Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. f4/2...exf4/3. Nf3/3...g5/4. Bc4/4...g4

King's Gambit Accepted, 4...g4
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkbnr/pppp1p1p/8/8/2B1Ppp1/5N2/PPPP2PP/RNBQK2R

Parent: King's Gambit


King's Gambit Accepted, 4...g4Edit

With this move, Black reveals the full purpose of 3...g5 — not only did the g pawn protect Black's extra f pawn, it also threatened to dislodge White's sole defender of the h4 square, the knight on f3. White must now reconcile the dual threats of 5...gxf3 and 5...Qh4+.

White can safely ignore the threat with 5.O-O!, sacrificing his knight in order to move his king to safety, develop his rook to the semi-open f file, and rapidly develop his queen to f3. If White so chooses, he can sacrifice a second piece to move the Black king to the f-file, giving White excellent practical chances.

Because the Muzio and double Muzio gambits give Black an overwhelming number of problems to solve over the board, most players avoid this line completely and simply play 4...Bg7 with a good game.

White's alternative fifth moves, 5.Nc3!? and 5.Bxf7+, are relics of a bygone era and thus rarely seen in tournament play.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Nf3 g5 4.Bc4 g4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14  
Muzio Gambit O-O!
gxf3
Qxf3
Qf6
e5!?
Qxe5
d3
Bh6
Nc3
Ne7
Bd2
Nbc6
Rae1
Qf5
Nd5
Kd8
Qe2
Qe6
Qf2
Qf5
=
Double Muzio Gambit ...
...
...
...
...
...
Bxf7+
Kxf7
d4
Qf5
g4
Qg6
Bxf4
Nf6
=+
McDonnell Gambit Nc3!?
gxf3
Wild Muzio (Lolli) Gambit Bxf7+!?
Kxf7

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ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 6 December 2011, at 05:53