institute on Saturday evening to Messrs. G. Boulton (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), G. H. Boundy, and M. H. Tait (testing officers), who are retiring from the service on attaining the age limit of 65 years. Mr. S. J. Wilcox (Superintendent of Telegraphs) presided over a large gathering, and on behalf of the members, presented the retiring officers each with an armchair. Speeches were also made by Messrs. H. R. Moore (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), C. E. Sandercock (telegraph engineer), N. P. D. Healy (supervisor), M. Twomey; and C. H. Fuelling, and the guests made a suitable response. Musical items were contributed by Miss Jessie Lees, and Messrs. R. Crosby, J. Dean, and J. Macgregor. Miss Eileen Healy acted as pianiste, and Mr. J. Dean as master of ceremonies.[3]

Brief obituary for Boundy

OBITUARY. MR. G. H. BOUNDY. It will be learned with regret by a wide circle of friends that Mr. G. H. Boundy, of Rockbourne-terrace, Upper Paddington, died early on Wednesday morning in a private hospital in Melbourne. The late gentleman came to Queensland in 1886 and joined the Postmaster-General's De-partment. After a few years in Bo-wen he was transferred to Brisbane where he was stationed until his re-tirement under the age limit last Oc-tober. Mr. Boundy was for many years testing officer in the Chief Telegraph Office, in Brisbane, and acted as as-sistant superintendent upon more than one occasion. He was esteemed by the department as a capable and trustworthy officer. Mr. Boundy was for a long time a church warden and treasurer of Christ Church, Milton. He is survived by his widow and daughter, Joyce (who are at present in Melbourne) and two sons, Roy and Noel.[4]

As previous

Mr. G. H. Boundy. Mr. G. H. Boundy, of Rockbourne Terrace, Upper Paddington, died early on Wednesday morning in a private hospital in Melbourne. With his wife and son, Noel, he went to Victoria about six weeks ago on a visit, and became ill soon after arrival. He underwent a serious operation, but failed to recover. The late Mr. Boundy came to Queensland in 1886, and joined the Postmaster-General's Department. After a few years in Bowen he was transferred to Brisbane, where he was stationed until his retirement under the age limit last October. Mr. Boundy was for many years testing officer in the Chief Telegraph Office, in Brisbane, and acted as assistant superintendent on more than one occasion. He was much liked by his fellows, and esteemed by the Department as a capable and trustworthy officer. He was for a long time a church warden and treasurer of Christ Church, Milton. He is survived by his widow and daughter, Joyce (who are at present in Melbourne), and two sons, Roy and Noel.[5]

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Brief mention of Boundy's father's role in discovery of gold in Victoria

