Chess Opening Theory/1. g3

Benko Opening
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)
Moves: 1. g3
ECO code: A00
Parent: Starting position

1. g3 · Hungarian OpeningEdit

1. g3, the Benko opening (also known as the Benko Opening and the King's Fianchetto Opening) is the 5th most popular initial move. This move doesn't immediately influence the centre, but White prepares to fianchetto the Bishop to g2, which does. The hypermodern school of opening theory, most influential in the 1920s and 1930s, was all about controlling the centre from a distance with pieces rather than occupying it with pawns. It has many long term prospects of applying pressure on the centre and Black's Queenside. The ease with which White can castle Kingside often aids White's position. When playing this opening, White will often adopt the Barcza System, with a Bishop on g2 and a Knight on f3. Black can mirror White's fianchetto, thus entering the hypermodern Fianchetto.

StatisticsEdit

Approximate chances
White win 38%, Draw 36%, Black win 28%
Estimated next move popularity
d5 34%, e5 17%, Nf6 16%, g6 15%, c5 9%, e6 3%, f5 2%, c6 2%, d6 1%, other moves less than 1%.
move average 365Chess.com (big) Chess Tempo (all) chessgames.com Lichess (masters) Lichess (database)
...d5 33.7% 34.1 34.6 35.7 36.6 27.5
...e5 16.5 15.7 14.9 15.2 15.2 21.4
...Nf6 15.8 18.4 19.6 16.1 17.6 7.3
...g6 15.2 17.1 16.1 19.0 16.2 7.5
...c5 9.3 9.5 9.3 10.0 10.8 6.8
...e6 2.6 0.9 0.9 0.4 0.4 10.4
...f5 2.4 3.1 2.8 2.6 2.6 0.8
...c6 1.6 0.4 0.5 0.3 0.1 6.6
...d6 1.2 0.5 0.5 0.4 0.3 4.5
everything else 1.8 0.5 0.8 0.3 0.3 7.2

Theory tableEdit

1. g3
1 g3
d5
Bg2
Nf6
Nf3
c6
O-O
Bg4
=
2 ...
Nf6
Bg2
d5
See
above
3 ...
g6
Bg2
Bg7
e3
Nf6
Ne2
O-O
O-O
d5
d3
e5
4 ...
e5





5 ...
c5
Nf3
Nc6
Bg2
g6



=
6...

b6

Bg2

ReferencesEdit


For explanation of theory tables, see theory table and for notation, see algebraic notation.

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