Last modified on 27 October 2012, at 01:29

Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...d5/2. c4/2...dxc4/3. e3

Queen's Gambit Accepted
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkbnr/ppp1pppp/8/8/2pP4/4P3/PP3PPP/RNBQKBNR

Queen's Gambit AcceptedEdit

3. e3Edit

This move is not quite so popular as the main lines 3. e4 or 3. Nf3, but respectable nonetheless. It is a more conservative move. White opts to defend d4 instead of taking the center with pawns. Black cannot try to hold on to his c-pawn because of the famous trap 3...b5 4. a4! c6 5. axb5! cxb5?? 6. Qf3! when Black must part with at least a minor piece.

Common Black continuations include:

  • 3... e5 - a newer, aggressive move that tries to open up the position and likely results in an isolated queen pawn for white (4. dxe5? fails to 4...Qxd1! when white loses castling rights).
  • 3... e6 - The more classical, conservative approach, although it results in limited mobility for the light-squared bishop.
  • 3... Nf6 - Typical developing move. White then usually takes the c-pawn.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e3

2
e6
...
+=
e5
...
=
Nf6
...
=

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ReferencesEdit

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.