Last modified on 15 August 2014, at 22:45

Cookbook:Tattie scone

Cookbook | Ingredients | Recipes

Hot buttered tattie scones at the front of a large plate of scones.

Tattie scones or potato scones are a regional variant of the savoury " girdle scone" which is especially popular in Scotland. Many variations of recipe exist, however they generally include liberal quantities of boiled Tatties (potatoes) and salt.

They are also known as potato bread in Ireland.

Potato scones are traditionally quarter circular fan shaped, and generally about 90 mm in radius. Because of this, potato scones are often bought in multiples of four. They are distinct from other scones in being made deliberately thin (usually 7 mm or so) – they are, in many ways, more like a soft oatcake than a true scone. Nowadays, they're usually served as part of a cooked breakfast with fried eggs, bacon, etc.

A fairly easy recipe for potato scones is as follows:

IngredientsEdit

ProcedureEdit

  1. Cook 1 kg floury potatoes (Yukon Gold etc.) in salted boiling water until tender, drain them well and put them back into the hot pot to dry them out a bit.
  2. Mash them well with lots of butter and salt and pepper, but no milk or other liquid. Let them cool.
  3. When the potatoes are cold, stir in flour and a little more melted butter to make a smooth dough. Roll out to a thickness of about 5 mm, and cut into 3" (7.5cm) triangles.
  4. Cook in a lightly buttered frying pan until golden, about 1-2 minutes a side.
  5. Serve the potato scones right away with cold butter to spread on top, or store them in the fridge until you want to use them, reheating them in a well-buttered frying pan.
  6. Some people are content to eat them cold with butter, or heat them in a toaster for buttering. They also freeze very, very well.

Considered by many Scots to be a perfect accompaniment to Irn-Bru as a hangover cure.