English in Use/Sentences Overview

IntroductionEdit

This section will serve as a basic overview of sentences. Each topic will be discussed in more detail in subsequent chapters.

PhrasesEdit

A phrase is a group of words which contains neither a subject nor a verb. (It may, however, contain a verbal form such as an infinitive, a participle, or a gerund.)[1]

ClausesEdit

A clause is a group of words containing at least a subject and a verb (the baby ate), and frequently it lets its hair down by containing some kind of a complement as well (the baby ate the goldfish). There are two kinds of clauses: independent and dependent.[2]

FormsEdit

There are three forms of a sentence: simple, compound, and complex, and one combined form: compound-complex.

SimpleEdit

CompoundEdit

ComplexEdit

Compound-complexEdit

PurposesEdit

Sentences are created for four main reasons: to declare, to command, to question, and to exclaim.

DeclarativeEdit

ImperativeEdit

InterrogativeEdit

ExclamatoryEdit

Sentence diagramsEdit

Verbals ·      English in Use · Basic componenents
Introduction · About
Words: Articles · Nouns · Pronouns · Verbs · Adjectives · Adverbs · Prepositions, Conjunctions, and Interjections · Verbals
Sentences: Sentences Overview · Basic Components · Phrases · Clauses · Fragments and Run-on Sentences
Usage: Adjective and Adverb Usage · Pronoun Usage · Subject-verb Agreement · Verb Usage
Punctuation: End Marks · Commas · Apostrophes · Quotations · Other Common Punctuation Marks · Less Common Typographical Marks
Other key topics: Time and Date · Capitalization · Spelling · Figures of Syntax · Syntax · Recent Grammar Restructure Attempts
Appendices: Glossary · Q&A · External Resources · Common errors · History · Dictionary · Thesaurus
Last modified on 4 September 2010, at 20:17