Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...e6

The key move of the Horwitz Defense. The main purpose of this move is to transpose to mainline openings without immediately showing your opponent your cards.

Queen's Pawn Opening
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)
Moves: 1. d4 e6

1...e6Edit

At this point, it is more likely to transpose into a myriad of 1. d4 openings. What is unique about this move is that it is somewhat of an invitation for white to enter the French.

White can play almost anything at this point, but 2. c4 and 2. e4 are the more common replies.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables, see theory table and for notation, see algebraic notation..

'1. d4 e6'

2 3
c4
...
=
Nf3
...
=
e4
...
=

When contributing to this Wikibook, please follow the Conventions for organization.

ReferencesEdit

  • Nunn's Chess Openings. 1999. John Nunn (Editor), Graham Burgess, John Emms, Joe Gallagher. ISBN 1-8574-4221-0.
  • Modern Chess Openings: MCO-14. 1999. Nick de Firmian, Walter Korn. ISBN 0-8129-3084-3.
  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.