Past LSAT Explained/Method of Argument(LR)

TypeEdit

It is mentioned as one possible reason for adopting a policy for which the author suggests an additional reason.

Taking the highest score among multiple LSAT scores may relieve test anxiety for many law school applicants. As critics point out, however, it also encourages students to take the test multiple times, incurring unnecessary costs and time for test preparation. Yet, since the ABA statistics show that the highest score is the better predictor for law school performance than the average score, law schools should change their policy to consider the highest test score rather than the average.

TypeEdit

It is a claim that the author attempts to refute with counterarguments. The admissions officer argues that the average score of all LSAT taken is the best measure of the applicant's ability. This is clearly nonsense. Suppose we have one college senior who received a 160 and then a 172. Compare this person with another who received 166 twice. Can we say their abilities are equal? How about someone who got a 172 the first time and 160 the second time due to illness? People who have one score are usually do not take it again because they are satified with the score and often they believe it is the highest possible score.

TypeEdit

It is a hypothesis for which the teacher offers additional evidence.

TypeEdit

It is cited as an insufficient reason for elimination.

TypeEdit

It is cited as an objection that has been raised to the position the author is supporting.

TypeEdit

The argument proceeds by

TypeEdit

a method of reasoning employed by the argument

TypeEdit

a technique of reasoning employed by the argument

TypeEdit

X responds by

TypeEdit

responds in which one of the following ways

TypeEdit

uses which one of the following techniques in countering

TypeEdit

the role of the argument X in the argument is

TypeEdit

the statement X figures in the argument in which one of the following ways

TypeEdit

the statement X plays which of the following roles in the argument?

TypeEdit

It presents the conclusion of the argument.

TypeEdit

It makes a key word in the argument more precise.

TypeEdit

It illustrates a consequence of one of the claims that are used to support the conclusion.

TypeEdit

It distracts attention from the point at issue.

TypeEdit

It concedes a point that is then used to support the conclusion.

Last modified on 30 April 2009, at 18:45