THE FIRST DISCOVERY OF GOLD IN VICTORIA. In a lecture on this subject at Kyneton, on Wednesday evening last, Mr. Tucker, M.L.A., made the following statements, as reported in the Guardian:- "He arrived in the colony in the year 1842, and resided on the Plenty River, not far from the present Yan Yean reservoir. Shortly after being there he fell in with an old hand who showed him some kind of stone or hard earth which he said contained gold. It was however, scarcely visible, but after looking at it carefully he thought he saw some specks something like gold. After this he went to reside near Ararat, where he fell in with a man named Johnson, who used to go about like a hermit, and it was fancied by people he was finding gold, and he had offered him, if he gave him money, to show where it was found, but it was not in his power then to give money. In 1847, some men were sent out from England, among whom was one named Chapman. This man discovered a lump of gold, took it to Melbourne, and sold it to a person named Chas. Bretenna (who was then living in Collins-street) for £20. The same lump was worth four times the amount, but of course Chapman did not know its value, and thought himself lucky to get what he did for it. This piece of gold was publicly exhibited, and he (Mr. Tucker) had frequently handled it. Shortly after this, Chapman went away to Sydney, and was never again heard of. A mate of Chapman's, however, came in contact with him (Mr. Tucker) by accident and he was frequently talking about the lump of gold sold to Bretenna. He was also constantly saying, 'If you only knew what you were walking upon, you would soon have sufficient gold to buy all Europe.' Very little notice was taken of this, as it was thought he was not right in his mind. Having, however, on one occasion, began to talk more than ever about gold, and having opened his swag, he took out a piece of gold rather more than a quarter of an ounce, and said there was plenty of it to be found. There was no mistake as to the gold now, and upon being further questioned, he admitted being a mate of Chapman's, but that he had agreed not to divulge the secret until he saw him again, or until after a certain time. This man, however, soon after left, but a deep impression was made upon himself, and for some time he could think of nothing else but this gold and where to find it. In 1848, parties in Melbourne, from hearing of the gold in possession of Bretenna, began to fancy gold was to be found at the Pyrennees, and many actually came up and began to dig for it, but Government would not allow them, and they were obliged to disperse. In 1849, gold was discovered in California, and the news arriving induced many to leave this colony and go to that place. In that year, two men came to him, hearing he had seen the gold in Melbourne and for that reason believed he must know something about minerals. They took out from a leather bag different samples of mineral, among which there certainly was gold, and he doubted not, silver also. These men agreed to dig and search for more of these provided he would supply them with rations. They would, however, have to work at night, for if found doing so in the day Government would send them to gaol. To work they went at night, and succeeded in finding a supply of a kind of black sand, containing minerals of some kind, which, on being brought to Bretenna he pronounced to be gold. As soon, therefore, as a quantity was obtained, this was put in a box, and taken by him to Melbourne. But now came the most trying and difficult part of the affair — how was the gold to be extracted? A long description of the methods resorted to for this purpose followed, all of which proved at any rate, that all was not gold that glitters. In 1850, he (Mr. Tucker) started business in Kyneton, and in going soon after up the country to find a Mr. Joyce, the owner of some land in Piper street, and on going down the creek now called Forest Creek, he picked up several stones in which gold was distinctly seen. Just at this time gold was discovered at the Clunes, in quartz, some of which he obtained, and compared with those picked up in Forest Creek, and on pounding them got therefrom a solid piece. Alluvial gold was now found at Ballarat in unmistakable quantities, and similar discoveries were also made at and near Castlemaine. This was in August, 1851, when he started himself with young George Boundy, and came upon some parties working at Specimen Gully, from whose claim he brought a few nice specimens. Seeing the state of things, he came back to Kyneton, and at once fitted out a party to proceed to Forest Creek to dig for gold. He there met Captain Dana and Mr. Powlett, and procured from them fourteen licences, for which he paid £21. These were the first licences ever issued in Forest Creek, where tons of gold have since been found."[6]

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Birth of Boundy's brother Charles Russell Boundy

Births. BOUNDY.— On the 22nd inst., at Malmsbury, the wife of George Boundy of a son.[7]

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Boundy's father's property features in a new gold claim

MINING MEMS. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) THE EYE-OPENER. Malmsbury, Feb. 24. The latest mining go here is the practical development of the existence of a branch of the famous Ironstone Hill Lead gutter, at a distance from, and at an angle which it was thought it never could have reached, about which, however, great diversity of opinion has prevailed, and that even now, had it not been that the aid of certain spirits had been invoked by a wise man, this branch or tributary would, at any rate at present, never have been discovered. The scene of operations is in the home paddock of Mr George Boundy, at Georgetown, consisting of a shaft being put down by a co-operative party, and which bottomed, not at 60 feet as predicted by some, but reached the depth of 95 feet, as said by others would be the case. The bottom was also directly upon the wash, and as much as an ounce of gold was taken off the same. This prospect, under ordinary circumstances, would be looked upon as more than excellent, but hereby hangs a tale, and as told by the contending parties, savors somewhat of the marvellous and a great deal of the ridiculous. It may as well be stated here that the name given to this shaft, or co-operative company's ground is that of "The Eye-Opener," which is both quaint and significant. Also it must be stated that other mining claims are in the vicinity of this one, notably for instance that known as the Ellis' Freehold, and it is gravely suspected that the spiritualistic information obtained has been from certain living spirits having, some connection with that claim, it having been said or surmised, that the Freehold was getting its gold from or very near the quarter in which The Eye-Opener is situated. Be that as it may, it is affirmed, and not denied, that during the sinking process of the above shaft, and when nearing the bottom, sounds of the pick and other mining operations were most distinctly audible, and that even voices were heard coming from the same quarter. If this should prove to be correct, the extent of ground to be worked by the co-operative party may prove small and perhaps beautifully less, as it will be among the old workings of real live spirits, or perhaps this knocking and pick-rapping so mysteriously heard, may after all be real spirit manufacturers leading its disciples on to something tangible at last. Should this latter prove to be the case, a large accession of adherents to this new faith it is certain will take place. With reference to some underground workings in the quarter being carried on, it is fully believed that there is something in it, as mysterious hints are being dropped in various quarters about the great sell in store for certain parties; in fact that the eye-openers will be eye-opened, biters will be bit, tables turned, &c., &c., while, on the other hand, ugly predictions are indulged in of actions at law, sueing for gold obtained, improvements, &c., the whole forming a moral, and pointing to a tale that time alone will unfold, the unfolding of which will, however, be watched with very great interest by all concerned in the welfare of this mining district. The Good Friday Company will wash off its fourth machine tomorrow (Saturday), and as the country is setting softer an improved yield may be looked for.[8]

