Last modified on 20 February 2014, at 04:15

Palm OS Guide

PalmOS is the operating system for Palm handheld computers.

Getting StartedEdit

Handheld BasicsEdit

Upon powering up a Palm Handheld users will see the "Home" applications page. This page displays the applications on the handheld. Users can also organize applications by Main, Utilities, Games among other categories for easy access.

Using a pen-like instrument, called a Stylus, users can input data using Palm's handwriting recognition software called Graffiti.

Datebook (Calendar)Edit

The Palm Datebook is one of the main applications included in the Palm OS. It is a digital version of the calendar or datebook usually found in a regular organizer. This application is used to write down appointments and events and offers four views:

Daily: the user can see all the appointments and events for a single day, divided in an hourly schedule.

Weekly: the user can see all the appointments and events for a single week, divided in days and into which appointments for each day can be seen up to a 1-hour detail.

Monthly: the user can see all the days of a month, in which appointments are only seen for each day in a collective perspective, shown as one or several appointments for the morning, or for noon, or for evening/night.

Agenda: the user can see a digest of the day in a format that shows the most immediate appointments and the most immediate tasks (See the ToDos or Task List).

A calendar is, essentially, a document that shows a timeline, with a given detail. In a regular paper organizer, the calendar "application" comprises several sets of sheets separated according to the detail they express in relation to the timeline, like the yearly, monthly, weekly or daily sections. Ideally, in a paper organizer, all these different formats shall express the same information the user writes into, with a given detail strictly due to the detail a certain timeline format shows. The purpose of these documents is to reach a time management status. And that set of sheets with the minimal detail chosen by the user to write down the specific activities to accomplish is usually referred to as the datebook, because it's there where the user will write down appointments and events related to the day-to-day needs. A regular paper calendar offers several problems to the user: how to use all these different sections of the timeline in a practical manner, use them with an effective sense of accomplishment, and with the least loss of information possible.

The Palm Datebook is used just as all these sections of the paper organizer, but instead offers them all within a single application. The different detail of the timeline is observed, but there is no difference in the information abroad all these timeline "formats", for they belong to the very same application. This type of application made an old dream possible: to express the very same information in different detail, abroad different timeline formats.

According to the different Palm OS-based models, and according to the versions of this OS itself, the Date Book application can appear to be named as such, or as Calendar. In the latest versions of the Palm OS Garnet, both appear to be listed within the applications of the OS, but only one appears available to the user; this circumstance is due to the posibility to synchronize the very same application with different folders containing similar information, a folder called Date Book and a folder called Calendar. Anyway, the user has only one application to use for his everyday needs.

Address Book (Contacts)Edit

palm os specially build for developing mobile like applications. In fact, a mobile device have a small capacity memory rather than computer system.

To-do List (Todos)Edit

Memo Pad (Memos)Edit

Note Pad (Notes)Edit

CalculatorEdit

HandheldsEdit

3com / Palm / PalmOne / Palm, Inc.Edit

PalmVEdit

With its sleek, legendary design, PalmV and PalmVx are marketed toward corporate executives and alike. It has successfully turned Palm handhelds from "geek's toys" to a fashion accessory and a symbol of status. PalmV comes with 2MB RAM in addition to 2MB of flash ROM while a later released Vx offers 8MB for more storage.

SonyEdit

S seriesEdit

PEG-S300Edit

S300 is Sony's first attempt in PalmOS market. A grayscale, 16MB model offers Sony's original designs such as Jog Dial and Memory Stick that later revolutionized the Palm handheld market.

PEG-S500CEdit

TH seriesEdit

PEG-TH55Edit

One of the best handheld ever made, Sony's TH55 offers innovative CLIE organizer which allows users to draw freehand notes, add stickers and even insert photos and sound clips on datebook entries, calendar and notes. TH55 is the only model in the TH series; Sony did, however, offer an alternative TH55DK model in Japan with dictionaries included. Sony also sold other models in the Europe (TH55/E1 and TH55/E2, which offer bluetooth) and in Asia-Pacific (TH55/H).

HandspringEdit

SymbolEdit

KyoceraEdit

HacksEdit

Hacks are programs that extend the function of your palm. Sometimes called "Extensions," hacks enable your Palm handheld to do more than its original OS is capable of. Hacks such as inverting backlight foreground/background and changing system fonts are available for download. You need to install a hack management program before using hacks. There are three hack management programs.

TealMaster and X-Master claim to be 100% compatable with Hackmaster.

Note: Hacks are generally incompatible with PalmOS 5.x and 6.x as they are based on a different processor.

WARNING: As of above, be extra careful using applications that speed up processing power, (CLOCK APPS), most of them are designed to work on EZ Motorola Processors.

Misaligned DigitizerEdit

Sometimes your digitizer(touchscreen) goes out of alignment. You can usually align it by going to the Prefs app. But what if you screen is so out of alignment you can't go to Prefs? Install Z-Digitizer. It will let you align your screen after every soft reset. So just hotsync Z-Digitizer to your palm, poke the hole at the back, and you're back in business!