Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...d5/2. e4/2...dxe4/3. Nc3

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit (BDG)
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkbnr/ppp1pppp/8/8/3Pp3/2N5/PPP2PPP/R1BQKBNR

Blackmar-Diemer Gambit (BDG)Edit

3. Nc3Edit

White has brought his minor piece into action and taken control of the middle. Simultaneously, he has put pressure on Black's e4 pawn, which Black must now try and defend. Nf6 or Bf5 would most commonly be used to defend the lone pawn, while e5 gives the option of a pawn transfer.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1. d4 d5 2. e4 dxe4 3. Nc3

3 4 5 6
...
Nf6
Bg5
Bf5
Nge2
e6
Ng3
Bb4
=
...
e5
dxe5
Qxd1+
Kxd1
Nc6
Nxe4
Nxe5
=
...
Bf5
Nge2
Nf6
Ng3
Bg4
Qd2
Nc6
=

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ReferencesEdit

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.
Last modified on 26 January 2011, at 04:33