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Farewell to Boundy at Malmsbury as he departs for Qld

MALMSBURY. (From our own correspondent.) November 1. PRESENTATION TO MR. G. H. BOUNDY. A very pleasant affair came off on Friday night at the National Hotel — a presentation to Mr G. H. Boundy, who during the last four years has acted as telegraph operator at the post-office here; and who by his courteous and obliging conduct has won the golden opinions of the inhabitants generally. He has obtained a similar appointment in Queensland. The occasion of the presentation was very hurriedly arranged. About 20 ladies and gentlemen were present. The Mayor was voted to the chair, and explained the object of the gathering to be taking farewell of their young friend, and making a small presentation to him. Mr I. L. French said he was greatly pleased to have the opportunity of publicly expressing the pleasure he felt in presenting Mr Boundy with a small token of the respect and esteem in which he was held by those he was about to leave. Mr Boundy's character had been most exemplary, and a pattern to the young men of the place. His courteous bearing, and obliging manner, had won the esteem of every one. He (Mr French) felt all the more pride in speaking thus as Mr Boundy was a native of the place, and in presenting him with a testimonial : subscribed for by all classes, and with regard to which there had not been a single refusal. A much larger sum could have been obtained had time permitted, and probably the presentation would have taken another form. A short address had been prepared, which he handed to Mr Boundy with a purse of sovereigns, with the hope that they would prove useful to him, and be a memento of his career at Malmsbury. The address read as follows:—"Malmsbury, Colony of Victoria, 29th October, 1886 — To Mr George Henry Boundy — Dear Sir,— On the eve of your departure from this place, where you have during the past four years occupied the position of telegraph operator and messenger, and being about to proceed to Queensland in a similar.capacity, we herewith present you with a small purse of sovereigns in appreciation of the excellent character you have borne, and especially for your courtesy and obliging conduct at all times when in the discharge of your duties. We are sure that in your new sphere you will maintain these good qualities, and we trust that you will live to enjoy a career of usefulness that is open to you in the rising colony to which you are now going. — We are, Dear Sir, yours faithfully," (Here follow the names of the subscribers with the amounts subscribed, the total being about £17.) After a few words from Mr Adamson expressive of the pleasure it afforded him to be able to speak in such high terms of one of the Malmsbury youths. Mr Boundy responded, regretting his inability to find words suitable to enable him to convey his heartfelt thanks for the kindness shown him. He trusted those present would accept as sincere whatever he was able to give expression to by way of thanks to all who had shown such a warm interest him, by contributing to the handsome gift and the tribute accompanying it. He would value it highly, and it would ever be an inducement to him to continue on the same path he had marked out while living in Malmsbury. In conclusion, he once more expressed his thanks for the.great kindness shown to him. The address was handsomely bound in maroon velvet, the work of Mrs French, and was greatly admired. After drinking Mr Boundy's health with musical honors, and wishing him bon voyage, the proceedings terminated.[9]

