Vision Science: Scientific Papers Database

IntroductionEdit

Vision science studies various physiological and perceptual aspects of visual sense from the perspectives of cognitive psychology, neuroscience, computer science, psychophysics, and ophthalmology.

The idea of this wikibook is to share expert knowledge among scientists working in various fields of Vision Science. Mastering the knowledge accumulated in the course of the previous research is of paramount importance. A scientist is usually an expert in one or two fields, and entering a new field can be a daunting task. While it is possible to search scientific databases such as Web of Science by keywords or author names, the search results can be confusing, unsatisfactory, and incomplete. Why not instead use the expertise of those who worked in the field for many years?

Below is the list of fields and subfields of Vision Science. Feel free to edit the list and add new fields and associated wikibook pages. Each subfield contains a list of original and review articles published in peer reviewed journals. The articles are listed in the order of publication date. If you add a new article please make sure that it fits in between the right dates and conforms with the Journal of Vision citation format accepted here, e.g.

  • Hubel D., Wiesel T. (1962). Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat's visual cortex. The Journal of Physiology, 160, 106–154. FREE Full Text

Make sure to add a link to a free text, if available. To add a new citation click on 'edit' link above the section to which you want to add the citation. Locate the right position for the citation (based on the publication date) and insert the citation by copying and pasting a previous citation and modifying it. The wiki formatting syntax is fairly self-explanatory, use the formatting tools and the 'Help' link at the top of the editing page for less obvious bits. Make sure to preview your edits before saving them. 'Save page' and 'Show preview' buttons are located at the bottom of the editing page.

In addition to the usual citation fields, the annotation field can be used. You are strongly encouraged to annotate your citations, because title alone is often not enough to understand what the paper is about. Annotation should be no longer than one or two sentences and should covey the value of the cited paper in the most concise and clear form. Use new line and small font for annotations, e.g.

  • Hubel D., Wiesel T. (1962). Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat's visual cortex. The Journal of Physiology, 160, 106–154. FREE Full Text

A pioneering study in which microelectrodes were used to record extracellurarly responses of neurons in the primary visual cortex of anaesthetized cats. The study identified several types of neuronal receptive fields and showed that cortical neurons are selective for stimulus orientation and binocularity.

While it is only natural to cite your own research papers please also add citations of classical papers, if they are missing. Thanks for your help!

NeuroscienceEdit

PsychophysicsEdit

  • Color Perception
  • Form Perception
  • Motion Perception
  • Depth Perception
  • Attention
  • Eye Movements
  • Visual Memory
  • Perception and Action
  • Integration with other senses

Theory and Computational VisionEdit

  • Color Perception Models
  • Lightness Perception Models
  • Form Perception Models
  • Natural Image Statistics
  • Depth Perception Models
  • Models of Saliency and Attention

ClinicalEdit

Last modified on 20 September 2010, at 12:34