Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...e5/2. Nf3/2...Nc6/3. Bb5/3...a6/4. Ba4/4...Nf6/5. O-O/5...Be7/6. Re1/6...b5/7. Bb3/7...d6/8. c3/8...O-O/9. h3/9...Bb7

Ruy Lopez Zaitsev Variation
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

r2q1rk1/1bp1bppp/p1np1n2/1p2p3/4P3/1BP2N1P/PP1P1PP1/RNBQR1K1

Parent: Ruy Lopez

Ruy Lopez, Zaitsev VariationEdit

This is the main theoretical battleground in the Ruy Lopez today. Black's bishop aims at the White e-pawn, which will be ganged up on through moves like ...Re8 and ...Bf8, followed by taking on d4 to maximize the pressure. Meanwhile Black maintains maximum flexibility for the queen's knight: it may go to the traditional square a5, or to b4 once the c-pawn captures on d4. Karpov favored this line in his glory days of the '70s and '80s. Now it has greatly decreased in popularity in the last twenty years, but still leads to very complex, difficult positions.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Bb7 10. d4 Re8

11 12 13 14 15
Main Line a4
h6
Nbd2
Bf8
Bc2
exd4
cxd4
Nb4
Bb1
c5
+=
Nbd2
Bf8
Bc2
g6
d5
Nb8
b3
c6
c4
Bh6
=
Ng5
Rf8
f4
exf4
Bxf4
Na5
Bc2
Nd5
exd5
Bxg5
=

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ReferencesEdit

  • Modern Chess Openings 15th ed, 2008. Nick de Firmian. Random House, New York. ISBN 0-8129-3682-5.
Last modified on 2 September 2009, at 23:56