Last modified on 16 June 2009, at 03:46

Contemporary Educational Psychology/Chapter 1: The Changing Teaching Profession and You/Professionalism of Teachers/Table 1

Table 1: Two Examples of Action Research ProjectsEdit

Steps in Action Research ProjectEdit

Example 1: Students’ Use of the Internet
Example 2: A Teacher’s Helpfulness to ESL Students

Purpose of the Research (as expressed by the teacher doing the research)Edit

For Example 1: “In doing assignments, how successful are my students at finding high-quality, relevant information?”
For Example 2: “Am I responding to my ESL students as fully and helpfully as to my English-speaking students, and why or why not?”

Who Is Doing the Study?Edit

For Example 1: Classroom teacher (elementary level) and school computer specialist teacher
For Example 2: Classroom teacher (senior high level)—studying self; possibly collaborating with other teachers or with ESL specialist.

How Information Is Gathered and RecordedEdit

For Example 1: by assessing students’ assignments; by observing students while they search the Internet; by interviewing students about their search experiences
For Example 2: by videotaping of self interacting during class discussions; by keeping a journal diary by teacher of experiences with ESL vs. other students; by interviewing students of the ESL teacher

How Information Is AnalyzedEdit

For Example 1: Look for obstacles and “search tips” expressed by several students; look for common strengths and problems with research cited on assignments
For Example 2: Look for differences in type and amount of interactions with ESL vs. other students; look for patterns in the differences; by altering the patterns of interaction and observe the result

How Information is Reported and CommunicatedEdit

For Example 1: Write brief report of results for fellow staff; give brief oral report to fellow staff about results
For Example 2: Write a summary of the results in teacher’s journal diary; share results with fellow staff; share results with teacher’s students