Canadian Refugee Procedure/107 - Decision on Claim for Refugee Protection

IRPA Section 107: Decision on Claim for Refugee ProtectionEdit

Section 107 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act reads:

Decision on Claim for Refugee Protection

Decision
107 (1) The Refugee Protection Division shall accept a claim for refugee protection if it determines that the claimant is a Convention refugee or person in need of protection, and shall otherwise reject the claim.

Section 107(1): The Division shall accept a claim for refugee protection if it determines that the claimant is a Convention refugee or a person in need of protectionEdit

Section 107(1) of the IRPA states that the Division shall accept a claim for refugee protection if it determines that the claimant is a Convention refugee or person in need of protection. This language creates a right for those who meet the criteria to be so recognized. This tracks the language of the 1985 Rabbi Plaut report that led to the founding of the Immigration and Refugee Board, which noted that "declaring a claimant to be a refugee is not a privilege we grant, but rather a right we acknowledge."[1] This was not always the conception of refugee protection embodied in Canadian legislation - prior to 1976, the refugee had no rights under Canadian law since the relief granted by the Immigration Appeal Board was discretionary in nature.[2] See also: Canadian Refugee Procedure/The Board's inquisitorial mandate#Refugee Status Determination is declaratory, not constitutive.

IRPA Section 107(2): No Credible BasisEdit

No credible basis
(2) If the Refugee Protection Division is of the opinion, in rejecting a claim, that there was no credible or trustworthy evidence on which it could have made a favourable decision, it shall state in its reasons for the decision that there is no credible basis for the claim.

A finding that a claim has no credible basis affects appeal rights to the RADEdit

A finding that a claimant has no credible basis prevents a claimant from appealing a decision to the RAD.[3]

IRPA Section 107.1: Manifestly unfounded claimsEdit

Manifestly unfounded
107.1 If the Refugee Protection Division rejects a claim for refugee protection, it must state in its reasons for the decision that the claim is manifestly unfounded if it is of the opinion that the claim is clearly fraudulent.

History of this provisionEdit

Provision in the legislation for differently processing manifestly founded claims have been in the Act since the 1976 Immigration Act. At that point, the guidelines used by the Refugee Status Advisory Committee created four categories of manifestly unfounded claims: 1) claims that presented no evidence of any of the five essential criteria of the definition; 2) claims where the evidence presented was so manifestly unreliable "that no reasonable person could believe it"; 3) claims made under Section 45 of the Act when the claimant had already submitted an in-status claim and the second claim presented no new information; and 4) claims made by the spouse of a rejected claimant when the claim was based solely on the rejected spouse's claim.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. W. Gunther Plaut, Refugee determination in Canada: A report to the Honourable Flora MacDonald, Minister of Employment and Immigration, April 1985, Government of Canada publication, page 17.
  2. W. Gunther Plaut, Refugee determination in Canada: A report to the Honourable Flora MacDonald, Minister of Employment and Immigration, April 1985, Government of Canada publication, page 55.
  3. Perez Aquila, Jose Rodolfo v. M.C.I. (F.C., No. IMM-1722-21), Walker, February 21, 2022, 2022 FC 231.
  4. From the Immigration Manual, as cited in Alan Nash, International Refugee Pressures and the Canadian Public Policy Response, Discussion Paper, January 1989, Studies in Social Policy, page 42.