Pharmacology/Antidepressants

We usually write DA for the dopamine neurotransmitter and 5-HT for the serotonin neurotransmitter. These two neurotransmitters are usually slow and a lot less common than the major ones. They originate in brainstem, but they are released throughout the entire brain and spine.[1]

Amazingly enough, even though they are called antidepressants, they can be used for a lot of non-depression related illnesses. For instance, SSNRI's are used in conjunction with pain medication for pain in cancer patients.

In this section we will attempt to answer what depression is; what anxiety is; how we treat them; and what antidepressants are.

AntidepressantsEdit

  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)
This inhibits the 5-HT reuptake.
  • Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA)
This inhibits 5-HT and NE reuptake, and antagonizes ACh receptors.
  • Monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI)
This inhibits MAO breakdown of 5-HT, NE, and DA.
  • Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI)
This inhibits 5-HT and NE reuptake.


ExamplesEdit

  • Mirtazapine: Antagonizes presynaptic NE receptors and thus boosts the release of NE and 5-HT receptors, and antognises specific postsynaptic 5-HT receptors to relieve anxiety. [2]
  • Bupropion: Inhibits NE and DA reuptake. Making it very good for stimulant addicts.
  • Atomoxetine: Inhibits NE reuptake. Making it very good for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).


ReferencesEdit

Introduction

  1. MIT OCW 2013 Drugs and The Brain
  2. MIT OCW 2013 Drugs and The Brain