Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...c6/2. d4/2...d5/3. Nc3/3...dxe4/4. Nxe4/4...Nf6/5. Nxf6/5...gxf6

< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...c6‎ | 2. d4‎ | 2...d5‎ | 3. Nc3‎ | 3...dxe4‎ | 4. Nxe4‎ | 4...Nf6‎ | 5. Nxf6
Bronstein-Larsen Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)
Moves: 1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6 gxf6

Caro-Kann Defence:Bronstein-Larsen VariationEdit

Black has voluntarily opted for an inferior kingside pawn structure, an isolated h-pawn, and a practical necessity of castling queenside, but also has some compensation in the form of the open g-file for the rook and unusually active play for the Caro-Kann. It is generally considered somewhat more unsound than 5...exf6, but former top-10 player Bent Larsen employed it with some success during the 1970s. Black has more control of the center and a possible ...Bh6 later on.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables, see theory table and for notation, see algebraic notation..

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Nf6 5. Nxf6+ gxf6

6
c3
Nf3
Bc4
Ne2
Be2
Be3
g3
Qd3
Bf4
Qf3

When contributing to this Wikibook, please follow the Conventions for organization.

ReferencesEdit