Chess Opening Theory/1. d4/1...Nf6/2. c4

Indian Defence
a b c d e f g h
8 a8 b8 c8 d8 e8 f8 g8 h8 8
7 a7 b7 c7 d7 e7 f7 g7 h7 7
6 a6 b6 c6 d6 e6 f6 g6 h6 6
5 a5 b5 c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 h5 5
4 a4 b4 c4 d4 e4 f4 g4 h4 4
3 a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 f3 g3 h3 3
2 a2 b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 g2 h2 2
1 a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 f1 g1 h1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position in Forsyth-Edwards Notation(FEN)

rnbqkb1r/pppppppp/5n2/8/2PP4/8/PP2PPPP/RNBQKBNR

Indian DefenceEdit

2. c4Edit

2.c4 strengthens White's control of the center, particularly the important d5 square. It also allows White's queenside knight to develop to the active c3 square without blocking the c-pawn.

Black has a number of possibilities at this point:

  • 2...e6 - This move is solid and flexible. Depending on how white plays, black will end up in a Queen's Indian, Nimzo-Indian, Bogo-Indian, Queen's Gambit Declined, or a Benoni.
  • 2...g6 - This tends to be more aggressive (and riskier), though still solid if one knows the important strategic points. Black has the choice to move into a King's Indian Defence (KID) (regardless of white's play) or possibly a Grünfeld if white plays 3. Nc3 and black wishes.
  • 2...c5 - This will likely end up being a Benoni (often aggressive, risky), Benko-gambit (positional pawn sacrifice by black on queenside), a symmetrical English (a bit quieter, but active pieces), or even a Tarrasch QGD (active for both sides).
  • 2...d6 - This is the so-called "Old Indian," and it can either transpose into a KID or follow less popular lines with a strategy similar to the KID.
  • 2...e5 - The Budapest Gambit. It has a unique character and often allows black active play. White usually gives the pawn back eventually, and usually gets a slightly better position, but black can do well against the ignorant white player.
  • 2...d5 - The Marshall Defence. This is not the best idea, though not an absolute trap. Several opening encyclopedias give this a clear advantage to white if played right.

Theory tableEdit

For explanation of theory tables see theory table and for notation see algebraic notation.

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4

2 3 4 5 6
King's Indian Defence c4
g6
Nc3
Bg7
e4
d6
Nf3
O-O
Be2
e5
=
Grunfeld Defence ...
...
...
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
e4
Nxc3
bxc3
Bg7
=
Benoni Defence ...
c5
d5
e6
Nc3
exd5
cxd5
d6
e4
g6
+/=
Queen's Indian Defence ...
e6
Nf3
b6
a3
Bb7
Nc3
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
+/=
Bogo-Indian Defence ...
...
...
Bb4+
Bd2
Qe7
g3
Nc6
Nc3
Bxc3
+/=
Nimzo-Indian Defence ...
...
Nc3
Bb4
e3
O-O
Bd3
d5
Nf3
c5
=
Catalan Opening ...
...
g3
d5
Bg2
dxc4
Nf3
Be7
O-O
O-O
=
Black Knights' Tango ...
Nc6
Nf3
e6
a3
d6
Nc3
g6
e4
Bg7
+/=
Budapest Gambit ...
e5
dxe5
Ng4
Bf4
Nc6
Nf3
Bb4+
Nbd2
Qe7
+=
Old Indian Defence ...
d6
Nc3
e5
Nf3
Nbd7
e4
Be7

+/=
Marshall Defence ...
d5
cxd5
Nxd5
Nf3
Bf5
Qb3


+/=

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ReferencesEdit

  • Batsford Chess Openings 2 (1989, 1994). Garry Kasparov, Raymond Keene. ISBN 0-8050-3409-9.
Last modified on 16 September 2012, at 19:58