Last modified on 26 December 2011, at 23:31

Chess Opening Theory/1. e4/1...Nf6

Alekhine's Defence
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkb1r/pppppppp/5n2/8/4P3/8/PPPP1PPP/RNBQKBNR

Moves: 1. e4 Nf6
ECO code: B02-B05
Parent: King's Pawn Opening

Alekhine's DefenceEdit

1...Nf6Edit

This attack is an invitation for White to push his pawn forward and gain a tempo by attacking the knight. The idea behind Black's strategy is to have White build a large pawn center that is hard to defend.

If White doesn't want to follow the main line 2. e5, he may simply defend the pawn with 2. Nc3 (which may transpose to Vienna Game). 2. d3 is seldom seen, though it's quite solid.

A sharp variation called the Krejcik Variation consists in playing 2. Bc4. It looks like a gambit but in fact, if black takes the pawn, White can regain it and prevent Black from castling with 2...Nxe4 3. Bxf7+ Kxf7 4. Qh5+.

The opening is named after Alexander Alekhine, who introduced it in 1921.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation

1.e4 Nf6

2 3 4 5 6
Main Line e5
Nd5
d4
d6
Nf3
Bg4
Be2
e6
O-O
Be7
∞/=
Nc3
d5
exd5
Nxd5
Bc4
Nb6
Bb3
Nc6
Nf3
Bf5
=
d3
e5
Nf3
Nc6
g3
Bc5
Bg2
O-O
O-O
d6
=
...
...
f4
Nc6
Nf3
d5
fxe5
dxe4
exf6
exf3
=/+
Krejcik Variation Bc4
Nxe4
Bxf7+
Kxf7
Qh5+
Kg8
Qd5+
e6
Qxe4
d5
=+
...
...
...
...
...
g6
Qd5+
e6
Qxe4
d5
=+
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Ke8
Qxe4
d5
=+

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ReferencesEdit

  • Nunn's Chess Openings. 1999. John Nunn (Editor), Graham Burgess, John Emms, Joe Gallagher. ISBN 1-8574-4221-0.
  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.