Circuit Idea/Bistable Mode of Current Inversion NIC

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Investigating the Bistable Mode of Negative Impedance Converters with Current Inversion

Circuit idea: Making the positive feedback dominate over the negative one.


INIC operating in bistable mode is a current-driven N-shaped true negative resistor.

IntroductionEdit

What a current inversion NIC to operate in bistable mode meansEdit

How to investigate the bistable mode of current inversion NICEdit

 
Fig. 1a: A hysteresis IV curve of current-driven INIC.
 
Fig. 1b: An N-shaped IV curve of voltage-driven INIC.

Investigating the circuit at ideal driving conditionsEdit

Increasing the input currentEdit

Negative input current, negative output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 2a: Scanning the left bottom part (0 - 1) of the curve.
 
Fig. 2b: Sinking a current from INIC.

Zero input current, negative output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 3a: Investigating the point 1 of the curve.
 
Fig. 3b: Sinking no current from INIC.

Positive input current, negative output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 4a: Scanning the left top part (1 - 2) of the curve.
 
Fig. 4b: Injecting a current to INIC.

Voltage jump upwardEdit

...start...Edit
 
Fig. 5-1a: Investigating the starting point of the voltage jump.
 
Fig. 5-1b: Making the op-amp "jump" to the positive rail.
...middle...Edit
 
Fig. 5-2a: Scanning the top jumping path (2 - 3).
 
Fig. 5-2b: The op-amp "jumps" to the positive rail.
...finalEdit
 
Fig. 5-3a: Investigating the final point of the voltage jump upward.
 
Fig. 5-3b: The op-amp "calms down" at the positive rail.

Positive input current, positive output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 6a: Scanning the right top part (3 - 4) of the curve.
 
Fig. 6b: Injecting a big current to INIC.

Decreasing the input currentEdit

Positive input current, positive output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 7a: Scanning the right top part (4 - 5) of the curve.
 
Fig. 7b: Injecting a current to INIC.

Zero input current, positive output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 8a: Investigating the point 5 of the curve.
 
Fig. 8b: Injecting no current to VNIC.

Negative input current, positive output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 9a: Scanning the right bottom part (5 - 6) of the curve.
 
Fig. 9b: Sinking a current from INIC.

Voltage jump downwardEdit

...start...Edit
 
Fig. 10-1a: Investigating the starting point of the voltage jump.
 
Fig. 10-1b: Making the op-amp "jump" to the negative rail.
...middle...Edit
 
Fig. 10-2a: Scanning the bottom jumping path (6 - 7).
 
Fig. 10-2b: The op-amp "jumps" to the negative rail.
...finalEdit
 
Fig. 10-3a: Investigating the final point of the voltage jump downward.
 
Fig. 10-3b: The op-amp "calms down" at the negative rail.

Negative input current, negative output voltageEdit

 
Fig. 11a: Scanning the left bottom part (7 - 0) of the curve.
 
Fig. 11b: Siniking a big current from INIC.

Investigating the circuit at real driving conditionsEdit

How to make INIC operate in bistable modeEdit

What is the relation with the non-inverting comparator with hysteresis?Edit

See alsoEdit

Revealing the mystery of negative impedance
Investigating the linear mode of negative impedance converters with current inversion
Negative impedance converter from Wikipedia considers NIC with current inversion (INIC).

ReferencesEdit


External linksEdit


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