Last modified on 14 November 2009, at 16:11

Creating Screencasts/Technical issues

File SizeEdit

Before starting a screencast, you want to make sure you will have adequate space to store the final video. It's generally a good idea to have at least double the space you think the resulting video will be.

Controlling Video File SizeEdit

Not all these options may be available to you when recording and may instead be hard-coded into the software as presets.

  • Resolution
    • This is the size of your video's width and height in pixels. Generally, more pixels = more memory, so having a larger resolution will result in a larger file size.
  • Capture rate
    • How often a frame (still picture) is recorded. This is usually denoted in milliseconds (ms). A lower capture rate will result in more frames being captured during a given interval of time.
  • Framerate
    • This represents the amount of frames played in a given time period. Usually it is denoted with frames-per-second (fps).
  • Bitrate
    • The maximum amount of data allowed to be recorded at a given time. Usually measured in Kb/S.
  • Compression \ Codecs
    • The encoding scheme used to store the video.
  • Keyframes
    • This stands for whole or complete frames.

Easy on the eyesEdit

Fullscreen VS region recording. Maintaining a descent file size without sacrificing readability in compression.

Controlling Audio SizeEdit

  • Channels (mono vs stereo)
    • If you're just recording your voice from a microphone, mono (single channel) is recommended.
  • Frequency
    • Measured in Hertz
  • Bitrate
    • The maximum amount of data allowed to be recorded at a given time. Usually measured in Kb/S.
  • Compression
    • The encoding scheme used to store the audio data.