Last modified on 6 March 2011, at 02:28

English in Use/Q&A

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Open or OpenedEdit

When do you use 'open' and when do you use 'opened'?

For example in sentences like : The door was open. The door was opened.

                               The box is open or The box is opened.
Following is/am/are, etc., 'open' is used as an adjective, describing the state of the object. 'To be opened' is always a passive verb, which means someone performed an action on the object. For example, "The store is opened at 7AM (by the owner); the store is open from 7:00-10:00. Depending on the characteristics of the object, "is opened" can be replaced by the active form "opens" ("The store opens (itself) at 7:00."). This can also be done with another object: "The owner opens the store. I open the box." "The door was opened." means that someone performed the action of opening the door in the past. "The door was open." means that the door was in that open state in the past, but was not necessarily opened or closed by anybody. --hagindaz 15:26, 3 August 2006 (UTC)

how to make sentence with 2 noun and a pronoun and 2 adjective and a verb and a adverb and a conjunction and a preposition?

grammar based sentences

I HAVE TO KNOW THAT WHAT IS FUTUTRE TIME REFERENCE

Hi, can you tell me how you would describe the phrase "in common with"? Is it an adjective phrase, a comparative or what? thanks -

Analysis of this sentence depends on how one sees it. Lets begin with the word common, there are many uses to the word common, and as well, there many definitions. The problem with the word is it can be used to describe "common decency - something all should follow, or share", or it can be used to define the way "people share one thing, be it an object, an interest". To answer your question, I truthfully would agree it is a comparative, because you are comparing two 'things' but, also stating that these two things share one common purpose.

The use of the gerund : "being"Edit

Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why. (It does not sound right to me)

A. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid being at boiling point."

compared to

B. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid is at boiling point." Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why.

be: verb and auxiliary verb, is: present singular 3rd person being: present participle

Thank-you

Douglas Murray

The use of the gerund : "being"Edit

Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why. (It does not sound right to me).

A. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid being at boiling point."

compared to

B. "The design margin is one metre, assuming the liquid is at boiling point." Is the following correct or incorrect technically and why.

be: verb and auxiliary verb, is: present singular 3rd person being: present participle

Thanks

Douglas Murray

11th January 2007

a list of good interesting phrases for english composition.Edit

could i have a list of good interesting phrases for English compositions?

LanguageEdit

       "No language, no society".Justify the truism or otherwise of this assertion.

What is the difference between revise and review?Edit

They are two different usages.

The author "revises" the document. - making changes to the document

The reviewer "reviews" the author's document. - read and comment the document

Example.jpg

verbs.Edit

what are the types of verbs in the following sentence? It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas.