Past LSAT Explained/PrepTest 39

December 2002 Form 2LSS54

Section I Analytical Reasoning edit

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Which could be a complete & accurate list of the fish selected:

(a) 3 J, 1 K, 2 M: If she selects M, she must also have 2O and 1P.

(b) 1J, 1K, 1M, 3O: Cannot have K and O.

(c) 1J, 1M, 2O, 1P: This is the correct answer.

(d) 1J, 1N, 1O, 2P: Cannot have only 1O; must have 2.

(e) 1M, 1N, 2O, 1P: Cannot have M and N.

Question 20 edit

If she does not select P, what could she select:

Since P is required to select O, M, and N, that leaves J, K, and L. Option (a) J and K is the only option which includes ONLY J, K, or L.

Question 21 edit

There is no limit to the number of fish Barbara can select, so the only thing to consider in this question is Not Laws. If she wants as many types fish as possible, she needs to select O, since M, N, and P all require the selection of O. If she selects K, she cannot select O, so the species she cannot select is K.

Question 22 edit

The question asks which must be false.

(a) Barbara selects 4 fish, at least one is J: She can select 4 J fish.

(b) 4 fish, at least one L: Again, she can select 4 L.

(c) 3 fish, at least one is M: If she selects M, she must select O and P, and if she selects O, she must have 2. Therefore, (c) is the correct answer, because she cannot select M without having at least 4 fish.

(d) 3 fish, at least one is O: She can select 2 O and 1 P.

(e) 3 fish, one is P: Same scenario as in answer (d).

Question 23 edit

If you diagrammed potential selections in Question 21, that diagram should have the answer for question 23: minimum of 1 fish, maximum of 5. (M or N, O, P, J, L). It is a maximum of five because you cannot select K and O, or M and N, which leaves 5 options without any Not Laws.

Section II Logical Reasoning edit

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IDENTIFY

This is a Conclusion question.

READ

Politician proposes a principle for restricting individual liberty.

ANALYZE

CHOOSE (A) (B) (C) (D) (E)

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Section III Reading Comprehension edit

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Canadian copyright law Internet fair use

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Section IV Logical Reasoning edit

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Lesile Judd Ahlander, "Mexico's Muralists and the New York School." 1979 by The General Secretariat of the Organization of American States.

Barbara Kantrowitz, Andrew Cohen, and Melinda Liu, "My Info is NOT Your Info." 1994 by Newsweek, Inc.

Thomas S. Kuhn, Black-Body Theory and the Quantum Discontinuity 1894-1912. 1978 by Oxford University Press, Inc.

Marina Tatar, Off with Their Heads!: Fairy Tales and the Culture of Childhood. 1992 by Princeton University Press.