Last modified on 21 July 2010, at 22:57

Cookbook:Kilogram

Cookbook | Recipes | Ingredients | Units of measurement


The kilogram or kilogramme (old BE), or kilo, abbreviated kg, is a unit of weight. It is equal to 1000 g or 2⅕ (2.2) lbs. One liter of pure water weighs one kilogram. As many recipes have been approximately converted from one system to another, a similarly approximate conversion back may yield the original recipe.

Kilograms US customary measure
.025 ~1 oz
.028409 1 oz
.03 ~1 oz
.05 ~2 oz
.05681 2 oz
.06 ~2 oz
.075 ~3 oz
.085227 3 oz
.09 ~3 oz
.1 ~4 oz = ~¼ lb
.11363 4 oz = ¼ lb
.12 ~4 oz = ~¼ lb
.125 ~4 oz = ~¼ lb
.125 ¹¹⁄₄₀ (0.275) lb
.15 ~⅓ lb
.15 ⅓ lb
.225 ~½ lb
.227 ½ lb
.25 ~½ lb
.25 ¹¹⁄₂₀ (0.55) lb
.27 ⅔ lb
.3 ~⅔ lb
.45 ~1 lb
.45 1 lb
.5 ~1 lb
.5 1¹⁄₁₀ (1.1) lb
.9 ~2 lb
.90 2 lb
1 ~2 lb
1 2⅕ (2.2) lb = 35⅕ (35.2) oz
1 ~2.203125 lb = ~35¼ [35.25] oz
1 ~2¼ (2.25) lb
1.00142045 2¹³⁄₆₄ 2.203125 lb = 35¼ (35.25) oz
1.0227 2¼ (2.25) lb


NoteEdit

  • Although sometimes disregarded, especially by Anglophones, the rules of the Société Internationale (SI), state that metric abbreviations, except M for Mega or Million to distinguish from m for mili or thousandth, should never be capitalized. It should always be written "kg", never "Kg", since writing Kg literally means 1,024 grams, just as kb and Kb mean 1,000 bits and 1,024 bits, respectfully. Grams and should always be written g, never G. The only exception is 'Litre' which may be abbreviated as L instead of l in the US, Canada and Australia.