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Boundy retires at age 65

FAREWELL SOCIAL. Postal Officers Retire. Messrs. G. Bolton, G. H. Boundy, and M. H. Tait, officers of the General Post Office in Brisbane, who are retiring, after nearly 50 years' service, were tendered a farewell by officials of the telegraph and engineering staffs at the Postal Institute on Saturday evening. More than 100 members of the department and their friends attended, and the Acting Deputy Director of Posts and Telegraphs (Mr. F. W. Arnold) presented to each of the retiring officers an upholstered easy chair. Mr. S. J. Wilcox (Superintendent of Telegraphs) presided. He referred to the lengthy services of the three men and regretted their departure from the service. They would be difficult to replace, he said, and certainly none commanded more respect than they. Tributes also were paid by Messrs. H. R. Moore (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), C. E. Sandercock (Telegraphic Engineer), M. P. D. Healy (Supervisor of Telegraphs), M. Twomey (president of the Telegraphists' Union), and C. H. Fuelling (secretary of the Telegraphists' Union). Mr. Bolton, who was Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs, joined the service in 1881, and Mr. Boundy (Testing Officer) two years later. Mr. Tait, who was also a Testing Officer, was transferred from the Railway Department in 1885. He was appointed Supervisor of Traffic in 1922 and Supervisor of Testing in 1926. During the evening an entertaining programme was provided by Miss Jessie Lees and Messrs. Bob Crosby. E. Woods, F. Ryland, J. Dean, and J. Macgregor. Accompaniments were played by Miss Eileen Healy.[10]

As previous

PERSONAL. . . . A farwell social was tendered in the Postal Institute on Saturday evening to Messrs. G. Boulton (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), G. H. Boundy, and M. H. Tait (testing officers), who are retiring from the service on attaining the age limit of 65 years. Mr. S. J. Wilcox (Superintendent of Telegraphs) presided over a large gathering, and on behalf of the members, presented the retiring officers each with an armchair. Speeches were also made by Messrs. H. R. Moore (Assistant Superintendent of Telegraphs), C. E. Sandercock (telegraph engineer), N. P. D. Healy (supervisor), M. Twomey; and C. H. Fuelling, and the guests made a suitable response. Musical items were contributed by Miss Jessie Lees, and Messrs. R. Crosby, J. Dean, and J. Macgregor. Miss Eileen Healy acted as pianiste, and Mr. J. Dean as master of ceremonies.[11]

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Brief obituary for Boundy

OBITUARY. MR. G. H. BOUNDY. It will be learned with regret by a wide circle of friends that Mr. G. H. Boundy, of Rockbourne-terrace, Upper Paddington, died early on Wednesday morning in a private hospital in Melbourne. The late gentleman came to Queensland in 1886 and joined the Postmaster-General's Department. After a few years in Bowen he was transferred to Brisbane where he was stationed until his retirement under the age limit last October. Mr. Boundy was for many years testing officer in the Chief Telegraph Office, in Brisbane, and acted as assistant superintendent upon more than one occasion. He was esteemed by the department as a capable and trustworthy officer. Mr. Boundy was for a long time a church warden and treasurer of Christ Church, Milton. He is survived by his widow and daughter, Joyce (who are at present in Melbourne) and two sons, Roy and Noel.[12]

As previous

Mr. G. H. Boundy. Mr. G. H. Boundy, of Rockbourne Terrace, Upper Paddington, died early on Wednesday morning in a private hospital in Melbourne. With his wife and son, Noel, he went to Victoria about six weeks ago on a visit, and became ill soon after arrival. He underwent a serious operation, but failed to recover. The late Mr. Boundy came to Queensland in 1886, and joined the Postmaster-General's Department. After a few years in Bowen he was transferred to Brisbane, where he was stationed until his retirement under the age limit last October. Mr. Boundy was for many years testing officer in the Chief Telegraph Office, in Brisbane, and acted as assistant superintendent on more than one occasion. He was much liked by his fellows, and esteemed by the Department as a capable and trustworthy officer. He was for a long time a church warden and treasurer of Christ Church, Milton. He is survived by his widow and daughter, Joyce (who are at present in Melbourne), and two sons, Roy and Noel.[13]

Death notice for Boundy

DEATHS. . . . BOUNDY.— On the 25th May, at a private hospital, George Henry second eldest son of the late George and Elizabeth Boundy, of Rosebank, Malmsbury, beloved husband of Pop, and loving father of Ray, Leslie (deceased), Joyce, and Noel, aged 65 years. BOUNDY.—On the 25th May, at Essendon, George Henry, of Upper Paddington (Queensland), beloved brother of Mary (Mrs. T. A. Horan, deceased), John W. (deceased), William F., Laura (Mrs. Rodd), Arthur E., Lottie (Mrs. R. Cargill), Bert (deceased), Charles R., Walter V., and Alf (deceased). Late of E.T.O., Brisbane.[14]

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