Last modified on 13 February 2013, at 05:24

The Computer Revolution/Peripherals/Graphic Tablets

Graphic Tablet OverviewEdit

Graphic tablets are a pen-based input device that are also known as pen tablet or digitizing tablets. The way the tablet communicates with the computer is via a USB port. Once both are connected you can sketch, or write anything on the tablet and the computer will automatically display the image or writing on the screen. The tablet can also deliver commands to the computer, just like a mouse would. This device is commonly used by professional that works a lot with a pen and paper pad, such as cartoon animation, photography editing, and graphic artist. Graphic tablets main purpose is to add pen like abilities to a computer. (Morley and Parker 134-135)


Graphic Tablet


Wacom Pen-tablet without mouse

Pen comes with paper and so a graphics tablet comes with a stylus pen ensuring that the user becomes easily familiar and comfortable with the object. First and foremost, the graphics tablet can substitute the mouse.

Uses for the graphic tabletEdit

They can be used in many different cases by many different people. For example: the digital artist can work with drawings by sketching in Photoshop. Or if the writer wants to trace words from a sheet of paper and send it into the computer.

Graphics tablets are incredibly convenient for some artists, who much prefer the familiarity of a pen stylus, compared to the mouse. In addition, they are also acknowledged for lessening wrist pain.

If I were a graphic artist, I would be most excited about using a graphic tablet. Using a mouse in this field would be impossible. It would be so much easier to use a pen to create my sketches for advertising, training material or printing of personalized invitations. The use of a graphic tablet can also be used to modify digital photographs. This is done by using an image editing software. Being a photographer this is probably essential! You would be able to airbrush any imperfections in your photos, making your clients very happy. (Morley and Parker, page 135)