The Computer Revolution/Databases/Content Management Systems

Content Management Systems

Content Management Systems (CMSs) are document management systems that can include images, multimedia files and other content in addition to conventional documents. Content Management Systems can include, but are not limited to, Document Management Systems (DMSs) and Enterprise Content Management Systems (ECMs).

Document management, often referred to as Document Management Systems (DMS), is the use of a computer system and software to store, manage and track electronic documents and electronic images of paper based information captured through the use of a document scanner. The term document is defined as "recorded information or an object which can be treated as a unit". DM systems allow documents to be modified and managed but typically lack the records retention and disposition functionality for managing records.

Document management, while still recognized and utilized independently, it is also a common component found within an Enterprise Content Management environment. According to Wikipedia, "Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is a formalized means of organizing and storing an organization's documents, and other content, that relate to the organization's processes. The term encompasses strategies, methods, and tools used throughout the lifecycle of the content".

The website, AIIM.org, refers to Enterprise Content Management (ECM) as, " the strategies, methods and tools used to capture, manage, store, preserve, and deliver content and documents related to organizational processes. ECM tools and strategies allow the management of an organization's unstructured information, wherever that information exists.

As of 2012, the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM) gives some examples of unstructured information and examples of their classifications and how they might be organized using a content management system. Below are examples found on their website AIIM.org:

Content and Documents

Unstructured content enters an organization's IT infrastructure from a variety of sources. Regardless of how a piece of content enters, it has a lifecycle. Follow a document through its lifecycle as viewed through the use of ECM technology. 1.Electronic Unstructured Data: email, instant message, text document, spreadsheet, etc. 2.Electronic Forms 3.Paper Documents/Forms

Scanning

Paper generally enters the organization through a scanner, or sometimes, a multifunction device. In centralized scan operations, large volumes of paper are put into the system by dedicated workers. In distributed operations, smaller volumes of documents are captured with lower volume scanners or multifunction devices closer to their point of creation.

Document Imaging

Software captures the image of the paper document. Increasingly, electronic document images have the same legal status as a paper document.

Forms Processing

Business forms are ingested into the system. Most forms today are "structured"-the location of the form elements are known. The ability to process unstructured forms, those without a pre-defined form template, is improving.

Recognition

Technologies that allow paper information to be translated to electronic data without manual data input. Recognition technologies have progressive capabilities from optical character recognition (OCR) to intelligent character recognitions (ICR) and are important for converting large amounts of forms or unstructured data to usable information in a content management system.

Categorization/Taxonomy

A taxonomy provides a formal structure for information, based on the individual needs of a business. Categorization tools automate the placement of content (document images, email, text documents, i.e., all electronic content) for future retrieval based on the taxonomy. Users can also manually categorize documents. Critical step to ensure that content is properly stored.

Indexing

An essential part of the capture process, creates metadata from scanned documents (customer ID number, for example) so the document can be found. Indexing can be based on keywords or full-text.

Document Management

Document management technology helps organizations better manage the creation, revision, approval, and consumption of electronic documents. It provides key features such as library services, document profiling, searching, check-in, check-out, version control, revision history, and document security.

Records Management

Content of long-term business value are deemed records and managed according to a retention schedule that determines how long a record is kept based on either outside regulations or internal business practices. Any piece of content can be designated a record.

Email Management

As the de facto standard for business communication, removing emails from the server and saving them to a repository isn't enough. Email must be classified, stored, and destroyed consistent with business standards-just as any other document or record.

Web Content Management

Web content management technology addresses the content creation, review, approval, and publishing processes of Web-based content. Key features include creation and authoring tools or integrations, input and presentation template design and management, content re-use management, and dynamic publishing capabilities.

Digital Asset Management

Similar in functionality to document management, DAM is focused on the storage, tracking, and use of rich media documents (video, logos, photographs, xrays, sonograms,etc.). Roots of the technology are in the media and entertainment industry, currently experiencing growth, especially in marketing departments. Digital assets typically have high intellectual property values.

Digital Radiography

Digital radiology may represent the greatest technological advancement in medical imaging over the last decade. The use of radiographic films in x ray imaging might become obsolete in a few years. Images can be immediately acquired, deleted, modified, and subsequently sent to a network of computers. The referring physician can view the requested image on a desktop or a personal computer and often report in just a few minutes after the examination was performed. The images are no longer held in a single location; but can be seen simultaneously by physicians who are miles apart. In addition, the patient can have the x ray images on a compact disk to take to another physician or hospital.

http://www.aiim.org/What-is-Document-Management https://rpop.iaea.org/RPOP/RPoP/Content/InformationFor/HealthProfessionals/1_Radiology/DigitalRadiography.htm http://www.aiim.org/What-is-ECM-Enterprise-Content-Management http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_content_management

Last modified on 4 November 2012, at 22:33