Commit Often, Perfect Later, Publish Once: Git Best Practices/Commiting early and often

Git only takes full responsibility for your data when you commit. If you fail to commit and then do something poorly thought out, you can run into trouble. Additionally, having periodic checkpoints means that you can understand how you broke something.

People resist this out of some sense that this is ugly, limits git-bisection functionality, is confusing to observers, and might lead to accusations of stupidity. Well, I’m here to tell you that resisting this is ignorant. Commit Early And Often. If, after you are done, you want to pretend to the outside world that your work sprung complete from your mind into the repository in utter perfection with each concept fully thought out and divided into individual concept-commits, well git supports that: see Sausage Making below. However, don’t let tomorrow’s beauty stop you from performing continuous commits today.

Personally, I commit early and often and then let the sausage making be seen by all except in the most formal of circumstances.

Last modified on 25 January 2012, at 21:00