High School Physics/Force

There is a reason why buffet owners cringe in the sight of a sumo wrestler, speaking in their walkie talkies "code 11...code11," preparing the special seats and the special food to handle such masses. As you may not know, people tend to gain weight while eating. As they eat, the net force of their body on the chair is thus changed. For example, if named Buffet owner does not prepare himself for such an arrival of such a hardcore bunch, then "normal" accommodations will simply fail. For example, as the sumo wrestler is too big for the chair and tends to eat food traditionally sitting down, he thus has to sit on the table citing that the floor is not pure enough for his presence. As the table is made of wood, and the sumo wrestler being the weight of 3 normal sized people, as the food wrestler consumes his food, his mass increases. Once the support of the table can not support his force anymore, the table breaks!

The simple reason why sumo wrestlers "break tables and eat lots of food" is because they are trained to exert a great "force" on other objects around it. The reason why Sumo wrestlers break tables is because due to their massive weight and the support of the table being smaller than their weight, the net force of the interaction results in the breaking of tables.

Many people say that Sir Isaac Newton discovered gravity due to seeing a apple fall on his head (likely due to the interaction of the apple and the collision with his head)

The classic equation: Newtons Second law (from Newton's'Principa', published 1687, Cambridge)

Force = Mass x acceleration

From common experience, everybody knows is that if you exert a force on an object with a certain mass, it will definitely accelerate or move. Unfortunately, many people who have played sports have felt the force of the ball interact with some part of their body. Their testimony wil cite that the faster and the more massive an object is, the more force it will exert on the contact.

Concepts
(More)Force = (More)Mass X (More) Acceleration
(less)Force = (less)Mass X (less) Acceleration
Last modified on 17 December 2009, at 16:04