Last modified on 30 April 2009, at 18:44

Past LSAT Explained/Methodology

THINK LIKE THE TESTMAKERS The LSAT is a test of your way of thinking. It tests how well you think like the testmakers. Once you start to think like them, you can be thought as having the LSAT mind. Your preparation of the LSAT should therefore focus on learning to this way of thinking.

Logical ReasoningEdit

This PrepTest explanation for Logical Reasoning sections follows a methodology called IRAC(pronounced EYE-rack) which stands for: Identify, Read, Analyze, and Choose. It is a step by step methodology for tackling LSAT questions.

Identify

The IRAC starts with quickly scanning the question. Most LSAT questions start with a brief passage or statement followed by a question. It is important to figure out exactly what the question is looking for. You may decide to skip the question if you are low on time or the question seems too difficult. You can choose to guess random.

Read

You need to move to the beginning of the passage and quickly and accurately work the passage. Underline, paraphrase and engage with the passage. Using symbols to mark the passage. Do not overanalyze or bring outside information or knowledge but stick to what's provided.

Analyze

Use your LSAT analytical skill. Apply the right analysis required by the question. You are not given credit for doing something else. Once you are done with analyzing the passage, move to each response.

Choose

Reading ComprehensionEdit

This PrepTest explanation for Reading Comprehension sections follows a methodology called BRIEF (you are essentially briefing the passage) which stands for: Break, Read, Internalize, Eliminate, Find. It is a step by step methodology for tackling LSAT questions.

Break

Go to the questions and figure out the key terms and words. You are essentially breaking the question. When you read, pay a special attention to those words and relationship.

Read

Scan quickly and visualize a chart in your brain.

Internalize

Digest what you read.

Eliminate

Do not look for the right answer. Look for the wrong one first.

Find

Mark your answer sheet and move on.

Analytical ReasoningEdit

This PrepTest explanation for Analytical Reasoning sections follows a methodology called CASES which stands for: Chart, Analyze, S, Eliminate, Select. It is a step by step methodology for tackling LSAT questions.


Chart

Analyze

S Eliminate

Select