Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nf6/3. Nxe5/3...Nc6/4. Nxc6/4...dxc6/5. e5/5...Ne4/6. d3

< Chess Opening Theory‎ | 1. e4‎ | 1...e5‎ | 2. Nf3‎ | 2...Nf6‎ | 3. Nxe5‎ | 3...Nc6‎ | 4. Nxc6‎ | 4...dxc6‎ | 5. e5‎ | 5...Ne4
Stafford Gambit
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation (FEN)
Moves: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nc6 4. Nxc6 dxc6 5. e5 Ne4 6. d3

Stafford GambitEdit

6.e3??Edit

Although better than 6.f3??, the move gives Black a winning tactic. Instead of moving the knight away, Black has the move 6...Bc5!, sacrificing the knight.

Targeting the weak f-pawn, White's best move is blocking with 7. Be3. After the bishops trade 8...Qh4+ wins the rook for a knight, a common theme in the Stafford Gambit.

More commonly, White captures the knight with 7. dxe4. This allows 7...Bxf2+, sacrificing the bishop. If the White king captures the bishop, Black will capture the undefended queen. Otherwise, the White king will move up and 8...Bg4+ wins the queen.

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ReferencesEdit